Talk:Adulterant

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Comment 1[edit]

The act of mixing undesirable substances in food is called food adulteration. It causes serious health hazards as the adulterants have harmful effects on the body

Ill Effects of Adulteration

   Adulteration affects the quality of the food
   Adulterants like non-permissible food colours result in allergic reactions in the body
   Argemone oil is very toxic and causes dropsy(collection of body fluid in some parts of the body)
   Adultrants like water in milk, jaggery in honey,renders the food item highly contaminative
   Adultrants like chalk powder, stones, clay balls and iron fillingsare not digestible and cause mechanical damage to the internal lining of stomach and intestine 

—The preceding unsigned comment was added by 59.88.25.220 (talkcontribs).


Chicory and Adulterant?[edit]

The article starts off telling the reader that adulterants should not be in the substance they are mixed in with, which seems true enough to the definition of the word, but then chicory is included as a coffee adulterant. Was there ever an incident of chicory being put into coffee to 'get one over on' the drinkers of the coffee? If you want chicory in your coffee, it is not an adulterant. It's an additive or flavoring or what have you, but not an adulterant. --Geofferic (talk) 02:46, 16 November 2008 (UTC)

In the early 1850s coffee sold in London, as guaranteed to be free of chicory, was found to consist of little else. (Arthur Slater The Vinegar Brewing Industry in Industrial Archaeology August 1970 referencing Arthur Hill Hassall Food and Its Adulterations 1855.) Nowadays the use of chicory as an adulterant may be rare, and where as with the Scottish product Camp Coffee it is clearly labelled it is not legally an adulterant, although some coffee drinkers might regard it as such.Twinch9 (talk) 14:31, 9 April 2009 (UTC)

Illegal? Wrong. Adulteration is often legislated[edit]

I think it is incorrect to assert adulteration is necessarily "illegal".

In Australia (and therefore presumably most everywhere) many "medicines" MUST BY LAW be adulterated.

The most obviously well-known example is "pure" ethanol; it may not be sold without adulteration to make it unpalatable.

Likewise over-the-counter opioids may not be sold without adulteration; for example, codeine preparations must include "adulterants" such as paracetamol or aspirin. Substances included not for therapeutic reasons, but to willfully poison those who would seek to misuse the opioid. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 49.180.120.236 (talk) 03:12, 20 January 2014 (UTC)

Rice section[edit]

On 19th of May 2015 AVA (food safty authority in Singapore) stated that so far they did not received any feedback about Fake rice, made of plastic. [1] - Therefore I was looking for other places or articles about this topic. Not sure this article can be expanded with this topic.

I just did some small search:

I also found the term: Adulterant, maybe it's better to add the above stuff to this article and only do a: See also section within Fake food. Opinions on this? --Never stop exploring (talk) 07:17, 20 May 2015 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "Fake rice made of plastic reported to have reached Asian shores but not Singapore's". Retrieved 20 May 2015.

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