The Boat That Rocked (soundtrack)

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The Boat That Rocked
The Boat That Rocked soundtrack cover.jpg
Soundtrack album by
ReleasedMarch 30, 2009 (2009-03-30)
GenreRock, pop, soul
Length111:54
LabelMercury
ProducerEric Fellner
Pirate Radio
The film was retitled Pirate Radio for release in North America.
The film was retitled Pirate Radio for release in North America.

The Boat That Rocked is a soundtrack album to the 2009 British film of the same title, a comedy about a fictitious British pirate radio station set in 1966. The soundtrack was released March 30, 2009 through Mercury Records as a double album featuring popular rock, pop, and soul artists of the 1960s.[1][2] It also includes David Bowie's 1983 song "Let's Dance" and a 2009 cover version of "Stay with Me" performed by Duffy, with Lorraine Ellison's original 1966 version included as well.[2] In North America, where the film was retitled Pirate Radio, the soundtrack album was released November 10, 2009 through Universal Republic.[2] The Pirate Radio version omits four tracks that were included on The Boat That Rocked album—"Crimson and Clover" by Tommy James and the Shondells, "The Letter" by The Box Tops, "The End of the World" by Skeeter Davis, and "Hang On Sloopy" by The McCoys—and reverses the order of tracks 7 and 8 on the second disc.[1][2]

Track listing[edit]

The Boat That Rocked version[edit]

Pirate Radio version[edit]

Charts[edit]

Chart (2009) Peak
position
Australian ARIA Albums Chart 3 [3]
New Zealand RIANZ Albums Chart 3 [4]

Certifications[edit]

Region Certification Certified units/sales
Australia (ARIA)[5] Platinum 70,000^

^ Shipments figures based on certification alone.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "Review: The Boat That Rocked (soundtrack)". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-11-03.
  2. ^ a b c d Jurek, Thom. "Review: Pirate Radio (soundtrack)". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-11-03.
  3. ^ "Top 50 Albums Chart - Australian Record Industry Association". Ariacharts.com.au. Archived from the original on 2011-05-18. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  4. ^ "The Official New Zealand Music Chart". Rianz.org.nz. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  5. ^ "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2009 Albums" (PDF). Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved 28 December 2021.