Russia women's national ice hockey team

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Russia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Большая красная машина (The Big Red Machine)
Association Ice Hockey Federation of Russia
Head coach Mikhail Chekanov
Assistants Evgeni Erfilov
Vladislav Prodan
Yevgeni Sherbakov
Captain Anna Shukina
Team colors               
IIHF code RUS
Russia national hockey team jerseys - 2014 Winter Olympics.png
Ranking
Current IIHF 4 Increase 2
Highest IIHF 4 (first in 2013)
Lowest IIHF 6 (first in 2005)
First international
  Switzerland 2–1 Russia 
(Brampton, Canada; 1 April 1994)
Biggest win
 Russia 15–0 France 
(Esbjerg, Denmark; 28 March 1995)
 Russia 16–1 Denmark 
(Lyss, Switzerland; 29 December 1997)
Biggest defeat
 United States 15–0 Russia 
(Mississauga, Canada; 4 April 2000)
IIHF World Women's Championships
Appearances 13 (first in 1997)
Best result 3rd, bronze medalist(s) (2001, 2013, 2016)
IIHF European Women Championships
Appearances 2 (first in 1995)
Best result 2nd, silver medalist(s) (1996)
Olympics
Appearances 3 (first in 2002)
International record (W–L–T)
103–130–7
Russia women's national ice hockey team
Medal record
World Championships
Bronze medal – third place 2001 United States
Bronze medal – third place 2013 Canada
Bronze medal – third place 2016 Canada
Winter Universiade
Gold medal – first place 2015 Spain Team

The Russian women's national ice hockey team represents Russia at the International Ice Hockey Federation's IIHF World Women's Championships. The women's national team is controlled by Ice Hockey Federation of Russia. Russia had 308 female players in 2011.[1]

The Russian women warming up before the game against China at the 2010 Winter Olympics.

History[edit]

On 1 April 1994, Russia played its first game in Brampton, Canada, lost by 1–2 to Switzerland.[2] Russia is currently ranked 4th in the world in women's ice hockey. This is also the highest rank in team's history. Three times – at 2001 Women's World Ice Hockey Championships, the 2013 IIHF Women's World Championship and the 2016 IIHF Women's World Championship Russia reached 3rd place by upsetting Finland in the bronze medal game.

Tournament record[edit]

Olympic Games[edit]

  • 2002 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2006 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2010 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2014 – Finished in 6th place

World Championship[edit]

  • 1997 – Finished in 6th place
  • 1999 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2000 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2001Bronze medal icon.svg Won bronze medal
  • 2004 – Finished in 5th place
  • 2005 – Finished in 8th place
  • 2007 – Finished in 7th place
  • 2008 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2009 – Finished in 5th place[3]
  • 2011 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2012 – Finished in 6th place
  • 2013Bronze medal icon.svg Won bronze medal
  • 2015 – Finished in 4th place
  • 2016Bronze medal icon.svg Won bronze medal

European Championship[edit]

  • 1995 – Finished in 7th place (won Pool B)
  • 1996Silver medal icon.svg Won silver medal

Team[edit]

Current roster[edit]

Roster for the 2016 IIHF Women's World Championship.[4]

Head coach: Mikhail Chekanov

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Team
1 G Nadezhda Morozova 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 70 kg (150 lb) (1996-11-29) November 29, 1996 (age 20) Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk
2 D Angelina Goncharenko 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 71 kg (157 lb) (1994-05-23) May 23, 1994 (age 22) Russia Tornado Moscow
3 F Fanuza Kadirova 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 60 kg (130 lb) (1998-04-06) April 6, 1998 (age 18) Russia Arktik-Univ. Ukhta
4 D Yekaterina Nikolayeva 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 66 kg (146 lb) (1995-10-05) October 5, 1995 (age 21) Russia HC St. Petersburg
7 F Elina Mitrofanova 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 55 kg (121 lb) (1992-01-28) January 28, 1992 (age 25) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
8 F Iya GavrilovaA 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1987-09-03) September 3, 1987 (age 29) Canada Univ. of Calgary
9 F Alexandra Vafina 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1990-07-28) July 28, 1990 (age 26) Canada Univ. of Calgary
10 F Liudmila Belyakova 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1994-08-12) August 12, 1994 (age 22) United States New York Riveters
13 D Nina Pirogova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 69 kg (152 lb) (1999-01-26) January 26, 1999 (age 18) Russia Tornado Moscow
15 F Valeria Pavlova 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 75 kg (165 lb) (1995-04-15) April 15, 1995 (age 21) Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk
16 F Yelena Silina 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1987-06-20) June 20, 1987 (age 29) Russia Nizhni Novgorod
17 F Yekaterina SmolentsevaA 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1981-09-15) September 15, 1981 (age 35) United States Connecticut Whale
18 F Olga Sosina 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 73 kg (161 lb) (1992-07-27) July 27, 1992 (age 24) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
21 D Anna ShukinaC 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 82 kg (181 lb) (1987-11-05) November 5, 1987 (age 29) Russia HC St. Petersburg
23 F Tatiana Burina 1.64 m (5 ft 5 in) 70 kg (150 lb) (1980-03-20) March 20, 1980 (age 37) Russia Tornado Moscow
24 F Alevtina Shtaryova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 67 kg (148 lb) (1997-02-09) February 9, 1997 (age 20) Russia Tornado Moscow
26 F Yelena Dergachyova 1.59 m (5 ft 3 in) 59 kg (130 lb) (1995-11-08) November 8, 1995 (age 21) Russia Tornado Moscow
31 G Anna Prugova 1.75 m (5 ft 9 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (1993-11-20) November 20, 1993 (age 23) Russia HC St. Petersburg
33 G Maria Sorokina 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 58 kg (128 lb) (1995-08-19) August 19, 1995 (age 21) Russia HC St. Petersburg
44 D Alexandra Kapustina 1.68 m (5 ft 6 in) 73 kg (161 lb) (1984-04-07) April 7, 1984 (age 32) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
55 F Galina Skiba 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 68 kg (150 lb) (1984-05-09) May 9, 1984 (age 32) Russia Tornado Moscow
70 D Anna Shibanova 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 62 kg (137 lb) (1994-11-10) November 10, 1994 (age 22) Russia HC Agidel Ufa
88 F Yekaterina Smolina 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 59 kg (130 lb) (1988-10-08) October 8, 1988 (age 28) Russia HC St. Petersburg

Notable players[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Profile
  2. ^ "Women's international matches 1993/94" (in French). HockeyArchives. Retrieved 30 November 2009. 
  3. ^ "Final Ranking As of SUN 12 APR 2009" (PDF). IIHF.com. Retrieved 30 November 2009. 
  4. ^ 2016 Roster

External links[edit]