Talk:Boeing P-26 Peashooter

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First line is misleading[edit]

I'm sure it's not intentional but the first line reads as though the P-26 was the first all-metal fighter, rather than the first all-metal fighter to be used by the US Navy. The first all-metal monoplane fighter was the Junkers J 2. Anyone want to have a stab at reworking it?Flanker235 (talk) 07:52, 7 February 2012 (UTC)

I inserted "American" as in first American all-metal fighter. Thanks for the note. Binksternet (talk) 15:58, 7 February 2012 (UTC)

The paragraph starting with 'The diminutive "Peashooter"' ...[edit]

This paragraph is a demonstrably ungenerous appraisal of the P-26. When it first flew in 1932 it was one of the most advanced fighters in the world. Most of its contemporaries were biplanes with fixed landing gear, open cockpits and wire bracing. In fact, European countries would introduce new biplane fighters after the introduction of the P-26 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_51, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gloster_Gladiator). The 1930s were a period of rapid development in aviation, and by the time the Hurricane and BF-109 were introduced, the P-26 was being superseded by the P-35 and P-36 therefore the P-26 should not be considered contemporaneous with the Hurricane and BF-109 in this context. This entire paragraph should be removed as it is misleading, represents an unsourced opinion and adds nothing of value otherwise to the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Mynode (talkcontribs) 18:32, 6 March 2013 (UTC)

P-26 designations[edit]

Hi there, I was wondering if anyone knew what the numbers tailing the p-26 meant...


For example, the p-26 33-123 or 33-125... what do those last 5 numbers refer to or mean?

Please sign your posts, thanks. MilborneOne (talk) 17:24, 17 April 2015 (UTC)
The numbers are the United States military aircraft serials, I have added a link to the article. MilborneOne (talk) 17:24, 17 April 2015 (UTC)

Incorrect info in "Replicas/reproductions" section?[edit]

Regarding the following two entries in the "Replicas/reproductions" section:

  • The San Diego Air and Space Museum has made a reproduction of an early model to Boeing's plans with the original design's "streamlined tailwheel" and without flaps and the crossover exhaust that were later additions. In addition, Mayocraft Inc., completed the final assembly in September 2006, and it went on display in June, 2011 after nearly 12 years of construction.[1][2]

All of the information I can find indicates that the San Diego Air and Space Museum reproduction (a P-26A) was built in-house by volunteers. I can find no mention of Mayocraft involvement with the project on the San Diego museum website nor can I find any mention of the San Diego museum on the Mayocraft site. The Mayocraft replica is the P-26D referenced in the second item which they sold to the Military Aviation Museum. The completion and display dates also seem to be confused based on what I've read. I'm guessing that someone may have done some cutting and pasting and mixed these two items up.

Also, I found these comments purportedly from Jerry Orr, the lead for building the San Diego P-26, which indicate that their repro did include the flaps (in contradiction to the info in the Wikipedia article):

"There are only two original P-26s left in the world. One is in the Smithsonian and one in Chino California at the Planes of Fame museum. THEY FLY THEIRS IN THEIR AIRSHOWS. It sounds like it is tearing the air apart with short stacks and a very long propeller for that engine. I am building one at the San Diego Air and Space Museum. We are building an early version that does have later added flaps and tail wheal. We have been at it for over 10 years. We are building it to Boeing plans just like the did in the early 1930s. Boeing sold them to the Army for $9999. Come down to the basement and see how much we have done." [1]

I didn't want to do any wholesale changes without checking here first to see if there was was something that I was missing. Please advise if you have any pertinent info. GDW13 (talk) 08:57, 5 May 2015 (UTC)

References

  1. ^ "P-26 Projects." Mayocraft. Retrieved: 17 March 2007.
  2. ^ ""Peashooter" fighter goes on display in San Diego" San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved: 30 March 2015.
  3. ^ "P-26 Peashooter." Military Aviation Museum. Retrieved: 31 May 2013.

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External links modified (January 2018)[edit]

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Why peashooter[edit]

why is it called a peashooter and it has no info on armament — Preceding unsigned comment added by 187.107.234.37 (talk) 16:43, 10 September 2018 (UTC)

Did your read the bit in the Specifications section about guns and bombs? MilborneOne (talk) 17:24, 10 September 2018 (UTC)