Talk:Shakespeare garden

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WikiProject Horticulture and Gardening (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
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WikiProject Shakespeare (Rated C-class, Low-importance)
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Comment[edit]

I have a problem with this section: "Some Shakespeare gardens also grow species that Shakespeare cultivated at his home in Stratford-upon-Avon but not mentioned in his plays or poetry. Shakepeare was reputed to be an avid gardener." There have been a number of popular claims for Shakepeare's life - that he was a butcher, a money-lender, a poacher, a wool merchant, a sailor, a university student etc. These are all imaginative speculations based on an assumption that if Shakey mentioned something in his plays then he must have had intimate and physical experience of these things. I have removed the line that Shakey was commonly assumed to be a gardener, keen or otherwise, as being misleading for readers. It is not needed for the point of the article, which is about about gardens on the theme of Shakepeare. I also think that the line that Shakepeare cultivated certain plants at his home in Stratford needs adjusting as this is also a huge unfounded assumption. I have visited the house in Stratford, and they have filled the building and garden with examples of furniture, objects and plants that are typical of the period, but certainties are hard to come by - and any claim that Shakespeare himself had a hand in the garden must be treated with suspicion. I propose changing the line to read: Some Shakespeare gardens also grow species typical of the Elizabethan period but not mentioned in Shakespeare's plays or poetry. SilkTork 08:45, 8 February 2006 (UTC)

It would great if someone could provide a list of these plants that are mentioned in Shakespeare's plays.

The best way to cheat is to allow yourself everything found in Gerard's Herball, 1597. --Wetman 12:31, 8 February
  • Shakespeare's mulberry tree, as piously mentioned in the article, is a story in itself, how it was chopped down by the Rev Francis Gastrell (son of the Bishop of Chester), of New Place, Stratford-upon-Avon, to the horror of Dr Johnson and David Garrick—Boswell tells the story—and how the mulberry wood from it, expanding like the True Cross, multiplied into a cottage industry, servicing tourists to Stratford-upon-Avon into the 19th century. I had a fine box that had been made from it myself at one time. --Wetman 14:36, 8 February 2006 (UTC)2006 (UTC)

I have restored the statement and added two references to Illinois State University and the Central Park Conservancy. If someone has citations for claims to the contrary then I suggest adding them and creating a subsection under a title something like, "Was Shakespeare a gardener?" Durova 16:12, 8 February 2006 (UTC)


Would someone like to add the Elizabethan Garden at Folger Shakespeare Library to this list? I would do so myself but I have a "conflict of interest" (COI) because I do a lot of freelance writing and editing for the Folger. The garden consists of plants mentioned in Shakespeare's plays or commonly used in his time.

There is some info about the garden at the "Elizabethan Garden" page on the Folger site. There's also a link on that page to an NPR story about the garden. The Folger site also has an associated "question and answer" page but it is more general.

Thanks!

--EFerington (talk) 21:42, 18 November 2007 (UTC)

 Done --Xover (talk) 09:14, 27 July 2008 (UTC)