Driehaus Architecture Prize

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Driehaus Architecture Prize
Driehaus Architecture Prize for New Classical Architecture Logo Award.jpg
Awarded for A career of achievement in the art of classical architecture.
Sponsored by The Richard H. Driehaus Charitable Lead Trust
Country United States of America Edit this on Wikidata
Presented by The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture
Reward(s) US$200,000[1]
First awarded 2003
Last awarded 2017
Website www.driehausprize.org

The Driehaus Architecture Prize, fully named The Richard H. Driehaus Prize at the University of Notre Dame, is a global award to honor a major contributor in the field of contemporary vernacular and classical architecture, commonly referred to as New Classical architecture. The Driehaus Prize was conceived as an alternative to the predominantly modernist Pritzker Prize.

It was initiated by fund manager and philanthropist Richard Driehaus and established in 2003 by the Richard H. Driehaus Charitable Lead Trust. It is presented annually through the school of architecture at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana, United States.

The most recent winner is 2017 laureate Robert Adam of ADAM Architecture, who was officially presented the prize March 25, 2017 in Chicago.[2]

Award[edit]

The Driehaus Prize is awarded to a living architect whose work embodies the principles of traditional and classical architecture and urbanism in contemporary society, and reflects what the jury considers positive cultural, environmental and artistic impacts. The award itself is a bronze miniature of the Choragic Monument of Lysicrates, known as the first use of the Corinthian order on the outside of a building.[3] The award includes a monetary prize of US$200,000.

The award jury annually selects an architect who has greatly influenced the field of traditional and classical architecture. The jury travels together to a city of architectural significance, exploring it together, and taking the city’s urban fabric as a backdrop for its deliberations.[4]

The jury also awards the Henry Hope Reed Award, given in conjunction with the Driehaus Prize to an individual working outside the practice of architecture who has supported the cultivation of the traditional city, its architecture and art through writing, planning or promotion.[5]

The jury has included notable architects and educators such as Adele Chatfield-Taylor (since 2004, President Emerita of the American Academy in Rome), Robert S. Davis (since 2009, developer and co-founder of Seaside, Florida), Paul Goldberger (since 2006, former architecture critic for The New Yorker), Léon Krier (since 2005, inaugural Driehaus Prize recipient), and Witold Rybczynski (since 2011, architecture critic and professor of urbanism at the University of Pennsylvania).[6]

History[edit]

Driehaus, the founder, chief investment officer and chairman of Driehaus Capital Management in Chicago, established the award program through Notre Dame in 2003 because of its reputation as a national leader in incorporating the ideals of traditional and classical architecture into the task of modern urban development. In 2007, Driehaus announced that he would increase the prize monies given out annually through the Driehaus Prize and the Reed Award to a combined $250,000. The two prizes represent the most significant recognition for classicism in the contemporary built environment.[7]

Laureates[edit]

The following architects have been awarded the Driehaus Prize[8] since 2003:

Year Laureate Nationality Photo Example work (years built) Website Ref.
2003 Krier, LéonLéon Krier  Luxembourg The inaugural laureate Léon Krier in Frankfurt, 2007 Village Hall of Windsor Village Hall of Windsor, USA (1997) Krier at Yale, Inofficial fan site [9]
2004 Porphyrios, DemetriDemetri Porphyrios  Greece Whitman College Whitman College, Princeton University, Princeton, USA (2002) Porphyrios Associates [10]
2005 Terry, QuinlanQuinlan Terry  United Kingdom Richmond Riverside Richmond Riverside, London, UK (1984–87) Quinlan and Francis Terry Architects [11]
2006 Greenberg, AllanAllan Greenberg  South Africa Dupont Hall Dupont Hall at University of Delaware, Newark, USA (1998–2002) Allan Greenberg LLC [12]
2007 Robertson, Jaquelin T.Jaquelin T. Robertson  United States Celebration Town Square Celebration masterplan, Osceola, USA (2000) Cooper, Robertson & Partners [13]
2008 Duany, AndrésAndrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk  United States Andrés Duany in Biloxi, 2005 Seaside architecture Seaside masterplan, Walton, USA (1980) Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company [14]
2009 El-Wakil, Abdel-WahedAbdel-Wahed El-Wakil  Egypt Mosque of the two Qiblas Masjid al-Qiblatain extension, Medina, Saudi Arabia (1980) Awwakil [15]
2010 Martos, Rafael ManzanoRafael Manzano Martos  Spain Prado Museum Museo del Prado extension, Madrid, Spain (1990) Estudio Manzano [16]
2011 Stern, Robert A. M.Robert A. M. Stern  United States Historic Districts Council Landmarks Lion awards in 2015 Fell Hall at Brooklyn Law School Fell Hall at Brooklyn Law School, New York City, USA (1994) Robert A. M. Stern Architects [17]
2012 Graves, MichaelMichael Graves  United States Michael Graves, drawing 2003 McNair Hall at Jesse Jones Business School McNair Hall at Jesse Jones Business School, Houston, USA (1999) Michael Graves & Associates [18]
2013 Beeby, Thomas H.Thomas H. Beeby  United States Meadows Museum in Dallas Meadows Museum, Dallas, USA HBRA Architects [19]
2014 Bontempi, Pier CarloPier Carlo Bontempi  Italy Pier Carlo Bontempi in 2014 Place de Toscane in Serris, France Place de Toscane, Serris, France Studio Pier Carlo Bontempi [20]
2015 Schwarz, David M.David M. Schwarz  United States David M Schwarz and Geoffrey Baer.jpg Smith Center for the Performing Arts in Las Vegas, United States Smith Center for the Performing Arts, Las Vegas, USA David M. Schwarz Architects [21]
2016 Merrill, ScottScott Merrill  United States Seaside Chapel in Seaside Florida Seaside Chapel in Florida, designed in 2001 Merrill, Pastor & Colgan Architects [22]
2017 Robert Adam  United Kingdom Millennium Gate in Atlanta, USA Millennium Gate in Atlanta, USA ADAM Architecture [2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Driehaus at Notre Dame SoA - Together, the $200,000 Driehaus Prize and the $50,000 Reed Award represent the most significant recognition for classicism in the contemporary built environment.; retained March 6, 2014
  2. ^ a b "Architect Robert Adam to Receive the 2017 Driehaus Prize". Notre Dame School of Architecture. Retrieved 21 January 2017. 
  3. ^ Choragic Monument, bronze miniature for Driehaus Prize
  4. ^ "Driehaus Prize Jury". University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. Retrieved 30 March 2014. 
  5. ^ "Driehaus Prize Nomination Process". University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  6. ^ "Pier Carlo Bontempi Named 2014 Driehaus Laureate - Jury". ArchDaily. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  7. ^ "Driehaus Prize and Henry Hope Reed Award Double to a Combined $250,000". PR Newswire. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  8. ^ "Driehaus Prize Recipients". University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. Retrieved 11 February 2013. 
  9. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2003". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  10. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2004". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  11. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2005". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  12. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2006". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  13. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2007". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  14. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2008". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  15. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2009". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  16. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2010". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  17. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2011". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  18. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2012". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  19. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2013". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  20. ^ "Driehaus Prize 2014". NDSA. Retrieved 29 March 2014. 
  21. ^ "Architect David M. Schwarz to Receive the 2015 Richard H. Driehaus Prize". Notre Dame School of Architecture. Retrieved 21 January 2015. 
  22. ^ Massie, Caroline (20 January 2016). "Architect Scott Merrill Wins University of Notre Dame's 2016 Richard H. Driehaus Prize". Architect Magazine. Retrieved 16 April 2016. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]