Talk:Carbon disulfide

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More Hazard Information Needed[edit]

This material (and others) should be incorporated into the article:

Major Hazards
Extremely flammable, volatile liquid; vapors are readily ignited by hot surfaces.
Toxicity
Carbon disulfide is only slightly toxic to laboratory animals by inhalation or ingestion, but its toxicity is relatively greater in humans. Exposure to 5000 ppm of carbon disulfide for 15 minutes can be fatal to humans. Carbon disulfide may also exert its toxic effects after absorption through skin. By all routes of exposure, carbon disulfide affects the central nervous system. Overexposure to carbon disulfide may cause headache, dizziness, fatigue, muscle weakness, numbness, nervousness, or psychological disturbances. Contact of the liquid or high concentrations of carbon disulfide vapor with the eyes may cause irritation. Skin contact can also cause rash or skin irritation. Carbon disulfide is regarded as a substance with good warning properties.
Chronic exposure to relatively high concentrations of carbon disulfide may cause the central nervous system effects described above. In addition, chronic overexposure to carbon disulfide causes increased atherosclerosis, leading to risk of cardiovascular disease. Prolonged exposure of female workers to low concentrations of carbon disulfide has been associated with birth defects in offspring; exposure limit values provide little margin of safety for risk of developmental effects. Carbon disulfide has not been found to be a carcinogen in humans.

From http://www.franciechase.com/projects/ehs/lcss/lcss_pg4.html JKeck (talk) 21:58, 21 July 2010 (UTC)

You are correct that this compound is dangerous. That sort information is provided better and more authoritatively in the MSDS, so we in WP-Chem decided a long time ago to minimize reproducing that information. Also if we encouraged this kind of information, the articles would be one long essay about hazards and consequences. --Smokefoot (talk) 00:57, 22 July 2010 (UTC)

Metal and superconductor phases[edit]

According to [1] doi:10.1073/pnas.1305129110 it's possible with pressure to turn CS2 into a magnetic metallic conductor, and with more pressure and lowered temperatures it turns into a superconductor. This should be added into the physics of CS2 -- 65.94.79.6 (talk) 06:45, 3 July 2013 (UTC)