Maxim Noreau

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Maxim Noreau
Born (1987-05-24) May 24, 1987 (age 31)
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Height 6 ft 0 in (183 cm)
Weight 198 lb (90 kg; 14 st 2 lb)
Position Defence
Shoots Right
NL team
Former teams
ZSC Lions
Minnesota Wild
HC Ambrì-Piotta
SC Bern
National team  Canada
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 2007–present

Maxim Noreau (born May 24, 1987) is a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman currently playing for ZSC Lions of the National League (NL). He has formerly played in the National Hockey League (NHL) with the Minnesota Wild.

Playing career[edit]

On May 22, 2008, Noreau was signed as a free agent to a three-year entry level contract with the Minnesota Wild.[1] He spent most of the 2009–10 season with the Houston Aeros of the American Hockey League. He posted 52 points in 76 games to earn selection in the AHL Second All-Star Team.[2] Noreau also made his National Hockey League debut on April 8, 2010 with the Minnesota Wild.[3]

Following the conclusion of the 2010–11 season, Noreau was traded from the Wild to the New Jersey Devils for David McIntyre on June 16, 2011.[4] With his rights owned by the Devils on August 1, 2011, Noreau signed a one-year European deal with HC Ambri-Piotta of the Swiss National League A. In his first season with Piotta in 2011–12, Noreau led the defense and scored 30 points in 44 games. As a result he was selected to the NLA All-Star Team and was re-signed to a three-year contract extension on November 6, 2011.[5] In the 2012–13 season, despite missing out on the post-season for the season consecutive season, he was again the offensive presence from the blueline for Piotta, contributing with 10 goals and 35 assists to lead the league in defensive scoring.

Noreau posted 102 points in 146 games over three seasons before he was released from the final year of his contract with Ambri-Piotta to sign a two-year, one-way contract with the Colorado Avalanche on July 7, 2014.[6] He spent the entirety of his contract within the Avalanche's AHL affiliates. During the 2014–15 season with the Lake Erie Monsters, he was leading defensemen with 30 points in 39 games before he suffered a season-ending injury. In the following season, Noreau was re-assigned to new AHL affiliate, the San Antonio Rampage, again leading the blueline in scoring, placing second overall among the Rampage with 45 points in 64 games.

In April 2016, unable to further his NHL career, Noreau put pen to paper on a two-year deal to return to Switzerland with SC Bern of the NLA[7] In December 2016, he won his second Spengler Cup with Team Canada and was named to the tournament's all-star team.[8] One year later, he captained Canada to another victory at the Spengler Cup.[9]

On March 1, 2018, Noreau agreed to a two-year contract with rival NL club, the ZSC Lions worth CHF 1.8 million, starting from the 2018–19 season.[10]

Family[edit]

His younger brother, Samuel Noreau, is a professional hockey player currently with the Missouri Mavericks of the ECHL, he was formerly a prospect within the New York Rangers organization.[11]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season and playoffs[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
2004–05 Victoriaville Tigres QMJHL 65 5 8 13 47 7 0 0 0 8
2005–06 Victoriaville Tigres QMJHL 69 22 43 65 116 5 2 4 6 7
2006–07 Victoriaville Tigres QMJHL 69 17 53 70 106 6 2 1 3 8
2007–08 Texas Wildcatters ECHL 2 0 3 3 0
2007–08 Houston Aeros AHL 50 8 8 16 48 5 0 0 0 4
2008–09 Houston Aeros AHL 77 14 25 39 49 20 4 7 11 2
2009–10 Houston Aeros AHL 76 18 34 52 60
2009–10 Minnesota Wild NHL 1 0 0 0 0
2010–11 Houston Aeros AHL 76 10 44 54 58 24 2 10 12 23
2010–11 Minnesota Wild NHL 5 0 0 0 0
2011–12 HC Ambrì-Piotta NLA 44 7 23 30 22
2012–13 HC Ambrì-Piotta NLA 45 10 25 35 38
2013–14 HC Ambrì-Piotta NLA 35 8 16 24 28 4 0 0 0 2
2014–15 Lake Erie Monsters AHL 39 8 22 30 29
2015–16 San Antonio Rampage AHL 64 12 33 45 31
2016–17 SC Bern NLA 35 4 14 18 8 4 1 2 3 4
2017–18 SC Bern NL 32 8 16 24 18 11 1 6 7 2
NHL totals 6 0 0 0 0

International[edit]

Year Team Event Result GP G A Pts PIM
2012 Canada SC 1st, gold medalist(s) 4 0 0 0 2
2013 Canada SC 4th 2 1 0 1 0
2016 Canada SC 1st, gold medalist(s) 5 3 1 4 0
2017 Canada SC 1st, gold medalist(s) 9 5 6 11 0
2018 Canada OG 3rd, bronze medalist(s) 6 2 5 7 0
Senior totals 6 2 5 7 0

Awards and honours[edit]

Medal record
Ice hockey
Representing  Canada
Spengler Cup
Gold medal – first place 2012 Davos
Gold medal – first place 2016 Davos
Gold medal – first place 2017 Davos
Olympic Games
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Pyeongchang
Award Year
AHL
First All-Star Team 2011 [12]
Second All-Star Team 2010 [2]
NLA
All-Star Team 2012
Most assists by defenceman 2013
Most points by defenceman 2013
Most goals by defenceman 2014
International
Olympic All-Star Team 2018 [13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Wild signs Maxim Noreau". Minnesota Wild. 2008-05-22. Retrieved 2010-05-03.
  2. ^ a b "First and Second All-Star Team named". American Hockey League. 2010-04-01. Retrieved 2010-05-03.
  3. ^ "Maxim Noreau, Wild". National Hockey League. Retrieved 2010-04-10.
  4. ^ "Devils acquire Maxim Noreau". New Jersey Devils. 2011-06-16. Retrieved 2011-06-16.
  5. ^ "Noreau in Biancoblu until 2015" (in Italian). HC Ambri-Piotta. 2011-11-06. Archived from the original on 2011-11-12. Retrieved 2011-11-06.
  6. ^ "Maxim Noreau off to Colorado, Ambrì-Piotta signs another Canadian". swisshockeynews.ch. 2014-07-07. Retrieved 2014-07-07.
  7. ^ "Maxim Noreau to SCB". SC Bern. 2016-04-26. Retrieved 2016-04-26.
  8. ^ "14th triumph for Team Canada | Spengler Cup". www.spenglercup.ch. Retrieved 2016-12-31.
  9. ^ "Renewed Triumph for Team Canada | Spengler Cup". www.spenglercup.ch. Retrieved 2017-12-31.
  10. ^ "Confirmed - Maxim Noreau joins ZSC, Kevin Klein to retire". www.swisshockeynews.ch. Retrieved 2018-03-02.
  11. ^ "Samuel Noreau player profile". Eliteprospects.com. 2014-07-07. Retrieved 2014-07-07.
  12. ^ "2010-11 First and Second All-Stars named". American Hockey League. 2011-03-26. Archived from the original on 2012-09-21. Retrieved 2011-03-26.
  13. ^ "Kovalchuk MVP". IIHF.com. February 25, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018.

External links[edit]