Talk:Tai tou

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Not as old-fashioned as this article would have us believe[edit]

There are a couple of errors in the current article:

  1. Nuo tai is still in use outside Taiwan, e.g., in Hong Kong. It might be a bit old fashioned, but it is still in use.
  2. Ping tai is very much still in current use in letters and is not old fashioned at all. There are two places in letters that really are ping tai if you think about it:
    1. The line break within the closing blessing in informal letters
    2. The line break within the address to recipient in formal letters

Gniw (Wing) (talk) 05:12, 29 December 2010 (UTC)

Queries[edit]

  • What does "above a normal line" mean? If "crlf" means "carriage return, line feed", does it mean this?:-
    1.  :: Dan tai: insert "crlf space"
    2.  :: Shuang tai: insert "crlf space space"
    3.  :: San tai: insert "crlf space space space"
    • "San tai (Chinese: 三抬, literally "triple shift") as above, but three characters above a normal line; since Chinese writers customarily leave a margin of two characters for tai tou from the paper border, a san tai would require the first character to appear outside of the page borders" :: this seems to mean, if taken literally, that the first character would be in the air off the left edge of the paper!!! If "above" is literal, the raised characters would overlap the previous line of text above. Or what is intended?
    • The examples shown in zh:抬頭 seem to show that "san tai" respect of 天 ("heaven") is written with "crlf space space" before the character.
    • Anthony Appleyard (talk) 21:09, 13 June 2017 (UTC)