Talk:Atlantic 252

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I have just found amongst my old collection of tapes atlantic 252 first official tx 1-9-89

I haven't added it to the page, but the one thing I remember most about Atlantic 252 was the fact that, at least in later years, they played music at a much higher pitch than normal. This practice has been adopted by other stations but 252 initially drew my attention to it. Karsini 00:36, 25 July 2006 (UTC)

This is true, I believe the practice of upping the pitches to get through the songs quicker originated with Atlantic (some songs were really badly affected by this) but I can't source it anywhere online so it can't go in the article unfortunately. It is true that other stations have copied the idea but its far less obvious now than it used to be. NKTP 23:27, 13 May 2007 (UTC)

The station was at the time popular on the West coast of Wales > at the time coverage by UK FM stations was very poor so the inferior quality of LW didnt matter much. Dont think that is relevent to the article though.

Didn't the quality of LW and fewer radios being produced with LW not contribute to the decline of 252? Does this deserve a mention? PMBO 12:51, 20 May 2007 (UTC)

Yes indeed. Decline in quality and higher quality in other areas added.  :-) Mapmark 3 June 07

Any chance somebody (either Karsini, or someone else) can upload your recordings of Atlantic 252? I don't mean to Wikipedia, but to the Internet in general.  -- J7n (talk) 03:04, 24 June 2008 (UTC)

[[Enda Caldwell writes: There are a number of tribute sites to Atlantic 252 online if you search for them. Also I have recordings of the station but I won't be uploading them online. The "fewer radios being produced with LW not contribute to the decline of 252" is not 100% relevant to the article as LW radios are still standard options on most car radios today in 2009. Atlantic 252 pitched up the songs 2.5% - 3.5% on the Denon 901F CD players. If you get the manual for these machines it will explain how this alteration is made to them. from 1998-2002 most of the songs on Atlantic 252 went out at 0.0% /normal pitch due to the new playout system RCS Master Control and the format changes also to the station meaning this was not as much required.Enda Caldwell--Enda Caldwell (talk) 18:27, 2 February 2009 (UTC)

Presenters[edit]

This list is long and rather trivial so I moved it to talk RJFJR (talk) 19:05, 5 August 2011 (UTC)

The presenters that worked at Atlantic 252 were what made the station so popular and different. The funny names idea originated in the USA at stations like WHTZ FM Z100. Many of the original presenter line-up came from Laser 558/UK Commercial Radio and BBC Radio One. The Irish presenters on the air came from Dublin Superpirates like Sunshine 101 and SuperQ 102.

On-air identity[edit]

This list is long and rather trivial so I moved it to talk RJFJR (talk) 19:05, 5 August 2011 (UTC)

Station straplines included:

  • "The Best Music"
  • "Today's Best Music Variety"
  • "Today's Best Music Mix"
  • "The Big Mix Of Today's Hits"
  • "Today's Hits Nonstop"
  • "Real Music, Real Radio"
  • "Nonstop Rhythm and Dance"

Other frequently used phrases on the station were:

  • "we've got another Long Wave of nonstop hits on the way"
  • "this is the radio station with a wavelength all of its own"
  • The station had a sung jingle package called "Euro-Power".
  • The last station jingle package was a re-sing of the WKTU New York 1997 package.

A couple of jingles for the station featured the voice of Mike Judge as Butthead, from his famous show Beavis and Butthead. These were around the mid-nineties time.

Station voices included: Larry Thompson (first station imaging voice), Gary Gears, Bumper Morgan, Henry Owens, Merkle, Bill Cunningham (aka Wild Bill), Olga Kinsman (Whisper), Paul Bacon, David Kaye, Eddy Temple-Morris, Claire Sturgess (who was produced by Cameron Prudames & Eric Murphy) and Clara Lane (last station imaging voice).

Semi-protected edit request on 17 August 2015[edit]

At 8am on 1 September 1989, Gary King announced on Atlantic 252, "Mine is the first voice you will ever hear on Atlantic 252." This was followed by a specially produced pre-recorded introduction tape that introduced everybody employed by the radio station on its launch day, from engineers, administration, management like Travis Baxter and John Catlett, and the station's personality music presenter lineup including ex-Laser 558 presenter Charlie Wolf, MaryEllen O'Brien, Andrew Turner, Nicky Schiller, Henry Owens, Al Dunne, Tony West and Jeff Graham. An appearance was even made by Rosalyn Reilly – who was to remain the station's cleaning lady for its entire twelve-year history. Barryscott1 (talk) 13:30, 17 August 2015 (UTC)

Red question icon with gradient background.svg Not done: it's not clear what changes you want to be made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. Ivanvector 🍁 (talk) 15:49, 17 August 2015 (UTC)