Thomas Martin Lindsay

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T. M. Lindsay.

Rev Dr Thomas Martin Lindsay DD FRSE (1843–1914) was a Scottish historian, professor and principal of the Free Church College, Glasgow. He was a prolific writer of church history and in authorship he is often referred to as Thomas M. Lindsay.

He wrote chiefly on church history, his major works including Luther and the German Reformation (1900), and A History of the Reformation in Europe (1906–1907).

Life[edit]

He was born on 18 October 1843 in Lesmahagow[1] in Lanarkshire, the eldest son of Rev. Alexander Lindsay, and his wife, Susan Irvine Martin. He was educated in Lesmahagow.

Lindsay studied Divinity at the University of Glasgow and then at the University of Edinburgh. In 1869 he entered the ministry of the Free Church of Scotland, and in 1872 was appointed Professor of Church History at the Free Church College, Glasgow. At this time he lived at "Thornliebank" on Ann Street in the Hillhead district.[2] He took up the position of Principal of the College in 1902.[3][4] He then moved to the mopre affluent address of 37 Westbourne Gardens in Kelvinside,[5] an attractive three-storey and basement Victorian terraced house.

Lindsay unsuccessfully supported William Robertson Smith in a trial for heresy between 1877 and 1881 which resulted in Smith's losing his position at the Aberdeen Free Church College.[3][4]

He died in Glasgow on 6 December 1912.[6]

Publications[edit]

  • The Critical Movement in the Free Church of Scotland (1879)
  • The Reformation (1882)
  • Luther and the German Reformation (1900)
  • The Church and the Ministry in the Early Centuries (1902)
  • The New Testament (1906)
  • A History of the Reformation in Europe (two volumes, 1906 and 1907).
  • An Oxford Bookseller in 1520 (1907)
  • Englishmen and the Classical Renaissance (1909)

He was a contributor to Encyclopædia Britannica and to the Cambridge Modern History.[3][4]

Family[edit]

Lindsay married Anna Dunlop (1845–1903), and their children included Alexander Lindsay, 1st Baron Lindsay of Birker, Professor of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow, Master of Balliol College, and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford.[7]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX OF FORMER FELLOWS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH 1783 – 2002 (PDF). The Royal Society of Edinburgh. July 2006. ISBN 0 902 198 84 X. 
  2. ^ Glasgow Post Office Directory 1875
  3. ^ a b c 'Lindsay, Thomas Martin (1843–1914), historian' in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2007)
  4. ^ a b c Thomas Martin Lindsay at biblicaltraining.org, accessed 19 June 2013
  5. ^ Glasgow Post Office Directory 1903
  6. ^ BIOGRAPHICAL INDEX OF FORMER FELLOWS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF EDINBURGH 1783 – 2002 (PDF). The Royal Society of Edinburgh. July 2006. ISBN 0 902 198 84 X. 
  7. ^ Lindsay, Alexander Dunlop, 1st Baron Lindsay of Birker, in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography at oxforddnb.com(subscription site), accessed 20 June 2013

External links[edit]