Talk:Language technology

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Computing (Rated Stub-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
 
Note icon
This article has been automatically rated by a bot or other tool as Stub-Class because it uses a stub template. Please ensure the assessment is correct before removing the |auto= parameter.
WikiProject Computer science (Rated Stub-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computer science, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Computer science related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Stub-Class article Stub  This article has been rated as Stub-Class on the project's quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the project's importance scale.
 

The purpose of this article is to bring together a history of reporting, review and relevant information on the development and introduction of Human Language Technology.

It is interesting to note that the development and introduction of Human Language Technology is a new subject to be entered into encyclopedia format.

As with many amazing events and discoveries it is often with hindsight and after a period of disbelief and rejection, that acceptance is finally achieved, as to the actuality of such an event. And it is a perspective or the ability to share a perspective that may initiate acceptance. In an effort to promote a people centered collaboration in building high-quality encyclopedia content this article has been submitted.

Basis of this article for inclusion to this encyclopedia.

Firstly, this article is part of internationally accepted knowledge. The following is evidence of the peer review of this article’s information. 1. Reported by Tim Johnson, noted author on related subjects, published by Ovum Ltd, 1985: “the situation is beginning to change” (computers processing human language) he attributes to “Weidner” 2. Reported by G. Van Slype, noted author on related subjects, 1983, Pergamon Press: “Systran is out of date and should be replaced by a more interactive processing method. This has been well understood by Systran’s current rival Weidner” 3. Reported by Geoffrey Kingscott, Number one reporter in language matters, April 1992, Language International, “is for Languages what Silicon Valley is for computers” 4. Reported by the renowned scientist F. Carlyle Harmon “Wydner's special machine translation concepts that were used in the European Translation System (1979), where Bruce C. Wydner is still called the "Father of Cost Effective Machine Translation." 5. Reported by Richard A. Shaffer, Wall Street Journal, “California Firm to Unveil a Computer That Processes Words for Translators” "The device is a word-processing machine" "Quadrupling Translation Volume." 6. Reported by The Deseret News, Oct. 31, 1978, “the software instantaneously does about 85% of the processes of a human translator.” 7. Practical Experience of Machine Translation, Veronica Lawson, 1982, North Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 8. Machine Translation Today; The State of the Art, Margaret King, 1984, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, Scotland. 9. Machine Translation; Past, Present, Future, W. J. Hutchins, 1986, Ellis Norwood Limited, Chichester, England. 10. Natural Language Markets, Commercial Strategies, July 1991, Referenced by Ian Pigott, Commission of the European Communities, Ovum Report. 11. Reported by Michael Quinlan, President of Transparent Languages, March 8, 2000, “the most advanced implementation of automatic translation”

Secondly, this article is not: Primary (original) research, an Original invention, a Personal essays, Opinions on current affairs, a discussion forum, or Journalism. The intent of this article is not one of being a soap box, just informative. This article is just new to encyclopedia content and may need some formatting and adjustment to the corpus.

Valid objections or modifications are welcome, as this is a fluid article and subject to public collaboration. - unsigned edit by Dbp653 (talk · contribs · deleted contribs · logs · edit filter log · block user · block log)

Secondly, this article is not
However, it is an article created in breach of the WP:COI guidelines. See Wikipedia:Articles for deletion/Language technology for other editors' opinions on whether it falls under WP:SOAP.

Redirect[edit]

Comments from Human language technology:

Worst article ever?[edit]

This article appears to see HLT through a very narrow lense. It ignore decades of HLT work prior to Wydner, as well as decades since. It makes amazing claims ("invented HLT"???) and fails to document them. It appears to be little more than self-promotion. An encyclopedia article must consist of more than dozens of quotes from one practitioner in a field. —johndburger 20:51, 21 June 2007 (UTC)

I would simply redirect this to Language technology (which should also be cleaned up). --Silvonen 05:19, 26 June 2007 (UTC)
On closer examination, the HLT article virtually duplicated material at Language technology, so I've blanked and redirected. Gordonofcartoon 08:47, 26 June 2007 (UTC)
Probably should have gone the other way—HLT is the more widely accepted term, but we can change it back later, if the page survives. —johndburger 02:45, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Response from dbp653[edit]

I live in Missouri, Mr. Wydner lives in Utah. I met him a few years ago in Utah after I had signed up for a Spanish class. Mr. Wydner is has been and is currently teaching Spanish in Utah using the principles of Machine Translation as his course material. Mr. Wydner has been teaching others and my-self these lessons free of charge and at his own expense for at least the past seven years. My relationship with Mr. Wydner came from participation in his classes. I met other students that had gone through his program years earlier. When I met Mr. Wydner in Utah he shared with me his perspective. I got busy in digging up the relevant information about his life and his work. I do talk to Mr. Wydner by phone often and I ask him questions relevant to these articles, he really does like to talk to people and share his perspecitve. He has allowed me, with his permission, to share what I have collected from him and about him with others, I feel my work is one of a reporter of sorts. Mr. Wydner and I have open dialogues. I have found available in international reporting and collaboration an amazing amount of facts to report and a perspective that there is to tell. Am I the most qualified to share this information? Perhaps not (I am the Chief Engineer at a Public Radio Station in Missouri, not an encyclopedia editor,) but you will find that there are others including experts in the field and accomplished individuals who also collaborate much if not most of what is in these articles. Do I have an agenda? Sure I want to share important information that has had little attention paid to it. I challenge you to do the deep dive into this subject like I have, get to work in sharing what is true and factual about this subject. Instead being against my motives here, bring into this article the relevant information about these articles.

The purpose of this article is to bring together a history of reporting, review and relevant information on the development and introduction of Human Language Technology.

It is interesting to note that the development and introduction of Human Language Technology is a new subject to be entered into encyclopedia format.

As with many amazing events and discoveries it is often with hindsight and after a period of disbelief and rejection, that acceptance is finally achieved, as to the actuality of such an event. And it is a perspective or the ability to share a perspective that may initiate acceptance. In an effort to promote a people centered collaboration in building high-quality encyclopedia content this article has been submitted.

Basis of this article for inclusion to this encyclopedia.

Firstly, this article is part of internationally accepted knowledge. Bruce Wydner and his work have been reported upon at some length in international literature and in peer review: 1. Reported by Tim Johnson, noted author on related subjects, Tim Johnson: Natural Language Computing: The commercial applications, London 1985: 165, 170, 335-336 Published by Ovum Ltd, 1985, “the situation is beginning to change” (computers processing human language) he attributes to “Weidner.” 2. Reported by G. Van Slype, noted author on related subjects, 1983, Pergamon Press, “Systran is out of date and should be replaced by a more interactive processing method. This has been well understood by Systran’s current rival Weidner.” 3. Reported by Geoffrey Kingscott, Number one reporter in language matters, April 1992, Language International, “is for Languages what Silicon Valley is for computers.” 4. Reported by the renowned scientist F. Carlyle Harmon “Wydner's special machine translation concepts that were used in the European Translation System (1979), where Bruce C. Wydner is still called the "Father of Cost Effective Machine Translation." 5. Reported by Richard A. Shaffer, Wall Street Journal, October 24, 1978, “California Firm to Unveil a Computer That Processes Words for Translators” "The device is a word-processing machine" "Quadrupling Translation Volume." 6. Reported by The Deseret News, Oct. 31, 1978, “the software instantaneously does about 85% of the processes of a human translator.” 7. Practical Experience of Machine Translation, Veronica Lawson, 1982, North Holland Publishing Company, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 8. Machine Translation Today; The State of the Art, Margaret King, 1984, Edinburgh University Press, Edinburgh, Scotland. 9. Machine Translation; Past, Present, Future, W. J. Hutchins, 1986, Ellis Norwood Limited, Chichester, England. 10. Natural Language Markets, Commercial Strategies, July 1991, Referenced by Ian Pigott, Commission of the European Communities, Ovum Report. 11. Reported by Michael Quinlan, President of Transparent Languages, March 8, 2000, “the most advanced implementation of automatic translation” 12. COMPUTER-AIDED TRANSLATION AT WCC, Margaret M. Perscheid, CALICO Journal, Volume 3 Number 1 13. Analyse des Systems zur computergestützten Übersetzung Weidner – Version Französisch-Englisch 2.5 14. Michael G. Hundt: Working with the Weidner machine-aided translation system, in: Veronica Lawson (Hg): Translating and the computer 4 - Practical experience with machine translation, London 1982:45-51 15. Translation Bureau Canada, Project No. 5-5462, 1985, Trial of the Weidner computer-assisted translation system, o.J., o.O. 16. Henrietta Pons: WCC's translation bureau, in: Veronica Lawson 1982, ebd:165-169 17. Ulla Magnusson-Murray: Operational experience of a machine translation service, in Veronica Lawson (Hg): Translating and the computer 5 - Tools for the trade, London 1983, S.171-180; Tim Johnson ebd:283-286 18. Machine Translation: its History, Current Status, and Future Prospects, Jonathan Slocum, Siemens Communications Systems, Inc., Linguistics Research Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 19. Translation memory: Friend or Foe?, Tony Rode, International Journal for Language and Documentation, pp. 12, 13

Secondly, this article is not: Primary (original) research, just pieced together from many sources, nor an Original invention, a Personal essays, an opinion on current affairs, a discussion forum, or Journalism. The intent of this article is not one of being a soap box, just informative. This article is just new to encyclopedia content.

Valid objections or modifications are welcome, as this is a fluid article and subject to public input on the subject, if this were a paper encyclopedia we wouldn't have had this opportunity.

You appear to know very little about this area. Human language technology is a very large field, with thousands of practitioners and researchers—there is considerable overlap with Natural language processing, you might read that article for an overview of the issues involved. It appears that, if anything, this content about Mr. Wydner has to do with Machine translation sprecifically, not "language technology" or NLP in general. Read the MT article, and the several sub-articles it points to, and you will note little, if any mention is made of Mr. Wydner's contributions. There is a good reason for that. Listing a bunch of references from twenty years ago, for a field that has changed radically in the interim, is pointless. If it belongs anywhere, your boosterism should be confined to the article specifically on Mr. Wydener. —johndburger 02:41, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Copyright?[edit]

What does this mean:

the US Federal Copyright to that Invention, and to all uses of HLT, has always been owned, exclusively, by Bruce Wydner and his Associates

Copyright is on published material. Are you talking about a patent? Even so, this claim is quite incredible. —johndburger 02:51, 29 June 2007 (UTC)

Computational linguistics and definition[edit]

This article is linked to fi:Kieliteknologia, which is the exact translation of the term; but fi:Luokka:Kieliteknologia is linked to Category:Computational linguistics. Should this article be merged with Computational linguistics? fi:Tietokonelingvistiikka claims that "language technology" is a superset of computational linguistics. Certainly a better definition is needed. The definitions found for "language technology" in the sources provided are:

  • Kieliteknologia. Se tutkii teknisiä välineitä ja menetelmiä, joilla ihmisen tuottamaa kieltä - puhetta ja kirjoitusta - voidaan jäsentää tietokoneella käsiteltävään muotoon. Kieliteknologian tunnettuja sovellusaloja ovat automaattinen oikeinkirjoituksen ja kieliopin tarkistus sekä automaattinen puheentunnistus. http://www.ling.helsinki.fi/kieliteknologia/
  • departments where LT research is pursued. These are: text technology and linguistic data resources, grammar technology and linguistic theory and dialogue technology and spoken interaction. The relationship among the three is such that grammar, broadly construed to include semantics and theoretical linguistic analysis, feeds both text technology and dialogue technology, which in turn inform and guide the work on grammar technology and linguistic theory. http://clt.gu.se/
  • Get the right information to the right people at the right time in the right language and the right media at the right level of detail https://www.lti.cs.cmu.edu/

--Nemo 08:52, 16 February 2015 (UTC)