Talk:Braille Patterns

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Move discussion in progress[edit]

There is a move discussion in progress on Talk:C0 controls and basic Latin which affects this page. Please participate on that page and not in this talk page section. Thank you. —RM bot 08:16, 6 October 2010 (UTC)

Chart[edit]

On my WinXP FF 3.6.17 system, the dot patterns are not shown in the chart - the "no glyph" glyph appears. But http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Unicode_characters#Braille_patterns shows the dot patterns. I suggest either copying that diagram, or linking to that diagram next to this diagram. 94.30.84.71 (talk) 20:24, 18 June 2011 (UTC)

The "Braille Glyph" column in the Braille ASCII values" section of the "Braille ASCII" page (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Braille_ASCII#Braille_ASCII_values) does a nice job of showing both dots and empty dot positions. I'd suggest emulating that. RichMorin (talk) 21:42, 14 February 2016 (UTC)

query about Mac Font[edit]

How did y'all get the page to render on the Mac without the empty circles? I can't find anything in the CSS that would activate this, but it'd be great to have on my own braille outputted webpages. Thanks -- Michael Scott Cuthbert (talk) 16:29, 22 August 2011 (UTC)

I have a Macbook Pro with MacOS Snow Leopard and it ships with four different Braille fonts with choices for 6 or 8 points and circles or small dots. Therefore, I feel the statement about MacOSX's Braille Pattern fonts is inaccurate. --Ahyangyi (talk) 04:56, 24 February 2012 (UTC)

Requested move[edit]

The following discussion is an archived discussion of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on the talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

The result of the move request was: moved to Braille Patterns. Consensus at Talk:C0 Controls and Basic Latin#Unicode block names clear and comparatively recent. Favonian (talk) 21:52, 2 March 2012 (UTC)


Braille pattern blockBraille Patterns

This page was moved [1] from name Braille Patterns. I propose to move it back. The old name was correct and discussed into consensus. First, the old name is exactly the name of the Unicode block: braille patterns, and what this page is about. The naming was discussed at Talk:C0 Controls and Basic Latin#Unicode block names, which may count as an explicit consensus. The consensus is, that a page title of a Unicode block should be the exact block name (for all Unicode block pages). And since there is no ambiguity with the page name, no disambiguation addition is needed (like "(Unicode)"). Irrelevant now, but noteworthy, is that the current name "Braille pattern block" is not a crisp description of the topic (prior knowledge required to understand the name). Of course the redirect should cross too. -DePiep (talk) 17:35, 24 February 2012 (UTC)

The above discussion is preserved as an archive of a requested move. Please do not modify it. Subsequent comments should be made in a new section on this talk page. No further edits should be made to this section.

Why?[edit]

Why was this added to Unicode? Isn't Braille just a different way to write the same letters? Especially if Unicode defines them as symbols, doesn't this go against the "no extra code points for glyphs" rule? RedNifre (talk) 21:21, 27 March 2015 (UTC)

No, Braille is its own writing system. Although it can be used as a one-to-one cipher, in normal practice, braille abbreviates words, excludes implied elements, and uses symbols contextually - eg, the same pattern used for the exclamation mark stands for a double "ff" in the middle of a word. There are also several different "grades" of abbreviation and implication in many languages, so the same text would be encoded in Braille differently in Grade 1 English Braille than in Grade 3 English Braille. It also is language dependent - the same braille pattern can be used to indicate different letters, depending on the language being written, and the same letters can be indicated with different patterns dependent on the language being written. So it would be inappropriate to encode braille as a cipher of any other symbol, and this isn't even a very close call in the world of Unicode. VanIsaacWScont 22:09, 27 March 2015 (UTC)