Talk:Compact Cassette

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Former featured article Compact Cassette is a former featured article. Please see the links under Article milestones below for its original nomination page (for older articles, check the nomination archive) and why it was removed.
Main Page trophy This article appeared on Wikipedia's Main Page as Today's featured article on October 27, 2006.
Article milestones
Date Process Result
September 14, 2006 Peer review Reviewed
October 8, 2006 Featured article candidate Promoted
April 20, 2009 Featured article review Demoted
Current status: Former featured article

Cassette tape scratching[edit]

I heard that cassette tapes can be "scratched" just like doing vinyl scratching. Any info on cassette tape scratching is welcome. Komitsuki (talk) 15:39, 8 December 2012 (UTC)

Tape Tea[edit]

In my country (Brazil), there are people, usually homeless people or drug-abusing men, that boils the tape to extract the chemicals and then drinking the beverage to get high. The liquid is called "Tape Tea" (“Chá de Fita”) and some people (with very good reasons) think it is brain-damaging. With more and more old tapes being disposed, the ill practice achieved a peak on its use. Should it be noted on this Wikipedia Article? 189.77.162.33 (talk) 17:24, 28 June 2013 (UTC)

Interesting, but only if you can reliably source it. Chaheel Riens (talk) 21:35, 28 June 2013 (UTC)

Lou Ottens and his team[edit]

I was astonished that the work leading to both the compact cassette and the compact disc and the inventors/designers behind them is not well documented yet. I suggest a page about Lou Ottens as a first step. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.211.236.148 (talk) 02:40, 29 August 2013 (UTC)

Note we have an interview with Ottens which would be a lovely source on the early days of the compact cassette - David Gerard (talk) 12:19, 3 September 2013 (UTC)

Correct title: Compact cassette[edit]

No capitalization is required in the title. The correct title for this article is Compact cassette. Any objections to a move?--Wetman (talk) 19:37, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Objection here. It was a brand name,a proper name for a particular standard for audio tape. It's rather like "personal computer" vs. "Personal Computer" - you can only get the second one from IBM. --Wtshymanski (talk) 20:03, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Sony's new tapes[edit]

Would Sony's new tapes fit into this article? I believe they were announced yesterday, 5 may 2014. Here are two links to describe them:

http://www.latimes.com/business/technology/la-fi-tn-sony-185-tb-cassette-tape-storage-record-20140505-story.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangelho/2014/05/04/think-the-cassette-tape-is-dead-then-why-did-sony-just-cram-148tb-of-data-onto-one/ — Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.33.4.204 (talk) 22:33, 6 May 2014 (UTC)

Like Digital Compact Cassette, they'd probably get their own article if they get any play beyond the announcement - David Gerard (talk) 11:32, 7 May 2014 (UTC)
Though most articles that quote this press release use a picture of a compact cassette as illustration, the actual product is most likely very unlike the compact cassette, and probably just a new format of Digital Linear Tape. Jac Goudsmit (talk) 18:03, 25 November 2015 (UTC)

Manufacturers[edit]

I was curious how many cassette tape manufacturers were still in business, and if it's a small number, who they are. It might be interesting to have a graph of the number of manufacturers worldwide over time. -- Beland (talk) 14:13, 18 July 2014 (UTC)

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Changed Dutch to Belgian invention.[edit]

[1] Quote: Rijk van geworden zeker?, vroegen we. Nee dus. En daar had Roos nog nooit bij stilgestaan. Op de patenten prijkt de naam van haar vader, maar de winsten gingen naar Philips. Translation: Profits went to Philips -a dutch company- where Mestdagh worked, but on the patents it clearly states Gilbert Mestdagh is the inventor.[2] [3] 83.101.80.250 (talk) 08:20, 24 October 2015 (UTC)

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Cassette types[edit]

"The recording 'bias' equalizations also were different (and had a much longer time constant). "

Scrambled information. The bias is not equalization. It has no time constant. Equalization is used on recording and playback. Bias, a completely different thing, is used on recording only. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 139.68.134.1 (talk) 21:27, 2 May 2016 (UTC)

Low freqiuency equalisation[edit]

As well as the high frequency (70/120 uS) equalisation. Low frequency (1590/3180 uS) equalisation is used. All cassettes decks manufactured before 1970 used 1590 uS while those manufactured after 1974 use 3180 uS. Equipment manufactured between those two years used 1590uS for Ferric (IEC Type 1) cassettes and 3180 uS for all other types. Eq standards for open reel tapes varied according to tape speed [1] As for High frequency equalisation Ferric (IEC Type 1) gennerally used 120 uS and 70uS was used for all other types but there were some exceptions such as some Chrome/Cobolt cassettes (manufactured by BASF) designed for 120 uS and pre-recorded musiccassettes which alwaysd used 120us regardless of tape type. 86.175.231.58 (talk) 16:17, 22 July 2017 (UTC)

Maximum cassette length[edit]

The article mentions TDK C180 (1.5 hours per side) cassettes but there were also C240 cassettes. Most equipment manufacturers did not recommend the use of C120 (or longer) cassettes as the thin tape was liable to streaching, breaking and print through (echo). — Preceding unsigned comment added by 86.175.231.58 (talk) 05:23, 22 July 2017 (UTC)



                                          NAMA CLAN:THEG AMERSLK
      ANGGOTA CLAN:

1.FAHRI 2.HAFIZ 3.TIDAK TAHU 4.TIDAK TAHU




                         °—° ←×→ ≠≠×ק§§≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠≠§§§§§§  — Preceding unsigned comment added by 36.68.133.168 (talk) 11:47, 30 August 2016 (UTC) 

Tape construction complexity[edit]

Compact cassettes varied a lot in the number of parts. They could have as few as eleven - 2 spools, 2 leader clips, tape and leaders (or just tape with no leaders), 2 snap together shell halves with integral roller pins (no slip liners, open window slots), 2 rollers and 1 pressure pad with spring. Or they could have as many as twenty-four - 2 spools, 2 leader clips, tape and leaders (or just tape with no leaders), 2 screw together shell halves, 2 clear window inserts, 5 screws, 2 slip liners, 2 metal roller pins, 2 rollers, 2 sliding write protect tabs and 1 pressure pad with spring. The intrduction of all-clear shells removed the need for clear window inserts, reducing the high-end parts count to twenty-two. Counting the tape, leaders and splices increases the parts count, especially with tapes using multi-segmented leaders made with different materials. There was another style made that had spools made like miniature reel-to-reel spools. Those didn't use slip liners and always had all clear shells to show off the miniature spools. I've never owned one of that type so I don't know how the spools are made to know their number of parts. An exploded view image of both a cheap and a high end compact cassette showing the different number of components would be a good addition to this article. It could also be used to say something about the much higher cost of albums on audio CD VS Cassette when by parts count, complexity and time to produce each tape (given that even with "high speed" duplication each cassette took far longer to replicate than the practically instant replication of a CD) a Compact Cassette had to cost more to manufacture. Bizzybody (talk) 05:25, 5 January 2017 (UTC)

Cassette tape manufacturing[edit]

A short video showing some of the methods used to manufacture tapes at National Audio Company https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMTpvr9HXeI Bizzybody (talk) 05:31, 5 January 2017 (UTC)

Antitheft packaging.[edit]

I never found it to inhibit browsing and this is the first time I've heard anyone complain about it. *shrug* That sounds like a silly supposition, that it hurt sales.

I grew up in the late 80's/early 90s and bought only cassettes.  :-S — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.189.221.29 (talk) 17:51, 22 March 2017 (UTC)

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Audio data and video[edit]

As well as audio and data there have been attempts ar recording monochrome video (see PXL-2000 ) onto cassette tape. Strictly speaking Phillips (holders of the "Compact cassette" trademarks and patents) regarded such things as "Teddy Ruxpin" storytelling dolls, Data recording, Video recording, Tascam portastudio, 4 track recording, double (or half) speed recording and even (initially) some noise reduction systems (e.g. Dolby) and high bias tape formulations as "non-standard" formats which threatened to undermine the universal compatability of the compact cassette formats. In later years they took the same view of "copy protected" and other non-standard optical discs projibiting the use of the "compact disc" trademark. 86.175.231.58 (talk) 18:24, 22 July 2017 (UTC)

Lifetime etc...[edit]

Dear writer,

What I miss in the article is information about the lifetime of the Compact Cassette.

This means once how many times can you "rewrite" such a tape before the quality is unusable?

Twice How much time does it take before the content of the tape has withered so far that the tape is unusable?

Regards.

J.P. (Jan) Clifford 145.129.136.48 (talk) 17:54, 3 August 2017 (UTC)

It would be useful information to have. The trouble is a) sourcing it to a reliable source and b) the fact that there were and are a huge variety of both cassettes and decks out there, some of much better quality than others. Some of the tapes are much more subject to "wearing out" than others, and some of the decks put a lot more wear on the tape than others.
I can tell you with near certainty that it's not the "writing" to the tape, just the mechanical process of passing it through the deck. The magnetic domains don't care how many times they're flipped back and forth; a "play pass" wears out the tape exactly as much as a "record pass" does. Either way the tape is dragged through a (sometimes roughly made) cassette shell, made to make a couple of sharp turns, turns around pulleys that are not necessarily smooth nor smoothly-turning, dragged across a tape head while being pressed against the head by a felt "pressure pad" with greatly varying pressure (unless you have one of a few very expensive decks), pressed between the capstan and the pinch roller, and finally, usually, wound and unwound quickly between a pair of "slip sheets", which are supposed to be very smooth and low-friction but... again of varying quality.
And there is aging of the materials, which happens even if the cassette is put on the shelf and never run through a machine. Some "new old stock" cassettes are unusable today due to this. With some the magnetic material will shed the first time they're tried. Others have gathered mold, and in still others the "binder" (glue) that holds the mag. stuff to the tape has gone bad in various other ways. But like the "pass wear" it varies widely with the quality of the materials, the manufacturing process, and of course the storage conditions (heat and humidity are the big variations).
Given all that, I can't imagine how anyone could have credibly claimed any specific figures for either shelf lifetime or pass wear that could be applied to all tapes used in all machines. The variables could easily cause at least a factor of five range of results: I've had cassettes that went bad within a few years of purchase; I have some today that are working fine that I know date from the 70s (because TDK changed their label design in the 80s). But even if we were to state something like "the expected lifetime of a cassette varies greatly depending on...", we'd need to find reliable sources for that.
Maybe there are some audio enthusiast blogs out there whose owners or participants might remember where there's good info on cassette lifetime. But... it's unlikely anybody is researching and publishing much of that stuff today. So it wouldn't necessarily apply to tapes you buy today. (If you can find any!)
Still, thanks for the suggestion. Info on lifetime (even on the difficulty of citing a lifetime) would be completely valid to add, if it can be reliably sourced. Jeh (talk) 18:13, 3 August 2017 (UTC)
Thank you very much for your extensive story. I guess you are right and it's main reason is that it is a consumer product. The DAT tapes for storing computer-data a much more and better documented! But then you address profession!

145.129.136.48 (talk) 13:00, 7 August 2017 (UTC)

Reverted my edits[edit]

I disagree. Most people looking up information on cassettes, including my millennial daughter would "love" (and she did) to know this upfront. I will change what i did to make it less detailed, but it is important to know in the introduction. Drycroft4 (talk) 07:00, 9 August 2017 (UTC)

It is too detailed for the lead, especially in the first paragraph. It was also inaccurate, as some recordable cassettes have a sliding tab for write protection. If you can fit that all in with one fairly short sentence, I'd be impressed. - BilCat (talk) 07:05, 9 August 2017 (UTC)
Color me impressed. Good job keeping it succinct and to the point. - BilCat (talk) 07:58, 9 August 2017 (UTC)

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