Thirlwall Prize

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Since 1884, the Thirlwall Prize was instituted at Cambridge University, England, in the memory of Bishop Connop Thirlwall, and has been awarded during odd-numbered years, for the best essay about British history or literature for a subject with original research. It was instituted on the condition that a foundation a medal is awarded in alternate years for the best dissertation involving original historical research, together with a sum of money to defray the expenses of publication. From 1885, the Prince Consort Prize was awarded in alternate years.

Winners[edit]

Winners of the Thirlwall Prize include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Claudian as an Historical Authority by J. H. E. Crees.
  2. ^ W.G. East, The Union of Moldavia and Wallachia, 1859 - An Episode in Diplomatic History, Cambridge University Press (1929).

Sources[edit]

  • Endowments of the University of Cambridge, published in 1904, by John Willis Clark

External links[edit]