Talk:List of Greek mythological figures

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Geryon[edit]

Geryon listed twice. 67.169.151.72 (talk) 06:04, 21 October 2015 (UTC)

Now removed. Paul August 17:01, 21 October 2015 (UTC)

What about Hercules? And his immortal children? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 121.98.71.172 (talk) 04:30, 29 January 2016 (UTC)

Aegea? A Lesser known Goddess?[edit]

I've came across pieces of information suggesting that Circe, and Pasiphae had an sister named Aegea. She was another daughter of the Sun. Supposedly she was placed in an Cave by Gaia to hide her shining beauty. Can a expert confirm this? I never seen Aegea listed anywhere on Wikipedia. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.11.51.217 (talk) 22:27, 14 February 2016 (UTC)

Which sources mention this? What do they say? MPS1992 (talk) 23:31, 14 February 2016 (UTC)

Sadly there is no direct source, but something I've found talked about from an artist website (which is of no importance for this conversation since he didn't provide any source for his inspiration). The only time I came across this name directly was from an etymology site with the small story included mentioned above which said artist never mentioned that Aegea was related to other goddesses. It made me wonder where exactly is this information coming from. Sadly It was user submitted data, and so it made it impossible to track down. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.11.51.217 (talk) 00:56, 16 February 2016 (UTC)

You might be able to find out more information by asking at Wikipedia:Reference desk/Humanities. Far more people watch there than here. MPS1992 (talk) 20:13, 16 February 2016 (UTC)

I've seen to have come across an alternate name:

---Aega was a lot of people. I will mention the more important ones. In one version she and her sisters suckled the infant Zeus and she was put in the sky later as the constellation Capella. In another version, she was chosen to suckle Zeus but couldn't cut it, so Amalthea came in to take her place. In another version she was a daughter of Helios who was so bright that when the Titans were attacking Olympus they had to ask Gaia to hide her - then she was stuck in a cave, where she ended up suckling Zeus. Zeus got the aegis from the goat version of Aega. Aega is mostly translated as "goat," but can also be said to be "gale of wind." ---

That might explain why it was so hard to track down this goddess. One of many stories where usually an god or goddess has their story changed depending on the ancient author. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 72.11.51.217 (talk) 01:43, 18 February 2016 (UTC)

Cronus as "Titan of harvests and of destructive time."?[edit]

This edit asserts that Cronus was the "Titan of harvests and of destructive time", and cites Dronke, Peter. (edit.) Marenbon, John. Poetry and Philosophy in the Middle Ages, Leiden, The Netherlands. BRILL, 2001; pg. 316. But I can find nothing on that page to support such an assertion. Can anyone who thinks otherwise please quote the relevant passage? Paul August 23:20, 25 February 2016 (UTC)

FYI, google-books searches of the entire cited work for "harvests" "destruction" "destructive" and "time" yield nothing of relevance to Cronus. Haploidavey (talk) 00:06, 26 February 2016 (UTC)
Sorry, I should have checked the article history and the source itself. As you say, it doesn't support the text. MPS1992 (talk) 17:41, 26 February 2016 (UTC)

Apollo[edit]

In Article text: "Apollo (Ἀπόλλων, Apóllōn) God of music, arts, knowledge, healing, plague, prophecy, poetry, manly beauty, and archery. [...] Although Apollo is the god of the sun in Roman mythology, Helios is the god of the sun in Greek mythology. [...] His Roman counterpart is also named Apollo."

Something has to be wrong here, since these lines contradict eachother. It says in Greek mythology Apollo is the God of music, etc. & In Roman Mythology Apollo is the god of the sun & The Roman counterpart is also named Apollo. Either Apollo is not the god of the sun in Roman mythology or the Roman counterpart is not also named Apollo (OR I don't understand it.)

Please have a look at it. Thanks.

ChrisNL (talk) 23:37, 5 October 2016 (UTC)

I see some possible misconceptions you (as well as some of the writers of this article) might have. One is that mythology is static, unchanging over time - but it isn't, it evolves. In Greek mythology Helios, a Titan, and thus a member of the older generation of gods preceding the Olympians, was the personification of the sun. So he was not just a sun god (there could be more than one), or even the god of the sun, he was the sun. But "from the fifth century [BC] onwards, the Olympian Apollo began to be understood as a sun god." (Walter Burkert, Greek Religion p. 145) Thus making Apollo a sun god, along with Helios. This evolution continued to the point where Apollo began to be identified, even equated, with Helios, so Apollo at this point might have been considered to be the sun god, though probably not usually thought of as actually being the sun, as Helios was. In Roman mythology their more or less counterparts are Sol, and Apollo. Like Helios, Sol was the personification of the sun, and like the Greek Apollo, the Roman Apollo was also a sun god. Whether the Roman Apollo should be considered the sun god, more so than the Greek Apollo should be, I can't really say, but it would make sense, since it comes later in the evolutionary development. But another possible misconception you might have is thinking that if X is the Greek god of Y, then the Roman counterpart of X must be the Roman god of Y - but that is just too simplistic (and in fact the whole "god of X" thing is problematic). Paul August 01:06, 6 October 2016 (UTC)