Talk:Television licensing in the United Kingdom

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TV Licensing Blog etc[edit]

I've partially reinstated the mention of TV Licensing Blog. Out of deference to Nick Cooper I have not included a link to the site (although I don't see any harm in it myself) and I have put in the reference to the original request to get the context. I think the quote is noteworthy in that it indicates the very detailed and specific sort of monitoring that the BBC carries out on these sort of sites ie. it is not just the case of guaging the general feeling out on the web regarding the TV Licence. The quote also draws attention to the monitoring of Twitter. I've also mentioned the monitoring of Facebook with another reference. I hope this will keep everyone happy. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 193.105.48.20 (talk) 10:01, 11 August 2014 (UTC)

The TV Licensing Blog published an interesting article the other day, where they highlighted the fact that one of their readers had successfully sued TV Licensing for the costs he incurred wasting time dealing with their letters. Article is here: http://tv-licensing.blogspot.co.uk/2014/10/tv-licensing-where-theres-muck-theres.html
The blog has stored all of the original documentation in a folder, which they link to from the article so it seems authentic and newsworthy to me. It is clear that the claimant's success is a direct result of information he read on the TV Licensing Blog, who have invested considerable time in researching the article. It is the TV Licensing Blog's story, but the case had also been mentioned in The Times (piece called "Licence enforcers pay £150 to man with no TV", page 41, Sat 8th November) and Nick Abbot's LBC radio show (broadcast on Sat, 8th November 2014). Personally I think it's a very important development, so should it be mentioned somewhere in the Wiki article? — Preceding unsigned comment added by 92.30.135.63 (talk) 19:48, 9 November 2014 (UTC)
People's personal hobby horse blogs are not acceptable sources. End of. Nick Cooper (talk) 14:00, 10 November 2014 (UTC)
Although you could use the Times Newspaper as a reference. Something along the lines of 'According to the the Times Newspaper .......' and then reference the date or publication, page etc.193.105.48.20 (talk) 10:42, 19 November 2014 (UTC)
In a recent FOI response, the BBC has accepted the validity of the above story (ie of TVL being sued)and the documents displayed in the Blog. https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/tv_licensing_successfully_sued#comment-56877 The BBC also offers the additional information that: 'please be advised that in this case a judgement was entered in default simply because legal documents were redirected to the wrong office. No legal issues were considered by the court and this judgement does not set a precedent. Of the small number of previous cases which have been brought on similar grounds, none have been successful.' 193.105.48.20 (talk) 11:03, 30 January 2015 (UTC)

Whether or not the BBC respect "WOIRA" requests[edit]

I had some discussion with Pictsidhe about this on my talk page. It may be of interest to other editors. GoddersUK (talk) 15:57, 18 August 2015 (UTC)

I read the discussion. Note that the BBC's policy as regards WOIRA is summarised in Chapter 4 Section 7 of the Visiting Procedures. I quote: 'Withdrawn implied rights of access must be respected by TV Licensing since EOs would be committing trespass if they visited the address after the right of access had been withdrawn.' It also says that the EO should update the records and that Customer Relations should correspond to the person making the request to confirm the WOIRA. There are references on the web to WOIRA requests being ignored but they seem to be in blogs and similar websites so they're not really usable in the article. 195.194.15.4 (talk) 13:19, 20 August 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

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I have just added archive links to 5 external links on Television licensing in the United Kingdom. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

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Television and the royals[edit]

I wonder if government officials are exempt from getting a licence. 173.86.6.17 (talk) —Preceding undated comment added 21:41, 27 March 2016 (UTC)

There is certainly no exemption for "government officials," but Her Majesty would clearly be age-exempt, anyway. Nick Cooper (talk) 10:26, 19 July 2017 (UTC)


Tax[edit]

Article stated that the licence fee is a tax in two separate locations, both sourced and cited. I reviewed the source and it actually says the opposite - that it is not a tax, so I have removed the unsourced assertions. 87.82.49.130 (talk) 09:52, 19 July 2017 (UTC)

Have reinstated both deleted sections with sources First source is a House of Lords Select Committee report that states that: "in January 2006 the Office of National Statistics re-classified the licence fee as a tax". The Committee response: "the decision means that from now on the licence fee will be recognised as a form of hypothecated taxation." Further down the report says: "The reclassification of the licence fee as a tax, and of the BBC as a central government body, could therefore have significant implications for the BBC’s independence." Para 28 says: "The licence fee is now classified as a tax and we note that for the first time the Government have started to use it as such. They are using it to cover costs that should be covered by general taxation, in particular the costs of providing targeted help with digital switchover." Readf paras 22-33 for the details.
The second source is a note from the House of Commons Library regarding Hypothecated Taxation. The relevent quotes here are: "'Hypothecation' means earmarking tax revenues for specific, identified purposes.'Pure hypothecation' would see spending on a particular programme linked directly to the revenue raised by a particular tax or set of taxes: the licence fund used to finance the BBC is perhaps the best example of this". Also: "Even in Britain, the BBC licence fee has managed to sustain a quality public service for nearly 70 years. Although both of these forms of hypothecated taxes have had their problems, they are not more troublesome than other taxes...."195.194.15.5 (talk) 10:59, 24 July 2017 (UTC)
The Select Committe report discusses the Office if National Statistics reclassifying the Licence Fee as a tax, but the report strongly disagrees with that reclassification. The ONS makign the reclassification for its own calculation purposes does not "officially" make it so. Nick Cooper (talk) 11:19, 24 July 2017 (UTC)
Actually the Committee does not strongly agree with the re-classification - it just points out a possible drawback. The Committee says: "the decision means that from now on the licence fee will be recognised as a form of hypothecated taxation." I have added a small section about the re-classification on the grounds that it is relevant to the article, truthful and backed by reliable sources. The aim of Wikipedia should be to provide information.195.194.15.5 (talk) 12:14, 25 July 2017 (UTC)