Talk:History of Russian animation

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Untitled[edit]

The names are transliterated here according to Gosstandart Rossii ST SEV 1362 of 1978, as I have come to believe it the best suited one for international use. However, transliteration is always a subject of discussion - feel free to comment. timo 09:48, 30 Oct 2004 (UTC)

I've changed the names to conform to the WP:RUS policy - I hope I didn't break any links by doing so. Esn 13:49, 21 April 2006 (UTC)

Wow[edit]

Has anyone seen THIS? Pilot Studio emptying its history, apparently. I will just say that this is one of the more depressing photography series I've seen - the screenshots there are from some of my favourite films. I would've been glad to pay for some of those and hang them up on a wall.

Also, a usefull link if you read Russian: [1] - interview with Yuriy Norshteyn about the history of the Russian animation community from the mid-1980s to today.

Also, forum thread which talks about some Russian features being made today: [2] Esn 05:22, 19 October 2006 (UTC)

Starevich[edit]

It looks like he was even more revolutionary than I'd previously thought, apparently beating Willis O'Brien by 12 years (in combining stop motion with live action). Take a look at this Russian page. Esn 11:39, 19 December 2006 (UTC)

Or this English page. ;) Esn 22:25, 7 January 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Oldmansea petrov.jpg[edit]

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Fair use rationale for Image:Nu pogodi by vjacheslav kotenochkin.jpg[edit]

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BetacommandBot (talk) 15:15, 8 March 2008 (UTC)

Some words about the non-Russian Soviet animation?[edit]

I think it might be appropriate to add some words about non-Russian Soviet animation... or perhaps it would be better to create a new article? This current article is quite Moscow-centric. Of course, that is where most of the action was for most of the time... but still, maybe it should be mentioned that the first Kazakh animated film was released in 1967, for example. Esn (talk) 09:12, 17 July 2008 (UTC)

Worker and Parasite[edit]

Nothing interesting to say, just that I always thought that Worker and Parasite was more inspired by "Surogoat" (Academy Award winner in 1961) and mostly the Zagreb school. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 76.69.181.34 (talk) 05:01, 15 August 2008 (UTC)

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Avant-garde period[edit]

The article states that "The starting point for this was Fyodor Khitruk's film History of a Crime? (1962)." It is not true. "Знакомые картинки" (1957)[3] by Evgeny Migunov and "Большие неприятности" (1961)[4] by Brumberg sisters were made earlier.

As for rotoscoping, its role is overestimated. I've seen 107 soviet animated films from 1950's, and only few of them seem rotoscoped. Huge percent of the films are tales about animals with, of course, no rotoscoping. Alone Coder (talk) 03:05, 23 September 2008 (UTC)

Help IDing old Soviet animation[edit]

I'm sorry to ask this here, but I go no usable help anywhere else and I think that the animation I'm thinking of was mentioned in this Wikipedia entry at some point (or else I don't recognize the title).

Does anyone happen to know of an older (maybe 50s or earlier?) piece of Soviet animation (I believe a short, but not positive about the length, and I believe it was in black and white) about a boy in school who commits some wrongdoing or crime? I remember he either does not admit to this wrongdoing, or blames/frames it on someone else. I also recall stained hands in the animation...Like the boy was caught for having charcoal stained hands or something like this. Sound familiar to anyone? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 208.103.36.95 (talk) 22:14, 1 May 2009 (UTC)

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NPOV[edit]

Words like "unfortunately" and "masterpiece" do not maintain an impartial tone and should not appear in an article like this. The information presented seems fine, but the language needs a little cleanup. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Lobotomy42 (talkcontribs) 19:29, 29 July 2012 (UTC)

several points of criticism , correction, suggestion and elaboration[edit]

Small issue, but the name spelling of several names isn't consequent. Khodateyev next to Khodataev, Tsekhanovskiy next to Tsekhanovsky. My suggestion for names is to always follow the animator.ru spelling: It's the best database on russian animations.

The role of the women in russian animation bigger then the article suggests by not naming them. Although the Brumberg sisters are named. Olga Khodataeva, Alexandra Snezko-Blotskaya, Galina Barinova, Marianne Novgrudskaya, Rasa Strautmane,Ideya Garanina, Nina Shorina, Natalia Orlova, Rosalya Zelma , Maria Mouat, Galina Beda, Oksana Cherkassova, Elena Petkevich, Elena Chernova, Natasha Malgina, Sophia kratsova, Julia Aronova, Nina Bisharina, Zoya Kireyeva, Ekaterina Sokolova But there were also numerous art-directors, Like Grazhina Brashishkite, and an abundance of animators many of whom were/are pretty defining for the industry, and maybe even dominating today.

The article states that Soyuzmultfilm after it was founded for 20 years limitied itself to folk tales and communist myths. Soyuzmultfilm was set up to make animations for children. From the beginnen there were always animations that involved education about toothbrushing ( a sweet tooth 1942) trafic rules Zai & chick (1952) cleanlines moidodir (1927,1939,1954) and such general issues. Many fairytale stories also had firm moralistic statements A fire burns in the rawhide tent (1956), and it has been like that all through the soviet period ( Naida 1984)and numerous films about pioneers that learn a lesson A third element was social/political education/awarenes (Masha's concert 1948), (uncle stiopa the militia man 1964), aurore (1973) If i were my father (1987/88)

Social realism wasn't much of an issue in animation untill after the war. You could say that the fact that Ducks in Russian animation always are inclined to and/or have the ability to swim in contrast to certain American Ducks, is an infuence of social realism, but in the second half of the thirties, and actually a long time after that too,(Petr Nossov animations for instance)comical animal stories, with animals that walked on two feet, with clothes on, lived in houses and could speak & reason were very common. The infuence of Disney was in the late thirties a lot more then just copying the studio system. After worldwar 2 until about 1956/7 lot's of animations depicted minorty people very naturalistic ( song of joy 1946) taiga tale(1950) Brave Puk (1953) and in general had the goal to show the ethnic diversity of the USSR and/or Russia. Untill this very day (mountain of gems serie) that is one of the political stimulated targets of russian animation. In the late 40's & early 50's there came out many nature education animation (an orange throat 1954), animations playing in a idolized russian history ( The dead princess and the 7 bogatir(1950)Sister ayanushka and her brother ivanushka (1953)and/or filmed classic literature ( Kashtanka 1951) The night before Christmas (1951) The disappeared diploma(1945) most animals in animation lost their "disney" clothes and lived in their natural habitat. From '57 onward there is a gradual proces going on of step by step gaining more artistic freedom. Although the story of a crime is certainly a milestone, there were many smaller steps made to reach that milestone: leaving the social realisic depiction of people (once upon a time,well known pictures, both 1957), contemporary times (the key, 1961) , mild social critism (a sober sparrow 1960) But if you want to pinpoint Social realism to a timeline you can say it was invented in 1943 by the brumberg sister with "THE TALE ABOUT TSAR SALTAN" and it was ended in 1961 by the same brumberg sisters with "Great Troubles", a deliberate style breach in the (core)field of cel-animation, into something new. The story of a crime 1962 then combined new style, playing in contemporary times and social criticism into 1 animation

Defining directors for soyuzmultfilm were in the early years the brumberg sisters, Olga khodataeva, Ivan Ivanov vano, Pantaleimon Sazonov, Alber Ivanov, Vladimir Suteyev, Dmitry Babichenko & Leonid Amalrik. Artistically the leningrad animators Mikhael Tsekhanovsky & Mstislav pashchenko, that joined soyuzmultfilm in the wartime when Lenfilm, was dismantelled/bombed out of business, gave Soyuzmulfilm an enormous boost resulting in for instance: the song of joy (1946), with it's fantastic use of light and shadow, and The flower with 7 colours with it's mixture of contemporary elements and fairytale elements. In 1949/50 the Armenian Lev atamanov also joined soyuzmultfilm, with his powerfull dynamics (The yellow stork 1950) In this setting a couple of soyuzmult (before the war) "juniors" could devellop further. Alexandra Snezko-Blotskaya, Ivan Aksenchuk, Boris Dezhkin, Vladimir Degtyarev, Roman Davidov. others could devellop their talens by stepping over, in the later 50's, to the newly formed puppet & stopmotion division of soyuzmultfilm: Roman Kachanov, Fedor Khitruk

Vladimir Suteyev develloped further as scenario(& illustrated childrens books)writer and is responsible for some 40 scripts in the 50's and 60's . Some composers develloped too by their contribution to animation in the 60's. The most important one: sophia Gubaidulina

Also important for develloping the new 60's style were some art directors: Grazhina Brashishkite, Victor Nikitin, leonid Shvartsman, alexander Vinokurov

End 60 begin 70 it was time for a new generation Eus347 (talk) 14:50, 6 August 2012 (UTC)

Lack of citations[edit]

This is largely uncited, and therefore largely subject to deletion is that malady is not addressed. Epeefleche (talk) 00:15, 25 June 2015 (UTC)

A little over a year ago I went and did a detailed Google search for sources to further refine this article, but have not found the time to process them. I did however put them under some sub-headings. So here they are for anyone interested:

Threads:

Lists:

Review:

Nu Pagodi:

Vinni Puhvk:

Modern CGI/Timur Bekemetov:

Space Dogs:

Anylisis:

News:

Technopeasant (talk)

External links modified[edit]

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