Talk:Unix

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UNiplexed Information Computing System?[edit]

An IP user added the unsourced claim that "UNIX is actually an abbreviated form of UNiplexed Information Computing System (UNICS), now spelled as UNIX", which I reverted. A web search shows a large number of unreliable sources that repeat the claim, but no obvious reliable source. If the claim can be sourced, it should be in the article. If it cannot be sourced, should we mention it as being a common misconception? Guy Macon (talk) 09:22, 19 April 2011 (UTC)

The source is the guy who coined the term UNIX, and its not an abbreviated form, ( that is not what he said ). Its name was a play on MULTICS, and was derived from the terms "UNiplexed Information Computing System" again as a play on MULTICS.

"During 1969 an alternative was being worked on, and in 1970 this alternative was given the name of UNIX, a pun on the name Multics since UNIX can support multiple users and multiple processes. The name was coined by Brian Kernighan."

[1]

"We even knew that it had a joke name, Unix, coined by Brian Kernighan, that was a reference to Multics. ("One of whatever Multics was many of" or "Multics without balls.")"

[2]
So, I have two sources, he has none. I win. Pbbbbbt
Those are not reliable sources. Peter Salus credits Neumann with the name, and from the start, the system support multiple users. QVVERTYVS (hm?) 19:08, 3 January 2014 (UTC)
Ok, I double-checked and Salus states that it stood for "UNIplexed Information and Computing Service". Still, I removed all mention of UNICS because History of Unix is a better place to discuss this kind of trivia. QVVERTYVS (hm?) 19:11, 3 January 2014 (UTC)

Android belongs in the unix-lke family?[edit]

As far as I know it is not and should be removed from the last paragraph of the first sections where it is listed alongside minix linux etc... — Preceding unsigned comment added by 85.74.111.134 (talk) 13:39, 16 July 2012 (UTC)

I think it may be cited as an important offspring through the Linux line. Honestly it bears as much resemblance as iOS on an iPhone. Dennis Richie and Ken Thompson wouldn't recognise either, but still some of their work live in these products. 216.221.57.108 (talk) 03:35, 19 January 2014 (UTC)

Android may use a Linux kernel, but the system lacks the basic features of a Unix-like system. Having a Unix-like kernel is just one small part of a Unix-like system. In other ways, Android is not Unix-like, so it should not be described as such. GNU/Linux is Unix-like, but Android is not GNU/Linux -- it just happens to use a Linux kernel. It does not have the GNU coreutils and other base system software that is needed to have a Unix-like system. Huihermit (talk) 04:29, 19 January 2014 (UTC)

First Release Date[edit]

I just changed the first release date from 4/20/1969 to just 1969, as that particular date looked fishy (4/20 is a marijuana reference), and it turns out it was added by an anonymous user on 3/21/2013, with no other edit history or changes made.

However, I'm not convinced that 1969 is the appropriate year to list as the first release, not least because it's before the beginning of the Unix epoch. Would 1971 or 1973 be more appropriate? Squigish (talk) 04:58, 19 March 2014 (UTC)

The epoch has nothing to do with this. Development starting in 1969, but that was certainly not the first release date. The Version 1 manual was completed in 1971, which can be considered the first internal "release", but I don't know how internal that was, i.e. whether anyone but the computer science group at Bell Labs got to touch the system. I suppose the first Unix shipped outside of Bell after the publication of the CACM paper, Nov. 1973. QVVERTYVS (hm?) 10:29, 19 March 2014 (UTC)

The UNIX release date, according to the official UNIX website (http://www.unix.org/what_is_unix/history_timeline.html), should be 1969 rather than 1973. The original Wikipedia page on UNIX showed 1969 as the release date, while the current page was modified to 1973. 1973 is the wrong year since by 1973, fourth edition of UNIX was released (http://www.unix.org/what_is_unix/history_timeline.html). So it should be changed back to 1969 per the official website (http://www.unix.org/what_is_unix/history_timeline.html). — Preceding unsigned comment added by Tonga2010 (talkcontribs) 14:29, 11 April 2014 (UTC)

Security holes claim[edit]

Am I the only one who doubts the second sentence (marked bold)?

Unix provided the TCP/IP networking protocol on relatively inexpensive computers, which contributed to the Internet explosion of worldwide real-time connectivity, and which formed the basis for implementations on many other platforms. This also exposed numerous security holes in the networking implementations.

It formed the basis for implementations and therefore exposed holes in them? Any references telling more about it? --Sergei (talk) 21:15, 29 March 2014 (UTC)

This sentence is so unclear that I just removed it. If someone wants this back, they'll need a good source for it. QVVERTYVS (hm?) 22:45, 29 March 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 4 April 2014[edit]

Flavours of Unix:

Unix is not a single operating system. It has many flavors i.e implementations .Different flavors have their own unique commands and features, and designed to work with different types of hardware.

Here are some lists:

   Solaris by Sun Microsystems
   AIX by IBM
   BSD/OS (BSDi) by Wind River
   Tru64 Unix (formerly Digital Unix) by Compaq Computer Corp.
   FreeBSD by FreeBSD Group
   GNU Herd by GNU Organization
   HAL SPARC64/OS by HAL Computer Systems, Inc.
   HP-UX by Hewlett-Packard Company
   Irix by Silicon Graphics, Inc.
   Linux by several groups LynxOS by Lynx Real-Time Systems, Inc.
   MacOS X Server by Apple Computer, Inc.
   NetBSD by NetBSD Group
   OpenBSD by OpenBSD Group
   OpenLinux by Caldera Systems, Inc.
   Openstep by Apple Computer, Inc.
   Red Hat Linux by Red Hat Software, Inc.
   SCO Unix by The Santa Cruz Operation Inc.
   SuSE by S.u.S.E., Inc.
   UNICOS by Silicon Graphics, Inc.

Itechonic (talk) 11:57, 4 April 2014 (UTC) [1]

Not done: it's not clear what changes you want made. Please mention the specific changes in a "change X to Y" format. — {{U|Technical 13}} (tec) 13:34, 4 April 2014 (UTC)

Semi-protected edit request on 11 April 2014[edit]

The release year for UNIX should be 1969, not 1973 (see the official website: http://www.unix.org/what_is_unix/history_timeline.html). It was shown as 1969 in the original wiki page. Tonga2010 (talk) 14:38, 11 April 2014 (UTC)

X mark.svg Not done The earliest "release date" given in the article you are citing is 1982.
The only reference to 1969 is that is when they "started working on the "little-used PDP-7 in a corner" at Bell Labs and what was to become UNIX"
"Started working on" is clearly not a release date. Arjayay (talk) 14:57, 11 April 2014 (UTC)
Cite error: There are <ref> tags on this page, but the references will not show without a {{reflist}} template (see the help page).