Talk:Growing Pains

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[Untitled][edit]

When you're a kid its called "growing pains". When you're an adult it's called "getting old". Mintguy

How does that have anything to do with the sitcom Growing Pains? Redfarmer 05:47, 27 Nov 2004 (UTC)

Edited the information about the theme song for the final season. Verified with Jeff Thacher of Rockapella that they did not perform that version. Jude86 16:36, 31 March 2006 (UTC)

Dream/not a dream[edit]

This article says that the 1989-90 season was retconned out of existence as a dream, but Kirk Cameron says that Cameron requested that the season be turned into a dream but his request wasn't granted. What's the truth? --Metropolitan90 06:52, 6 June 2006 (UTC)

It was not a dream. --Triviaa 13:46, 13 July 2006 (UTC)
Agreed. It was not a dream. Mike (Cameron's character) did a have a dream about the wedding but it was only a small part of one show. The wedding was still going to be held as planned, but Julie left a note backing out of it. Julie also appeared again in a later episode where she and Mike discussed her decision. I'm going to remove the portion where it states, "The 1989–1990 season was retconned out of existence as a dream of Mike Seaver's ." --Wordbuilder 03:18, 25 March 2007 (UTC)

Boner Stabone[edit]

  • I don't think Boner Stabone should be merged into Growing Pains. We need to keep the main article free for wild, unhampered growth and the Boner Stabone page could be full of tons more quotes. i love that guy.--BonerJoe 21:26, 7 July 2006 (UTC)

Article Merger[edit]

I agree that Boner Stabone should be merged with the Growing Pains entry. The individual characters of the Seavers don't even have their own pages, and I don't think Boner is a strong enough minor character to merit its own entry. If anything, it should have a subcategory in Growing Pains but nothing more. --Angleterre 19:26, 14 July 2006 (UTC)


Article Merger[edit]

I absolutely agree that Boner Stabone should be merged with the Growing Pains entry. The only reason the name exists is because of Growing Pains. I mean would anyone know the guy's name if you just said "Boner" without explaining the guy from Growing Pains. No! Merge the two articles because they belong together. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 65.115.176.42 (talkcontribs) .

Boner's Merger[edit]

Merging Boner Stabone into the Growing Pains article was a good idea, but removing most of the information about Boner was not. Somebody needs to add more information on Boner in the Growing Pains page. (I have only watched a very few episodes myself and would be a poor candidate for this) Comrade Sephiroth

Very little useful information was lost. That Boner was the "clumsy friend of Mike" is perhaps the only thing that could be added, although I don't recall the clumsiness. That Koenig is Walter Koenig's son is covered in his own article, and the quotation was contextless and pointless. Powers 13:01, 22 July 2006 (UTC)

ya, he was not a major character, so there is nothing to write back. after all, there were too many different kind of characters like him who appeared in the show. SummerThunder 20:28, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

Alyssa Milano also appeared in one episode[edit]

i was watching last night one episode of Growing Pains and Alyssa Milano was Mike's partner in a fast food restaurant, Mike was working to get some money, and Alyssa Milano appeared young and with blonde hair. I think that episode is for the 1st or 2nd season. Sorry if my English is not perfect. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Roblahsen (talkcontribs) .

I think that episode had Olivia d'Abo, not Alyssa Milano.- Triviaa 21:12, 26 November 2006 (UTC)Dshibshm (talk) 22:37, 27 January 2008 (UTC)Dshibshm (talk) 22:38, 27 January 2008 (UTC)

The ending[edit]

I don't think the show got cancelled. From what I've seen years ago, the show did have a final episode and I've seen the cast hugging each other during the behind the scenes. King Shadeed 19:36, 18 December 2006 (UTC)

what u said is true. SummerThunder 20:30, 29 December 2006 (UTC)

They did have a proper finale, but did the network decide it was time to end the show and gave them proper notice or did the producers decide it was time? - Triviaa 22:46, 28 January 2007 (UTC)

Season 1 DVD[edit]

I am not so sure these are the full Broadcast versions now. I just saw the end of episode 17 "Charity Begins at Home" on tv and there was a scene at the end where the heart shaped ash tray that Ben made at school is sitting on a shelf and you hear Ben's voice say "Now no one will want me" (as if the ash tray itself is talking)...or something like that. I immediately got out the DVD and checked out the end of this episode, and there is no such scene. I really dislike studios leaving out bits and pieces on DVD releases! Does anyone know if the DVD is syndicated or broadcast versions of the episodes?

"Self satiring"?[edit]

Does that mean breaking the fourth wall, because most articles would call it by that term. Should we change it then, as most people (including me) probably don't know what it means? 24.33.95.114 23:01, 15 February 2007 (UTC)

Sorry, that last comment was mine - forgot to sign in. Kochdude388 23:03, 15 February 2007 (UTC)
I would go with "breaking the fourth wall." --Wordbuilder 03:20, 25 March 2007 (UTC)
I, too, agree. "Self-satire" isn't even correct, it's breaking the fourth wall. I'm going to go ahead and change it.72.196.98.106 06:18, 29 May 2007 (UTC)

What does breaking the fourth wall mean? I understand self-satirising, is it the same thing, is breaking the fourth wall and industry term? What are the other walls? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 173.183.70.15 (talk) 23:15, 21 December 2009 (UTC)

A typical television set has three walls, which are visible to the viewers watching at home. The "fourth wall" is only conceptually there, because if it was actually there it would block the cameras' view into the room represented by the set. When an actor "breaks" the fourth wall, he is acknowledging that it's not actually there. See fourth wall for more information. Powers T 15:09, 22 December 2009 (UTC)
I think the important part of the definition is missing in the above description "When an actor 'breaks' the fourth wall," the actor directly addresses the audience in an acknowledgement that what is happening on stage/screen is merely actors performing. MM207.69.137.26 (talk) 02:29, 13 April 2010 (UTC)

TV Airing[edit]

I believe it just started airing on The N at midnight EST. WAVY 10 20:10, 31 May 2007 (UTC)

Boner's Guest Appearance[edit]

It says that he made a guest appearance in 1992, which would be near the end of season 7. I haven't watched that far yet - is this true or a misunderstanding? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 71.221.81.147 (talk) 01:09, 7 February 2008 (UTC)

Verification needed[edit]

I have manually reverted the edits introduced by User 63.215.27.55 (contribs) on 2007-01-06 06:20 because >95% of the edits coming from that IP is vandalism. If the following sentences can be verified, please feel free to re-introduce them into the text of the article:

  • Reruns aired on the Disney Channel from 1998-2001.
  • In the second season episode "Jason's Rib", Jason asks Mike if he has seen his mom, Maggie. Mike responds, "Tall blonde, looks like Donna de Varona?". Later in the episode, Maggie asks Mike if he had seen his dad, Jason. Mike replies, "Tall man, looks like a talk show host?"
  • In the fifth-season episode "Coughing Boy", Mike gives his picture to a talent agent. After Mike leaves his interview, the talent agent looks at his photo and says, "He reminds me of a young Michael J. Fox."
  • During his early teen heartthrob days, Kirk Cameron was hailed as the "young, new Michael J. Fox".
  • In the last episode of the sixth season, Mike and Kate walk out of the wedding chapel very lovingly. The priest looks at them, and says, "They'll be back." Between the hiatus of the sixth and seventh season, Kirk Cameron and Chelsea Noble, who played Mike and Kate, got married on July 20, 1991.

--75.36.178.30 (talk) 01:39, 8 January 2009 (UTC)

Philip Seymour Hoffman appearance[edit]

I could find nothing on IMDB or anywhere else that corroborates the fact that Philip Seymour Hoffman appeared on the show as "Cousin Lou". I have removed this from the entry. Spiraledout (talk) 15:20, 30 November 2009 (UTC)

Where's the substance?[edit]

Other then the brief paragraph at the begining, this article skips right over the part where it should tell you what the show was about for seven years, and goes right on to all the misc stuff. If I was a person looking at this article and had never seen this show, I would leave still not knowing what the show was really about, what kind of direction it started off on and where it went, and why it was popular enough to be on the air for seven years. Deepintexas (talk) 14:35, 6 February 2010 (UTC)

All Wikipedia articles are works in progress. Please help us to improve the article! Powers T 15:55, 8 February 2010 (UTC)

Leonardo DiCaprio?[edit]

Near the top, there is a reference to Leo's character "Luke Brower", with a reference #1. I checked reference #1 and it does not refer to either Leonardo or Luke. I watched this show as a child, and DiCaprio wasn't famous then, but I don't remember him on it, so (a) the reference to footnote 1 should be deleted, and (b) if there is a verification reference it should be added. I'm not an experienced wikipedia editor so I'd prefer if someone else followed up on this. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.65.73.102 (talk) 18:28, 16 December 2010 (UTC)

Yes, Leonardo DiCaprio was on Growing Pains. He was in the final season, or close to it.--Splashen (talk) 03:24, 7 April 2013 (UTC)

Affluent?[edit]

More like upper-middle class.... 174.57.203.45 (talk) 03:29, 18 December 2011 (UTC)

Indeed.Surv1v4l1st (Talk|Contribs) 13:40, 23 March 2012 (UTC)

Notable guest stars[edit]

  • I removed that section because, well, in whose opinion are those particular guest stars notable? If their respective appearances on the show garnered a lot of media attention, then I could understand, but that wasn't the case. Moreover, most (if not all) of those guests are well-known now, but they guested on the show "before they were stars". (And with all due respect, Cavarrone, all the other television series articles do not have such a section.) Erpert Who is this guy? | Wanna talk about it? 21:00, 25 March 2012 (UTC)
  • I perfectly understand what are you saying, but WP:PEACOCK has nothing to do with the attribution of notable, that is an almost clear concept in WP and that reflects some specific and clear criteria for actors. I see the point that some of these actors guested on the show "before they were stars", but "notable guest stars" simply means "notable actors who are appeared in this show", with no reference to the how/when/where they became notable. And if you want other exemples of other television series articles that have these sections you can find hundreds of them, ie see this search (and yes, we have whole separate articles about notable actors on series!): [1]. As far as I can see, no editor (except you) has ever criticized that or boldy removed these sections. My best, Cavarrone (talk) 22:02, 25 March 2012 (UTC)

Awful.[edit]

This page is awful. It is full of original research. I am going to start by removing everything that does not have a source and also everything that seems to be original research. The section describing the opening credits is especially ridiculous, going on for a few paragraphs about house gags. What's worse is that house gags is in parenthesis. I'm scrapping that whole section,as it is original research.--98.87.89.147 (talk) 20:49, 19 August 2012 (UTC)

Part about Julie McCullough is untrue.[edit]

The article states, "The biggest consequence of Cameron's conversion to Christianity was the firing of actress Julie McCullough who had landed the role of nanny Julie Costello in 1989." According to Kirk Cameron's autobiography, this is false. The writers never intended to make Julie McCullough a big part of the show. She was introduced as a short-term love interest for Mike. From the beginning, the plan was for them to break up after Mike's immaturity took its natural course. Cameron cited producers of the show who back up his version of events.67.45.112.55 (talk) 22:50, 29 December 2016 (UTC)