Talk:Armenian Heritage Park

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From BostonPark. I also tried and my edits were also not accepted. But not sure why because we're providing the accurate description of Armenian Heritage Park on the Greenway and depend on Wikipedia for providing accurate information. We appreciate, however, the caution by which you except edits. We hope the following links serve to corroborate the edits made Thank you. Friends of Armenian Heritage Park/Communications Committee

To confirm the description recently submitted

Armenian Heritage Park, Boston, Massahusetts http://www.armenianheritagepark.org/Pages/default.aspx

Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy, Boston, Massachusetts http://www.rosekennedygreenway.org/parks/armenian-heritage-park/

City of Boston/Boston Arts Commission http://www.publicartboston.com/content/armenian-heritage-park-0 Hi, can some one please help me make these edits to the Armenian Heritage Park page? There are inaccuracies. I've made them several times and it doesn't stick! thank you!

Armenian Heritage Park is located on Parcel 13 of the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway between Faneuil Hall Marketplace and Christopher Columbus Park in Boston, Massachusetts.[1]

Armenian Heritage Park includes two features to engage all ages. An Abstract Sculpture, a split dodecahedron, that commemorates the immigrant experience.[2] Annually, the Abstract Sculpture is reconfigured. symbolic of all who pulled away from their country of origin and came to these Massachusetts shores, establishing themselves in new and different ways. In late March, a crane lifts and pulls apart the two halves of the split dodecahedron, made of steel and aluminum, and reshapes the two halves of the geometric shape into a new and different Abstract Sculpture. There are 24-26 different configurations, which symbolize the dispersion and coming together of immigrants from different shores.[3] The Abstract Sculpture is dedicated to lives lost during the Armenian Genocide of 1915-1923 and all genocides that follow.

The Abstract Sculpture sits atop a Reflecting Pool; its waters wash over its sides and re-emerge as a single jet of water at the Labyrinth’s center. The Labyrinth, a circular winding path paved in grass and inlaid stone, celebrates life's journey. A single jet of water marks its center, representing hope and rebirth. Art, Service, Science and Commerce are etched around its circle in tribute to contributions made to American life and culture.

The Armenian Heritage Foundation, composed of 45 Armenian-American religious, cultural, and other organizations from around Massachusetts, raised from $5 million[5] to $6 million[6] to construct the Park and to support endowed public programs including the Park's ongoing care.

The groundbreaking ceremony on May 22, 2012 was attended by Governor Deval Patrick, His Holiness Karekin II, Catholicos of All Armenians, Registrar of Motor Vehicles Rachel Kaprielian, Sheriff of Middlesex County Peter Koutoujian, Boston Mayor Thomas Menino and many Armenian-American citizens and City and Commonwealth officials.[7] Governor Patrick said that the park will be a "beautiful addition to the Greenway as well as a testament to the heritage of Armenian-Americans and Massachusetts' larger immigrant history".[7] Mayor Menino also noted that the park "celebrates the distinctive history of the City of Boston and the generations of immigrants who have made Boston the wonderfully diverse community it is today".[7]

Construction of the park was expected to be completed within 12 months,[7] but actually lasted over a year and the park was opened on May 22, 2012.[8] Armenian Minister of Foreign Affairs Eduard Nalbandyan and Governor Deval Patrick joined hundreds of attendees from the Armenian community at the dedication of the park.[9]

In "On the Greenway, public arts that feels alive", Joanna Weiss, columnist for The Boston Globe, Opinion, April 11, 2015 wrote, "The Abstract Sculpture at Armenian Heritage Park "might well be the gem of the Greenway so far; an example of public art that is both permanent and alive". — Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.118.36.175 (talk) 07:00, 5 December 2015 (UTC) 98.118.36.175 (talk) 19:38, 6 December 2015 (UTC) 98.118.36.175 (talk) 19:44, 6 December 2015 (UTC)

  • The copy above reads as advertising material, which it is. Let's start with the article as it is. What, specifically, in the article is wrong? With what is wrong, can you provide cites, preferably to secondary sources that shows what the right information is? --Hammersoft (talk) 21:25, 9 December 2015 (UTC)

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