Talk:Heart valve

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I'm making this more of a disambiguation-type page. Let it give a little insight into what the different valves are, and then point to the specific heart valve and disorders of those valves. That's why I added a lot of related topics at the bottom of the page.

For reasons I cannot explain, leaking of the atrioventricular valves (mitral & tricuspid) is called regurgitation, while leaking of the aortic & pulmonic valves is called insufficiency in the cardiology literature. They mean the same thing, and even sometimes in the literature they mix it up a little. Maybe it's a regional thing???

Subvalvular apparatus[edit]

I think that to describe the sulvalvular apparatus as to have no active part in the workings of the AV-valves is wrong. I think this is demonstrated in the valvular unsufficiency following papillary infarction. I will be back with documentation --Ekko 08:11, 15 November 2005 (UTC)


for the ease of the reader who may not have a medical background[edit]

Rather than the out of order listings, I suggest ordering the valve descriptions in the way that the circulating blood passes by them: blood enters the heart from the vena cavas into the right atrium, it passes through the (1) Tricuspid valve into right ventricle, passes the (2)Pulmonic valve to enter the Pulmonic artery and then the lungs; from the Pulmonic vein the blood reenters the left atrium, passes the (3) Mitral Valve to enter the left Ventricle and passes the (4) Aortic Valve to enter the aorta and arterial branches. 216.163.246.1 (talk) 21:06, 18 August 2008 (UTC)

  • This article isn't about describing blood flow, it is simply an overview page of the valves. The current layout is by category: a/v valves, and semilunar valves. I think this is the right format for the article because it helps the reader categorize the valves by function. Going by flow would confuse the reader because the different types of valves would continually be swapped from one valve to the next. In the heart valve article, the valves should be organized by type, not by blood flow. In the article describing blood flow, it should be as you have described. Chaldor (talk) 06:52, 19 August 2008 (UTC)

I disagree - not listing the valves in order by the direction of circulation confused me and I am a nurse! The first sentence in the article says "In anatomy, the heart valves are valves in the heart that maintain the unidirectional flow of blood by opening and closing depending on the difference in pressure on each side." The heart valves all have the same function and the article doesn't order by function, it orders the descriptions of the valves by type (AV valves are located between the right or left atria and ventricle, and the semilunar valves have a specific anatomical shape and no chordae)and then lists them in alphabetical rather than in the order that correlates to the unidirectional flow. I still think this will be much more confusing to the readers without medical backgrounds than it was to me.216.163.247.1 (talk) 18:06, 19 August 2008 (UTC)

Article Assessment for WikiProject Anatomy[edit]

Hello. I am a member of WikiProject Anatomy, a Wikipedia wide project that maintains and improves articles that fall under the scope of anatomy. Since your article has fallen under our scope, I have placed the correct templates on this talk page for verification. Upon review of this article, I'd like to make a few points, as shown:

  • Assess articles with class and importance factors
  • Needs sources

I'm glad this article could fall within our scope, and I hope to see it grow large! Many thanks! Renaissancee (talk) 21:05, 3 June 2009 (UTC)

Subvalvular apparatus[edit]

I want to add to the concern about the subvalvular apparatus having no influence on the opening and closing of the AV valves. That phrase directly contradicts an article on heart sounds http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heart_sounds where it is stated that the papillary muscles associated with the chordae tendineae assist in the closing of the valves. Swalsh243 (talk) 18:47, 7 May 2010 (UTC)swalsh243 5/7/10

Broken Link[edit]

The link "atrioventricular (AV) valves" at the summary section is not working. 175.140.102.211 (talk) 13:25, 3 June 2011 (UTC)

File:Cardiac Cycle Left Ventricle.PNG Nominated for Deletion[edit]

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Proposed merge[edit]

Hello to all! I am proposing a merge from the following articles into this article:

This is for the following reasons:

  • The main article would benefit significantly from having all this information in one place.
  • Cusps and heart valves are intrinsically linked and it makes sense to place them on a single article.
  • This knowledge shouldn't be obscured from readers of this article by virtue of being isolated in an obscure article.
  • These topics may receive more attention by being mentioned in the main article.
  • The articles, if needs be, could be re-expanded at a later date.

Kind Regards, LT910001 (talk) 02:14, 6 December 2013 (UTC)

Agree with this proposal for all of the given reasons - also as it is, it cannot be expanded on much if at all. Iztwoz (talk) 12:45, 24 December 2013 (UTC)

Error in File:Heart_anterior_large.jpg[edit]

There seems to be an error. Please check https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Commons:Deletion_requests/File:Heart_anterior_large.jpg --Sti (talk) 19:08, 26 May 2015 (UTC)

Regards[edit]

Thanks a lot for uploading a great informative video! Dr. Khyati (talk) 03:35, 9 November 2017 (UTC)