Talk:Newspaper theft

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"In popular culture" section[edit]

I see one of the first additions to this article since my initial contributions is an "In popular culture" section. These tend to go south *really* quickly, and I'm hoping it doesn't degenerate into a sprawling, disconnected list like so many of these "Popular culture" sections tend to. Iamcuriousblue (talk) 21:01, 13 July 2010 (UTC)

Examples[edit]

I think this has happened from time to time with papers such as The Dartmouth Review. I think the Maryland law was prompted by a piece in a UM-College Park regarding Rachel Corrie, which activists tried to take as many of the free copies as they could, and there was a similar incident at Berkeley but I don't recall the detais, and possibly I vaguely remember one regarding the Daily Pennsylvanian at the University of Pennsylvania regarding the water buffalo incident.--Wehwalt (talk) 13:25, 14 July 2010 (UTC)

I do want to flesh out the page by giving some high profile examples, such as what happened with Dartmouth Review in the 1990s. (The Dartmouth Review article could also use some mention of this.) Some others would be the actions of San Francisco police Chief Richard Hongisto against San Francisco Bay Times, the actions by the mayor of Berkeley against Daily Californian, and the actions against the The Diamondback at University of Maryland, since all three of these resulted in legislation being passed. There are several other high-profile incidents mentioned in the Calvert article I linked to. However, newspaper theft has become such a common tactic since the 1990s, especially on college campuses, that we should not go overboard and try to make an exhaustive list. Iamcuriousblue (talk) 16:50, 14 July 2010 (UTC)