List of Nunataks

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Nunataks, also called glacial islands, are exposed portions of ridges, mountains, or peaks not covered with ice or snow within (or at the edge of) an ice field or glacier.[1] Nunataks present readily identifiable landmark reference points in glaciers or ice caps and are often named. The term is derived from the Inuit word, nunataq.

Antarctica[edit]

Nestinari Nunataks from Komini Peak, Livingston Island, Anctartica.

Queen Maud Land[edit]

Bruns Nunataks[edit]

The Bruns Nunataks (72°5′S 1°10′E / 72.083°S 1.167°E / -72.083; 1.167 (Bruns Nunataks)) are a small group of nunataks, lying 2.5 nautical miles (5 km) west-northwest of Brattskarvet Mountain in the Sverdrup Mountains of Queen Maud Land. The name "Bruns-Berge", after Herbert Bruns, electrical engineer with the expedition, was applied in this area by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39) under Alfred Ritscher.[2]

Charles Nunataks[edit]

The Charles Nunataks (73°19′S 2°10′E / 73.317°S 2.167°E / -73.317; 2.167 (Charles Nunataks)) are an isolated group of nunataks lying 8 nautical miles (15 km) south of the western end of the Neumayer Cliffs in Queen Maud Land. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian–British–Swedish Antarctic Expedition (NBSAE) (1949–52) and from air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59), and named for Charles W. Swithinbank, glaciologist with NBSAE.[3]

Dråpane Nunataks[edit]

The Dråpane Nunataks (73°46′S 5°3′E / 73.767°S 5.050°E / -73.767; 5.050 (Dråpane Nunataks)) are nunataks north of Urnosa Spur, near the southwest end of the Kirwan Escarpment in Queen Maud Land. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the NBSAE and additional air photos (1958–59), and named Dråpane (the drops).[4]

Firlingane Nunataks[edit]

The Firlingane Nunataks (coordinates: 71°52′S 27°7′E) are four nunataks standing between Bulken Hill and Hesteskoen Nunatak in the Sør Rondane Mountains of Antarctica. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named Firlingane (the quadruplets).[5]

Hamarskaftet Nunataks[edit]

Hemmestad Nunataks[edit]

The Hemmestad Nunataks (coordinates: 71°40′S 8°26′) are a group of about 20 nunataks extending over about 7 nautical miles (13 km), forming the northeast portion of the Drygalski Mountains in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39), were mapped from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named for Arne Hemmestad, a mechanic with the Norwegian expedition (1956–57).[7][8]

  • Arne Nunatak (coordinates: 71°43′S 8°20′E) is the largest of the Hemmestad Nunataks. It is also named for Arne Hemmestad.[9]

Henriksen Nunataks[edit]

The Henriksen Nunataks (coordinates: 71°30′S 9°0′E) are a group of scattered nunataks about 10 nautical miles (20 km) north of the Kurze Mountains in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39), mapped from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named for Hans-Martin Henriksen, a meteorological assistant with the latter expedition (1956–58).[10]

Hettene Nunataks[edit]

The Hettene Nunataks (coordinates: 71°45′S 26°25′E) are a group of nunataks at the west side of Hette Glacier in the Sør Rondane Mountains of Antarctica. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named Hettene (the caps).[11]

Holane Nunataks[edit]

The Holane Nunataks (coordinates: 71°58′S 0°29′E) are two isolated nunataks lying about 20 nautical miles (40 km) west of the northern extremity of the Sverdrup Mountains, in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were mapped and named by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian–British–Swedish Antarctic Expedition (1949–52) and from air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59).[12]

Isrosene Nunataks[edit]

The Isrosene Nunataks (coordinates: 71°53′S 26°35′E) are two nunataks 6 miles (10 km) west-northwest of Balchen Mountain, protruding through the western part of Byrdbreen in the Sør Rondane Mountains of Antarctica. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named "Isrosene" (the ice roses).[13]

Jare IV Nunataks[edit]

The Jare IV Nunataks (coordinates: 71°38′S 36°0′E) are a group of four aligned nunataks situated 3 nautical miles (6 km) north-northeast of Mount Gaston de Gerlache in the Queen Fabiola Mountains of Antarctica. They were discovered on October 7, 1960 by the Belgian Antarctic Expedition under Guido Derom, and were named by Derom after the fourth Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE IV); in November–December 1960 a field party of the Japanese expedition reached this area and carried out geodetic and other scientific work.[14]

Jarl Nunataks[edit]

The Jarl Nunataks (coordinates: 71°55′S 3°18′E) are a small group of nunataks 3 nautical miles (6 km) north of Risen Peak which mark the northeastern extremity of the Gjelsvik Mountains in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were mapped from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named for Jarl Tonnesen, a meteorologist with the expedition (1956–58).[15]

Knattebrauta Nunataks[edit]

The Knattebrauta Nunataks (coordinates: 72°27′S 0°18′E) are a line of nunataks trending northeast–southwest lying 4 nautical miles (7 km) north of the Robin Heights in the Sverdrup Mountains, Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were photographed from the air by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39), mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the NBSAE and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Knattebrauta (the crag slope).[16]

  • Kvassknatten Nunatak (coordinates: 72°27′S 0°20′E) is one of the Knattebrauta Nunataks. It was photographed from the air by the Third German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39). It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the NBSAE and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Kvassknatten (the sharp crag).[17]

Litvillingane Rocks[edit]

The Litvillingane Rocks (coordinates: 71°52′S 1°44′W) are two isolated nunataks, the eastern with a small outlier, lying 3 nautical miles (6 km) south of Bolten Peak, on the east side of Ahlmann Ridge in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. They were mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the NBSAE and air photos by the Norwegian expedition (1958–59) and named Litvillingane (the mountainside twins).[18]

Malyutki Nunataks[edit]

The Malyutki Nunataks (coordinates: 72°4′S 10°46′E) are a group of nunataks that trend north–south for 4 nautical miles (7 km), situated at the southeastern extremity of the Orvin Mountains, about 13 nautical miles (24 km) west-northwest of Skeidsberget Hill, in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. The feature was mapped by the Norsk Polarinstitutt from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60. It was also mapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1961 and named "Skaly Malyutki" (baby nunataks).[19]

Nevskiye Nunataks[edit]

Nevskiye Nunataks (coordinates: 71°40′S 8°5′E) are a group of scattered nunataks comprising the Sørensen Nunataks and Hemmestad Nunataks in the Drygalski Mountains, Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norsk Polarinstitutt from surveys and air photos by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956-60. Also mapped by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1961; the name is an adjective derived from Neva, a river in the Soviet Union.[20]

Onezhskiye Nunataks[edit]

Onezhskiye Nunataks (coordinates: 71°35′S 7°3′E) is a small group of nunataks, situated 9 nautical miles (17 km) north-northeast of Slettefjellet in the Muhlig-Hofmann Mountains, Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norsk Polarinstitutt from surveys and air photos by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956-60. Also mapped by Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1961; the name is an adjective derived from Onega, a river in the Soviet Union.[21]

Perlebandet Nunataks[edit]

Perlebandet Nunataks (coordinates: 71°56′S 23°3′E) is a linear group of nunataks 5 nautical miles (9 km) northwest of Tanngarden Peaks in the Sor Rondane Mountains. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from aerial photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named Perlebandet (the string of beads).[23]

Pingvinane Nunataks[edit]

Pingvinane Nunataks (coordinates: 72°0′S 23°17′E) are a group of nunataks standing close north of Tanngarden Peaks in the Sor Rondane Mountains. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers in 1957 from air photos taken by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, and named Pingvinane (the penguins).[24]

Plogskaftet Nunataks[edit]

Plogskaftet Nunataks (coordinates: 71°48′S 5°12′E) are a row of nunataks about 5 nautical miles (9 km) long lying close northwest of Cumulus Mountain in the Muhlig-Hofmann Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Mapped from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Plogskaftet (the plow handle).[25]

Rimekalvane Nunataks[edit]

Rimekalvane Nunataks (coordinates: 72°3′S 13°38′E) is a group of nunataks 4 nautical miles (7 km) east of Dekefjellrantane Hills in the Weyprecht Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Photographed from the air by the German Antarctic Expedition (1938–39). Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Rimekalvane (the frost calves).[26]

Ristkalvane Nunataks[edit]

Ristkalvane Nunataks (coordinates: 71°41′S 10°36′E) is a small group of nunataks forming the north end of Shcherbakov Range, in the Orvin Mountains of Queen Maud Land. Discovered and photographed by the German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped by Norway from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Ristkalvane (the ridge calves).[27]

Rokhlin Nunataks[edit]

Rokhlin Nunataks (coordinates: 72°12′S 14°28′E) are four nunataks standing 6 nautical miles (11 km) south of Linnormen Hills at the south extremity of the Payer Mountains, in Queen Maud Land. Discovered and first plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped from air photos by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1958–59; remapped by Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named after M.I. Rokhlin, a wintering over geologist who died in 1958.[28]

  • Filsponen Nunatak (coordinates: 72°12′S 14°25′E) is a nunatak rising northeast of Steinfila Nunatak in the southern part of the Payer Mountains in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Sixth Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Filsponen (the filings).[29]
  • Komandnaya Nunatak (coordinates: 72°12′S 14°31′E) is the eastern and highest of the Rokhlin Nunataks, located in the southern part of the Payer Mountains in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was discovered and plotted from air photos by the Third German Antarctic Expedition, 1938–39. The nunatak was mapped from air photos and surveys collected by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61 and named Gora Komandnaya (Russian for "command mountain").[30]
  • Skruvestikka Nunatak (coordinates: 72°11′S 14°27′E) is a nunatak just eastward of Filsponen Nunatak at the south end of the Payer Mountains, in Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from air photos taken by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Skruvestikka (the screwdriver).[31]
  • Steinfila Nunatak (coordinates: 72°12′S 14°23′E) is the westernmost of Rokhlin Nunataks which mark the southwest extremity of the Payer Mountains in Queen Maud Land. Mapped by Norwegian cartographers from surveys and air photos by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition (1956–60) and named Steinfila (the stone file).[32]

Sandhøkalvane Nunataks[edit]

Sandhøkalvane Nunataks (coordinates: 71°46′S 9°55′E) are a group of nunataks located 4 nautical miles (7.4 km) northeast of Sandhø Heights, lying between the Conrad Mountains and Mount Dallmann in Queen Maud Land. They were discovered and photographed by the German Antarctic Expedition in 1938-39, and mapped by Norway from air photos and surveys by the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60, and named Sandhøkalvane ("the sand heights calves").[33]

Single nunataks[edit]

Nunataks of Victoria Land[edit]

Individual nunataks[edit]

South America[edit]

North America[edit]

Greenland[edit]

Nunataks in eastern Greenland
Nunataks in western Greenland

United States[edit]

Asia[edit]

Europe[edit]

Norway[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Physical Geography: Hydrosphere, 2006, ISBN 8183561675, p. 114
  2. ^ "Bruns Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2011-09-22. 
  3. ^ "Charles Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2011-11-03. 
  4. ^ "Dråpane Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-01-30. 
  5. ^ "Firlingane Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-23. 
  6. ^ "Hamarskaftet Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-05-17. 
  7. ^ "Hemmestad Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-06-11. 
  8. ^  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "List of Nunataks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
  9. ^ "Rimekalvane Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Henriksen Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-06-13. 
  11. ^ "Hettene Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-06-16. 
  12. ^ "Holane Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-06-20. 
  13. ^ "Isrosene Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-07-11. 
  14. ^ "Jare IV Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-07-17. 
  15. ^ "Jarl Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-07-17. 
  16. ^ "Knattebrauta Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-05-10. 
  17. ^ "Kvassknatten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-05-21. 
  18. ^ "Litvillingane Rocks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-06-25. 
  19. ^ "Malyutki Nunataks". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-07-30. 
  20. ^ "Nevskiye Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  21. ^ "Onezhskiye Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  22. ^ "Storkvarvsteinen Peak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  23. ^ "Perlebandet Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
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  25. ^ "Plogskaftet Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  26. ^ "Rimekalvane Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  27. ^ "Rimekalvane Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  28. ^ "Skruvestikka Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  29. ^ "Filsponen Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-22. 
  30. ^ "Komandnaya Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-05-14. 
  31. ^ "Skruvestikka Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  32. ^ "Steinfila Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  33. ^ "Sandhøkalvane Nunataks". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  34. ^  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "List of Nunataks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
  35. ^  This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "List of Nunataks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).
  36. ^ "Chernushka Nunatak". Gna-GeographicNamesOfTheAntarctic1stEdition1981_djvu. p. 395. Retrieved November 5, 2011. 
  37. ^ "Chernushka Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved November 5, 2011. 
  38. ^ "Dalten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2011-12-16. 
  39. ^ "Dilten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-01-19. 
  40. ^ "Drabanten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-01-30. 
  41. ^ "Ekspress Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-02-27. 
  42. ^ "Eremitten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-03. 
  43. ^ "Fjomet Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-26. 
  44. ^ "Fløymannen Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  45. ^ "Fokknuten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-03-29. 
  46. ^ "Førstefjell". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  47. ^ "Førstefjellsrabben". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  48. ^ "Framrabben Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-04-06. 
  49. ^ "Galyshev Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-04-16. 
  50. ^ "Gårenevkalven Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-04-17. 
  51. ^ "Glopenesranen Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-04-26. 
  52. ^ "Gløymdehorten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-04-26. 
  53. ^ "Gråsteinen Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-05-04. 
  54. ^ "Hans-Martin Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-05-21. 
  55. ^ "Hesteskoen Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-06-15. 
  56. ^ "Kista Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-05-08. 
  57. ^ "Knotten Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-05-12. 
  58. ^ "Lars Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-05-31. 
  59. ^ "Marsteinen Nunatak". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2013-08-16. 
  60. ^ "Nordtoppen Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  61. ^ "Odde Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  62. ^ "Odinokaya Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  63. ^ "Okskaya Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  64. ^ "Passat Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  65. ^ "Per Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  66. ^ "Pilten Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  67. ^ "Pyramiden Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  68. ^ "SamoylovichNunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  69. ^ "Sandneskalven Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  70. ^ "Sfinksen Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 
  71. ^ "Tommeliten Rock (Dronning Maud Land)". The Norwegian Polar Institute. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved March 5, 2016. 
  72. ^ "Low Nunatak". Australian Antarctic Data Centre. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved March 6, 2016. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "List of Nunataks" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).