Talk:Triscuit

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Are Triscuits woven or stamped?[edit]

How are triscuits made? How do they get that "woven" look? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 71.212.124.229 (talk) 05:09, 12 May 2007 (UTC).

SPAM ADS[edit]

This article had developed into a spam ad with unsupported claims to nutrition and advertising brand extensions in a bullet list. I removed the claim and moved the variations list to a footnote. --Kevin Murray 21:56, 19 July 2007 (UTC)

I can do without the flavor list, but I hardly think that mentioning that Triscuits are high in fiber, using a source from WebMD is spam. Fiber is a objective property of a Triscuit - your perception of fiber as spam is your own subjectivity.
Source Title: 6 Foods and Tips for More Fiber
Source Recommendation: Reduced-Fat Triscuit crackers = 3 grams
Therefore the source implies that Triscuits are a recommended source of dietary fiber, does it not? the_undertow talk 22:08, 19 July 2007 (UTC)
  • I would somewhat agree that there is an implication of providing fiber, but the quantities of crackers are ambiguous and there is no specific statement to support the conclusion that this product is superior to other crackers in that respect. A vague example on WebMD is not exactly a clinical assurance of superior health values. Short of inferences bordering on primary research, I'd just say it's a damn fine cracker. Cheers! --Kevin Murray 07:15, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
  • If they end up using that as a slogan, you may want to sue. There is no consensus to put back my 'valuable' information on fiber, so I'm going to leave it alone. However, I feel bad for the colons across the world that will never know about this damn fine cracker. the_undertow talk 20:33, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
  • Funny! I stumbled across this when doing some research on foods which will help me to lower my blood sugar. Sadly Triscuits which are my favorite cracker are no better than others for carb. intake. Sadly the new rye triscuit is no better than regular trisket, though rye is generally a bit lower in carbs than wheat. --Kevin Murray 02:01, 21 July 2007 (UTC)

WikiProject Food and drink Tagging[edit]

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Copyright violation[edit]

The majority of this article appears to have been copied directly from an article on HowStuffWorks by Nancy S. Hughes. Since I don't see any open licensing on HowStuffWorks, I believe it to be copyrighted material. Because it is difficult to correct without a full rewrite from other sources, I have marked this page as a copyright violation until it can be corrected. If there is a better way to address this, I would appreciate learning how. Strandist (talk) 00:46, 13 July 2009 (UTC)

  • I did a little quick rewrite to try to address this. The current article is not a word-for-word lift from the Hughes article, so I don't see the copyright issue. Not that the article couldn't use more work and more sources... Geoff T C 14:48, 14 July 2009 (UTC)

Name[edit]

I would think the name is a portmanteau of Triticum (Latin for wheat, and generic name) and biscuit. TRIticum + biSCUIT = TRISCUIT I could be wrong, of course, but as it is a biscuit made of wheat, a combination of the words for wheat and biscuit work really well. Now, if only I could find a source for that... mpbx (talk) 08:53, 10 March 2010 (UTC)

Triscuits have three ingredients, so "tri" could mean three. It could also have three types of grain. HotdogPi (talk) 18:41, 26 February 2012 (UTC)
I think it might mean "thrice-baked". Biscuit means twice baked. In French, "cuit" means baked. 86.11.163.10 (talk) 21:23, 16 June 2013 (UTC)
I was told that it was because Triscuits are Triticale Wheat baked into Biscuits. Triticale is a hybrid of wheat and rye that was invented right around the same time as Triscuits. Prove me wrong! :D moeburn (talk) 20:30, 23 August 2013 (UTC)

(The following discussion was floating outside of a section so I merged it into this section) CrocodilesAreForWimps (talk) 18:14, 9 February 2018 (UTC)

But what does 'triscuit' mean? Three cuts? I do not understand!

It's a pun on "biscuit"; the idea is that a triscuit is fifty percent better or something. Tb 03:59, 6 March 2007 (UTC)
According to Lore's Book of Ratings, Triscuit provides you with "three of whatever a 'scuit' is." Jerry Kindall 00:51, 1 September 2007 (UTC)
In a final Jeopardy question the clue was "The name of this cracker that’s been around since 1903 suggests that it was baked 3 times" and the response was "What is Triscuit?". A note on that linked page says that "biscuit" is from the French for twice baked, so triscuit implies thrice-baked. There's no evidence they are actually baked three times though, it's just a name the inventor Henry D. Parker gave the cracker for his patent. As above, it probably has to do with triscuits being better that biscuits. It's probably an anachronism, but also if you look at modern triscuit boxes they highlight they only use three simple ingredients (wheat, salt, and oil). CrocodilesAreForWimps (talk) 18:11, 9 February 2018 (UTC)

References[edit]

Currently large parts of this article are not supported by inline references, anyone who has some spare time is welcome to make improvements. Dysklyver 15:20, 13 October 2017 (UTC)