Talk:Five-spice powder

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WikiProject Food and drink / Herbs and Spices (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
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WikiProject China (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
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No star anise[edit]

This recipe has no star anise in it! this is the main ingredient in chinese five spice powder! I'll change it when I get my recipe book.

star anise pods[edit]

What is a star anise "pod"? is it an entire star? or just one "point" of the star. Or is it just one of the little seeds? And are we supposed to use just the seeds or the shell as well? dave 08:29, 6 Dec 2004 (UTC)

Tsao-ko[edit]

Isn't Black cardamom (tsao-ko/cǎoguǒ) an ingredient in some five-spice mixtures? Badagnani 00:42, 11 October 2006 (UTC)

Cinnamon[edit]

The cassia/cinnamon text in this article is muddled and confusing; it also includes redundant links. --belg4mit —Preceding unsigned comment added by 130.64.34.249 (talk) 23:55, 27 September 2007 (UTC)

Relationship with garam masala[edit]

What is the relationship between five-spice powder and Garam masala or Advieh? When did it first enter Chinese cuisine, and from where? Is it possible it came with Persian influence in the Tang Dynasty? Badagnani 22:53, 6 November 2007 (UTC)

  • Interesting. While speculation isn't possible on Wikipedia, linking to similar powders from neighboring culture and leaving the judgement to the the reader could work. I've never seen any five-spice powder using turmeric though, since if anything has turmeric we call it "curry" :D Ahyangyi (talk) 07:10, 3 October 2016 (UTC)

"The five basic flavors of Chinese cooking"[edit]

These might be the five flavors known to scientists, but they are not the traditional five commonly known in Oriental cooking. If I'm not mistaken, umami is not among them, and "hot" (the flavor of cayenne pepper) is. Unfree (talk) 03:50, 27 December 2007 (UTC)

That would be what I know as well. Hot or spicy, not savory/umami. Perpetual siel (talk) 16:45, 15 August 2008 (UTC)

Cake use[edit]

Here in Britain, 5 spice powder is also used as a cake flavouring. Not one of the most popular ones, but pretty yum. 82.31.207.100 (talk) 16:22, 22 April 2010 (UTC)

Japanese reading...[edit]

The symbols are translated as "gokōfun" and have a hiragana reading as (ごこうふん) --24.193.1.9 (talk) 18:42, 28 August 2011 (UTC)

Cassia sold as cinnamon?[edit]

Where is cassia sold as cinnamon? Is it in the US? In Australia, it's illegal to label cassia as cinnamon, and I'd bet that's the case in the EU too. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 124.149.178.195 (talk) 11:23, 2 September 2011 (UTC)

Recipe vs Formula[edit]

As this is a food and drink article, I propose that a more appropriate first subheading would be recipe not formula. Unless that violates some Wikipedia guideline or there is an objection, I will make that change.

--Phersh (talk) 03:36, 5 September 2017 (UTC)