Talk:Tweezers

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Etymology[edit]

My etymology-sense is waving a "cognate with 'two'" flag, if I may mangle a metaphor. Does anyone know if this is accurate? DS 21:19, 30 November 2005 (UTC)

No, it isn't. According to etymonline.com/American Heritage, it is a mangling of étuis, the plural form of French étui, and possibly related to "study". 惑乱 分からん 20:02, 6 August 2006 (UTC)

Stamp tongs[edit]

Missing: stamp tong. Gerard53 (talk) 16:22, 17 January 2008 (UTC)

fixed. --AliceJMarkham (talk) 01:18, 18 January 2008 (UTC)

Text removed from the History section[edit]

I've just removed a bunch of content from the History section of the article. The text was so vague—failing to name the Swiss inventor, for example—that I don't think it could reasonably be left in the article and my cursory googling for other sources didn't come up with anything. I'm sure there are sources out there somewhere that describe at least the numbering of different types of tweezers. Please restore anything that can be verified.

--Arztde (talk) 21:22, 24 November 2015 (UTC) You did delete a lot of important and relevant information Special about the steel production. I will discuss it with a team how to write better and include again

Here is the text I removed:

It is widely recognized in most industries that rely on tweezers that the first precision tweezers were made in 1875 by a self-taught watchmaker, in La Sagne, Switzerland. With just a hammer, anvil and files, he was able to construct tools (tweezers) which put in valuable service in the exacting field of watch timing.

As different varieties of tweezers were invented, this Swiss watchmaker assigned style numbers to those tools. It’s significant to note that the majority of precision tweezers made today carry that very same numbering, regardless of the manufacturer or country of origin. It’s also interesting to note that the founders of several of the more well-known European manufacturers of tweezers today once worked for the company this watchmaker founded.

In the late 19th century most tweezers were made from carbon tool steel because it was readily available and easy to work. Once the grinding and filing was done the tips of the tweezers were flame hardened for strength. These carbon steel tweezers were coated with a light oil to prevent oxidation.

In the 20th century as these precision tweezers found their way into medical applications, there was a need for precision tweezers that were less apt to oxidize. AISI 440 Stainless Steel became a staple material for the manufacture of medical tweezers. The tweezer manufacturers simply added an ‘S’ to the style number to signify that the tweezer was made of Stainless Steel.

In the 1950’s, the birth of the electronic industry spurred the need for a material that had less magnetism. Precision tweezers began popping up made of AISI 303/304 and AISI 316 Stainless Steel. These alloys, while softer than AISI 440 Stainless Steel, were much less magnetic and more suited to electronic assembly. The suffix ‘SA’ was used for these alloys, which stands for Stainless Anti-Magnetic and for many years it was considered a standard not only in the electronic industry, but also in the medical field.

Classification[edit]

BlckKnght (talk) 22:17, 22 February 2010 (UTC) == Industry tweezer photos needed ==the photos in article are for cosmetic home use.

Industrial Tweezers used in watchmaking, gemology, jewelry and machining. --70.240.151.82 (talk) 00:33, 14 October 2011 (UTC)

--Arztde (talk) 13:20, 29 October 2015 (UTC)I am on the way to prepare more than 200 different tweezers for different use in watchmaking, gemology, jewelry and machining. I will put it as reference. Allone from watchmakers i have more than 100 different photos in good quality also with details provide in CC-BY-SA but this will make not sense to put them all to wikipedia in one article or to wikimedia. Its in German the resources and needs to be adapted to English language. The English information there is to much poor for the moment. I give you an example: http://www.tocan.de/shop/de/Hobby-Bastler-Heimwerker/Pinzetten/Mikro-Pinzetten/Pinzette-Gerald-antimagnetisch-TUX-Loet-Pinzette-mikrogezahnte-feine-Spitze.html Its a Gerald Tweezer comes from Microsurgery and was adapted for SMD soldering in the tips. Best it's in Titan with diamond dust tips to use also in jewelery. Diamond dust with stainless steel in 0,05 mm is not possible. Tocan suports CC-BY-SA so i got high resolution Pictures without their Logo to be neutral.

I did addet today an intermediate resource for classification tweezers or forceps. most links added as resource before are dead links.--Arztde (talk) 13:50, 2 November 2015 (UTC)

--Arztde (talk) 20:53, 24 November 2015 (UTC) We did discuss today with the Open Source http://tocan-tweezer.org Team about this part inside Wikipedia: The original tweezers for mechanical gripping have given rise to a number of tools with similar action or purpose but not dependent upon mechanical pressure, including

Than comes the List and this let make every impossible. For example Google did mark this as internal important information. But shows not the common topc of the term tweezer is used.

The original tweezers for mechanical gripping have given rise to a number of tools with similar action or purpose but not dependent upon mechanical pressure, including

This sentense needs a change and not to be a negative interpretation at the top of the list should be the common use: 1. tweezers 2. medical use forceps 3. eyebrow tweezers as the common name woman use it. watchmaker tweezers... this give a good guide to go on at new pages...