The State vs. Radric Davis

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The State vs. Radric Davis
The state vs radric davis cover.jpg
Studio album by Gucci Mane
Released December 8, 2009
Recorded 2008-2009
Genre Hip hop, southern hip hop
Length 69:18 (regular edition)
87:41 (iTunes deluxe edition)
Label 1017 Brick Squad, Asylum, Warner Bros.
Producer Radric "Gucci Mane" Davis (exec.)
Fatboi, Polow da Don, Drumma Boy, Bangladesh, Shawty Redd, Scott Storch, Zaytoven, Jazze Pha, J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League, Mannie Fresh
Gucci Mane chronology
Murder Was the Case
(2009)
The State vs. Radric Davis
(2009)
The Appeal: Georgia's Most Wanted
(2010)
Singles from The State vs. Radric Davis
  1. "Wasted"
    Released: July 7, 2009
  2. "Spotlight"
    Released: October 19, 2009
  3. "Lemonade"
    Released: December 7, 2009
  4. "Bingo"
    Released: January, 2010

The State vs. Radric Davis is the sixth studio album by American rapper Gucci Mane. It was released on December 8, 2009.[1] The State vs. Radric Davis comes after a slew of independent releases, mixtapes, and features over the past few years. Productions from Polow da Don, Drumma Boy, Mannie Fresh, among others. Featured artists includes, Usher, Plies, Lil Wayne, Cam'ron, Soulja Boy, Rick Ross, Bun B, OJ da Juiceman, Wooh da Kid, Waka Flocka Flame, and Nicki Minaj. The iTunes deluxe version contains the EP, Wasted: The Prequel.

The album debuted at number 10 on the US Billboard 200 selling 89,000 copies in its first week.[2] The album was met with generally favorable reviews from music critics. As of August 19, 2012, the album has sold an estimated 424,000 copies.[3] With the success of The State vs. Radric Davis, Gucci Mane announced that his next two albums will be parts of a trilogy. The second, and third album will be called The Appeal: Georgia's Most Wanted due for release September 28, 2010, and The State vs. Radric Davis: The Verdict, respectively.[4] However he later decided to break the trilogy and change the third album's title.

Singles[edit]

"Wasted" featuring Plies was released as the lead single on September 26, 2009. It peaked at number thirty-six in the Billboard Hot 100, and number three on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart, making it his first top five on the chart. "Spotlight" featuring Usher was released as the second single on October 19, 2009, and peaked at number forty-two in the US as well as reaching number fifteen on Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart. "Lemonade" was released as the third single on December 7, 2009, and peaked at number fifty-three in the US, number fifteen on the Hot R&B/Hip-Hop songs chart, as well as number eight on the Rap songs chart. The song's subject matter involves the proceeds from the illegal sale of codeine-infused lemonade, all of which the artist describes as yellow or lemon-colored. "Bingo" featuring Soulja Boy and Waka Flocka Flame was released as the fourth single on January 12, 2010, and peaked at number seventy-five on the US Hot R&B/Hip-Hop chart.

"Worst Enemy" was released as the first promotional single on November 12, 2009.[5] The song revisits Gucci Mane's past, how it led to his fame, and how he's moving on in life despite his struggles. Young Jeezy and T.I. are referenced in the song. A music video for the song was released on December 8, 2009.[6] "Heavy" was released as the second promotional single on November 25, 2009.[7]

Videos[edit]

The videos for the deluxe edition tracks "Bricks" featuring Yung Ralph and Yo Gotti, "Photoshoot", and "She Got a Friend" featuring Juelz Santana and Big Boi were released on October 20 on iTunes.[8][9][10] A music video was also filmed for "All About the Money" featuring Rick Ross.[11] "Bricks", and "Photoshoot" both managed to peak, respectively, at number nineteen, and number eighteen on the US Billboard Bubbling Under R&B/Hip-Hop Singles chart. "I'm a Dog", which featured DG Yola, and "Sex in Crazy Places" featuring singer Bobby V and rappers Nicki Minaj and Trina, debuted on the same chart at number eight, and number twenty-two, respectively, due to digital sales.

Critical reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic 66/100[12]
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 4/5 stars[13]
The A.V. Club C+[14]
The Guardian 2/5 stars[15]
NME 2/10[16]
NOW 5/5 Ns [17]
Pitchfork Media 8.0/10[18]
RapReviews 6.5/10[19]
Rolling Stone 3.5/5 stars[20]
Spin 3.5/5 stars[21]
XXL 4/5 stars[22]

The State vs. Radric Davis received generally favorable reviews from music critics. At Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, the album received an average score of 66, based on 11 reviews.[12]

Joshua Errett of NOW gave the album high praise for its "loveable simplicity" on the typical hip-hop clichés and said that its cast of guest artists and producers combined with Gucci's performance would turn the record into "rap's album of the year."[17] Gregory Heaney of AllMusic praised the producers and guest artists for creating an album that's a culmination of the Dirty South sound and Gucci for straddling the line between excessive and contemplative, saying that, "At the end of the day, The State vs. Radric Davis delivers the full spectrum of Gucci Mane, showing both the cash and yellow diamond-loving side, as well as his more reflective (or at least more self-aware) side."[13] Rob Markman of XXL also credited the album for having the producers supply it with great sounds and for giving Gucci some guests artists he can trade lines with, concluding that "musically, The State vs. Radric Davis has proven the rapper's case beyond a reasonable doubt. So when rap fans ask if he is now a bankable hip-hop star, let the record show that Gucci mane is guilty as charged."[22]

Michaelangelo Matos of The A.V. Club credited Gucci for compensating his rap delivery over "tinny keyboards and booming drum machines" with "sharp wordplay" but found that formula for the album lacking and suggested listening to his free mixtapes.[14] Paul MacInnes of The Guardian found the album disappointing, calling the Dirty South sound "by the numbers", the producers' contributions unengaging and Gucci's mumbling delivery hard to listen to.[15] Rob Boffard of NME criticized Gucci's flow and lyricism for being monotonous and irritating and the producers and guest artists for not offering anything worthy to the album, concluding that "'…Radric Davis‍ '​ is deeply flawed, and ultimately Gucci has committed the worst crime in rap: he’s boring."[16]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Writer(s) Producer(s) Length
1. "Classical"   Radric Davis, Christopher Gholson Drumma Boy 3:33
2. "Interlude #1: Toilet Bowl Shawty" (featuring Mike Epps)     1:14
3. "Heavy"   Davis, Demetrius Stewart Shawty Redd 4:31
4. "Stupid Wild" (featuring Lil Wayne & Cam'ron) Davis, Dwayne Carter, Jr., Cameron Giles, Shondrae Crawford Bangladesh 4:30
5. "All About the Money" (featuring Rick Ross) Davis, William Roberts II, Gholson Drumma Boy 3:41
6. "Lemonade"   Davis, Crawford Bangladesh 4:06
7. "Bingo" (featuring Soulja Boy & Waka Flocka Flame) Davis, DeAndre Way, Juaquin Malphurs, Scott Storch Scott Storch 3:55
8. "Spotlight" (featuring Usher) Davis, Usher Raymond IV, Jamal Jones Polow da Don 3:53
9. "I Think I'm in Love" (featuring Jason Caesar) Davis, Caesar Xavier Dotson Zaytoven 4:18
10. "Bad Bad Bad" (featuring Keyshia Cole) LaDamon Douglas, Davis, Keyshia Cole Fatboi 3:38
11. "Interlude #2: Toilet Bowl Shawty" (featuring Mike Epps)     1:06
12. "Sex In Crazy Places" (featuring Bobby V, Nicki Minaj & Trina) Davis, Bobby Wilson, Onika Maraj, Douglas, Katrina Taylor Fatboi 4:18
13. "The Movie"   Davis, Phalon Alexander Jazze Pha 4:00
14. "Volume" (featuring Wooh da Kid) Davis, Erik Ortiz, Kevin Crowe J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League 4:07
15. "Gingerbread Man" (featuring OJ da Juiceman) Otis Williams, Jr., Davis, Byron Thomas Mannie Fresh 3:37
16. "Wasted" (featuring Plies) Davis, Algernod Washington, Douglas Fatboi 4:09
17. "Kush Is My Cologne" (featuring Bun B, Devin the Dude & E-40) Davis, Bernard Freeman, Devin Copeland, Earl Stevens, Gholson Drumma Boy 5:17
18. "Worst Enemy"   Davis, Gholson Drumma Boy 4:04
19. "Interlude #3: Toilet Bowl Shawty" (featuring Mike Epps)     1:06
20. "Wasted" (Remix) (featuring Lil Wayne, Jadakiss & Birdman) Davis, Douglas, Carter, Jason Phillips, Bryan Williams Fatboi 4:38
Sample credits
  • "Lemonade" - Contains a samples of "Keep It Warm" by Flo & Eddie
  • "Kush Is My Cologne" - Contains a samples of "I Got Em" by Drumma Boy featuring Gucci Mane & J Money

Charts[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The State vs. Radric Davis: Gucci Mane: Music". Amazon.com. Retrieved 2012-03-10. 
  2. ^ Kaufman, Gil (December 16, 2009). "Susan Boyle Remains Billboard Ruler As Chris Brown Settles For #7 - Music, Celebrity, Artist News". MTV. Retrieved August 15, 2011. 
  3. ^ http://hiphopencounter.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/rap.png
  4. ^ Reid, Shaheem (December 16, 2009). "Gucci Mane Speaks From Jail On New Albums, Young Jeezy Remix - Music, Celebrity, Artist News". MTV. Retrieved December 23, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Worst Enemy - Single by Gucci Mane". iTunes (US). Apple. Retrieved October 26, 2011. 
  6. ^ "iTunes - Music Videos - Worst Enemy by Gucci Mane". iTunes (US). Apple. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Heavy - Single by Gucci Mane". iTunes (US). Apple. Retrieved October 26, 2011. 
  8. ^ "iTunes - Music Videos - Bricks (feat. Yo Gotti & Yung Ralph) by Gucci Mane". iTunes (US). Apple. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  9. ^ "iTunes - Music Videos - Photoshoot by Gucci Mane". iTunes (US). Apple. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  10. ^ "iTunes - Music Videos - She Got a Friend (feat. Juelz Santana & Big Boi) by Gucci Mane". iTunes (US). Apple. Retrieved October 25, 2011. 
  11. ^ Video on YouTube
  12. ^ a b "Reviews for The State vs. Radric Davis by Gucci Mane". Metacritic. CBS Interactive. Retrieved November 8, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b Heaney, Gregory. "The State vs. Radric Davis - Gucci Mane". AllMusic. All Media Network. Retrieved August 9, 2011. 
  14. ^ a b Matos, Michaelangelo (December 15, 2009). "Review: Gucci Mane: The State Vs. Radric Davis". The A.V. Club. The Onion. Retrieved August 9, 2011. 
  15. ^ a b MacInnes, Paul (February 5, 2010). "Gucci Mane: The State vs Radric Davis". The Guardian. London: Guardian Media Group. Retrieved June 24, 2015. 
  16. ^ a b Boffard, Rob (February 22, 2010). "Album Review: Gucci Mane - 'The State Vs Radric Davis'". NME. IPC Media. Retrieved June 24, 2015. 
  17. ^ a b Errett, Joshua (December 16, 2009). "Gucci Mane - The State Vs. Radric Davis (So Icey/Asylum/Warner)". NOW. NOW Communications. Retrieved August 9, 2011. 
  18. ^ Breihan, Tom (January 11, 2010). "Gucci Mane: The Burrprint: The Movie 3-D / The State vs. Radric Davis". Pitchfork Media. Retrieved August 9, 2011. 
  19. ^ Cloutier, Louis 'Delicate Beats' (December 22, 2009). "Gucci Mane :: The State vs. Radric Davis :: So Icey Ent./Atlantic Records". RapReviews. Retrieved August 9, 2011. 
  20. ^ Rolling Stone review at the Wayback Machine (archived January 8, 2010)
  21. ^ Fennessey, Sean (January 12, 2010). "Gucci mane, 'The State vs. Radric Davis' (Asylum)". Spin. SpinMedia. Retrieved June 24, 2015. 
  22. ^ a b Markman, Rob (December 1, 2009). "XXL Reviews Gucci Mane's The State vs. Radric Davis". XXL. Townsquare Media. Retrieved August 9, 2011. 
  23. ^ "Gucci Mane – Chart history" Billboard 200 for Gucci Mane. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  24. ^ "Gucci Mane – Chart history" Billboard Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums for Gucci Mane. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  25. ^ "Gucci Mane – Chart history" Billboard Top Rap Albums for Gucci Mane. Retrieved June 24, 2015.
  26. ^ "2010 Year-End Charts: Billboard 200 Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved June 24, 2015. 
  27. ^ "2010 Year-End Charts: R&B/Hip-Hop Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved June 24, 2015. 
  28. ^ "2010 Year-End Charts: Rap Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved June 24, 2015.