Talk:1981 Canada Cup

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Good article 1981 Canada Cup has been listed as one of the Sports and recreation good articles under the good article criteria. If you can improve it further, please do so. If it no longer meets these criteria, you can reassess it.
October 21, 2011 Good article nominee Listed
WikiProject Ice Hockey (Rated GA-class)
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WikiProject Canada (Rated GA-class, Mid-importance)
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Redirect[edit]

I think this article will be expanded in the future the same as the other tournaments in the Canada Cup, but currently it's useless to have just one sentence. Dominykas Blyze 19:47, 20 February 2006 (UTC)

GA Review[edit]

This review is transcluded from Talk:1981 Canada Cup/GA1. The edit link for this section can be used to add comments to the review.

Reviewer: Wizardman (talk · contribs) 16:32, 16 October 2011 (UTC)

I'll review this article shortly. Wizardman Operation Big Bear 16:32, 16 October 2011 (UTC)

Here are the issues I found:

  • "Play so well that the Canadian fans when they will leave Forum will wait for you when you get on the bus after the game and admire you." Can you double-check this quote in the ref? It reads rather oddly but maybe that's how he said it.

That's really the only issue I found. Once that's looked at I'll pass the article. Wizardman Operation Big Bear 17:37, 17 October 2011 (UTC)

Given it was a Russian speaking in English, or a bad translation to English of a Russian quote, I'm not surprised it reads so poorly.  ;) I will have to make a quick stop at the library to verify the quote, but that may not happen today. Thanks for the review! Resolute 19:09, 17 October 2011 (UTC)
Sounds good. If nothing's found then the quote can always be shortened to anything that needs to be tweaked can be. Wizardman Operation Big Bear 15:26, 20 October 2011 (UTC)
Bah, forgot to comment last night... The quote in the article is verbatim from the book referenced. I double checked it last night, and it is accurate as presented. However, if you think using only part of the quote would help the article, feel free to make a change as desired. Thanks! Resolute 15:36, 20 October 2011 (UTC)
Since it's verbatim I won't worry about it, and as a result I'll pass the article. Wizardman Operation Big Bear 16:19, 21 October 2011 (UTC)

Outshooting ?[edit]

This was (still is ?) significant for North American Ice Hockey, but not a way to measure the Soviet Union's Ice Hockey style as of 1981. Whilst the puck usually was shot across the blue line in NHL (& WHA etc), the Soviet's build all their play on extreme interaction. Typically, just before the blue line, the puck was delivered sideways or slightly backward even, just a few feet from the blue line, to a team mate who came from behind with much higher speed. That player then came very close to the goal in a second or two. If he didn't score, or wanted to try at least, he could play it to a third player who scored in a way that made it to look real easy. Well, something like that anyways. Apparently more effective, also on the narrow North American rinks. But it was all built up around the CSKA Moscow team. Which like the National team was coached by Tikhonov. (Before him Tarasov and another Moscow team) After every season, the best players from all other Soviet Union clubs, were invited to play for CSKA Moscow (the Army's team). An honor to most, but for instance Balderis wanted to remain in his (Latvian) Dynamo Riga. If he was forced or persuaded, I don't know. But after he returned to Riga, his time in the National team was finished. Some 300+ days a year the CSKA Moscow players were living, playing and training together. All for the "good cause". That way they learned to "know" where their team mates were at the precise time. Extreme interaction. Sometimes it didn't work (and Czeckoslovakia were able to defeat them some times, but for instance Sweden and Finland rarely had a chance. Not when "the extreme interaction" worked. And this was especially about how to enter offensive zone.
By the way, during the World Championships in Gothenburg, Sweden, during the spring of this year - 1981, Sweden (the home team, the becoming Silver medalists, the runners-up, the second best team, etc) had 0-0 until the middle of the second period. Final result ? Sweden - Soviet Union 1 - 13 ! Unforgettable ! And one must after all admire them for this way of playing Ice Hockey. Boeing720 (talk) 21:40, 1 January 2018 (UTC)