Talk:Luke Walker

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This is absolutely ridiculous[edit]

"Walker did almost everything a pitcher is asked to do. He started and filled various relief roles coming out from the bullpen as a closer, middle reliever, and set-up man as well." Is the guy who wrote this familiar with the fact that there was no such specimin as a "closer" or a "set-up man" in baseball during the time that Walker pitched? Unlike today, a starting pitcher went into the game with the intention of FINISHING THE GAME. A complete game was not a rarity back then. In fact, starting pitchers often went the distance even if their team was trailing. Generally speaking, with the exception of a Tug McGraw, Sparky Lyle, Ron Taylor, Clay Carroll, Pedro Borbon, or such, a relief pitcher generally was in the bullpen because the manager didn't feel that he was GOOD ENOUGH to start. There wasn't the specialization that there is today. It is an anachronism to describe Walker as a "closer" or "set-up man". I quote the first paragraph of the Wikipedia page entitled "anachronism": "An anachronism (from the Greek "ana" "ανά", "against, anti-", and "chronos" "χρόνος", "time") is anything that is temporally incongruous in the time period it has been placed in—that is, it appears in a temporal context in which it seems sufficiently out of place as to be peculiar, incomprehensible or impossible. The item is often an object, but may be a verbal expression, a technology, a philosophical idea, a musical style, a material, a custom, or anything else closely enough bound to a particular period as to seem odd outside it." In other words, in an attempt at an analogy, it's kind of like saying that George Washington had television press conferences. An absurd anachronism!!!!! I am considering removing this "closer" and "set-up man" stuff when used in terms of Luke Walker and similar pitchers of his era or earlier eras. It's ABSURD! Runt (talk) 10:27, 25 November 2008 (UTC)