Talk:Plug door

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Boeing exclusive use of plug doors?[edit]

FTA: "Commercial aircraft manufactured by Boeing use plug doors exclusively, including the 737, 747, 757, 767 and the 777."

United Airlines Flight 811 shows that Boeing did at some point use outward opening cargo doors on the 747. (still does?) Therefore I marked the quote as needing a citation. 81.221.99.191 19:34, 30 December 2006 (UTC)

Whereas I've deleted that sentence since my take is that the outward-opening cargo bay door on the 747 shows that Boeing does not use plug doors exclusively. --Dricherby 19:07, 13 February 2007 (UTC)

The Boeing 747 still uses outward opening cargo doors. There have been notable failures due to malfunctions in the latching mechanism, but the design has been improved. The doors use multiple latches to hold them in place, operated simultaneously by an electric motor and mechanical linkages. There is also a manual override lever. — QuicksilverT @ 20:47, 28 February 2012 (UTC)

In the event of decompression...[edit]

"However, in the event of a decompression, with there no longer being a pressure differential, the doors may be opened, and as such most airlines operating procedures require cabin crew to keep passengers away from the doors until the aircraft has safely landed."

Why would the doors be opened? Would they "pop open" by themselves or be opened by cabin crew? Acdx 01:12, 6 June 2007 (UTC)

No they wouldn't open by themselves. However an unruly/panicked passenger could open them easily (including the emergency doors). Aesma (talk) 13:56, 30 October 2010 (UTC)

In Construction section[edit]

Use in construction as a reference door is feasible but I've never heard of it in 20yrs as an architect and I can find no reference in web search. Suggest it be reintroduced after referencing. Plug doors are used architecturally but not like this. Ex nihil (talk) 11:58, 3 October 2009 (UTC)

Are these really plug doors?[edit]

Are the doors described under Buses, Trains and Refrigeration cars really plug doors? I suspect not. The buses and trains ones seem to be just variations on sliders, the refrigeration doors are just heavy and well sealed doors. To be a plug door it needs to wedge into an opening in order to seal it against some pressure differential, otherwise almost everything that shuts is a plug door. I suggest that these three sections be deleted. Ex nihil (talk) 07:48, 19 December 2011 (UTC)

Perhaps they aren't plug doors when closely examined. However, there are applications for oval-shaped plugs that are used on large vessels to hold liquids, on autoclaves and pressure cookers, that are pulled against the inside wall of the vessel with some sort of clamp or jackscrew. Some are used merely for filling and emptying the vessel, while others are large enough to use as a hatch for cleaning and maintenance. They don't rely entirely on pressure differential and wedging to hold them in place, but once the vessel is filled or pressurized, they cannot be opened. It might be worth covering in this article, unless it's been covered elsewhere in Wikipedia. — QuicksilverT @ 21:04, 28 February 2012 (UTC)