Timeline of Mountain View, California

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Mountain View, California, USA.

Prior to 20th century[edit]

  • The Ohlone tribe inhabited the area, the Tamyen (Tamien, Thamien) people are associated with the Mountain View area.
  • 1777 - Mission Santa Clara de Asís is founded on January 12[1], and the land that is now Mountain View was used as pasture for sheep and cattle by the Mission Indians.[2]
  • 1842 - Mexico grants 8,800 acre land (part of what is now part of Mountain View and Sunnyvale) to Francisco Estrada and his wife, Inez Castro.[3][4]
  • 1844 - Mexico grants 1,700 acre land grant of Rancho Posolmi, (the Moffett Field area) is granted to local Native American Lupe Ynigo.[4]
  • 1845 - The Rancho Pastoria de las Borregas (Ranch of the Ewe/Lamb Pasture) was a transferred land grant to Mariano Castro, after the death of his relative Francisco M. Estrada.[2][3]
  • 1852 - Stagecoach service begins, and the first stop (near Grant Road and El Camino Real) is formed for service between San Francisco and San Jose. A settlement is formed around this stop.[3]
  • 1854
    • Settlement named "Mountain View", naming is credited by local store keeper and the first postmaster, Jacob Shumway.[4]
    • Public school district opens.[4]
  • 1867 - Rengstorff House (residence) built in Shoreline Park.[4] First Catholic mission of Saint Joseph built under Rev. Fr. Joseph Bixio at El Camino Real and Grant (currently the site of a BMW dealership).[1]
  • 1888 - Mountain View Register newspaper begins publication.[5][6]
  • 1893 - Stanford University professors "investigate" the Castro Indian Mound, also known as Indian Hill, Secondino Robles (in the neighborhood that is now known as Monta Loma) to better understand local Native American customs.[7]

20th century[edit]

  • 1900 - Bank of Mountain View in business.[4]
  • 1901 First Catholic pastor Rev. Fr. John J. Cullen assigned to Mountain View.[1]
  • 1902
    • November 7: Mountain View incorporated.[3]
    • November 7: Mountain View High School opens.[8]
    • "Electric streetlights, telephone service and a municipal water system" begin operating (approximate date).[4]
  • 1904 - Seventh-day Adventist Pacific Press Publishing Association moves to town.[3]
  • 1905
    • Mountain View Public Library established.
    • Farmers and Merchants Bank built.[3]
    • Mariano Castro family donates land for Saint Joseph Parish. Concrete foundations poured at current location 582 Hope Street, at the corner of Castro Street.[1]
  • 1906 - April 18: 1906 San Francisco earthquake.[4]
  • 1909 - Town Hall built.[9]
  • 1924 - The local high school is renamed to Mountain View Union High School and relocated to a larger campus, also serving the neighboring Los Altos and Whisman communities.[8]
  • 1926 - Ambra Olive Oil Company of Mountain View is opened on 987 North Rengstorff Avenue. Founded by Mario Ambra (1887–1968), a native of Pachino, Italy, and his wife Rosaria (1890–1981).[10][11]
  • 1928 - Saint Joseph Catholic Church burned down by arsonist.[1]
  • 1929 - Saint Joseph Catholic Church rebuilt.[1] Murray Harris pipe organ, with pipes cast before the Great Earthquake of 1906 was donated by Saint Ignatius Church in San Francisco.
  • 1930 - Mountain View Theater opens.[12]
  • 1933 - US Naval Air Station, Moffet Field established.[3]
  • 1934
  • 1940: the city became the home of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (now the NASA Ames Research Center), influencing the city's development of its aerospace and electronics industries.[16]
  • 1948 - Construction of Saint Joseph Catholic School on Miramonte Avenue under Rev. Fr. James Doyle.[1]
  • 1950
    • Monte Vista Drive-In cinema in business.[12]
    • Population: 6,563.[17]
  • 1954 - Mountain View Historical Association formed.[18][19]
  • 1955
    • February 24: Birth of Steve Jobs.[20]
    • Mountain View Recreation Commission decided to name McKelvey Park, after John Addison McKelvey of the Mountain View Berry Farm.[21]
  • 1956 - Beckman Instruments' Shockley Semiconductor Laboratory active.[22]
  • 1957 - The construction of San Antonio Shopping Center begins.[4]
  • 1959 - The Jobs family, including young Steve Jobs move to the Monta Loma neighborhood living at 286 Diablo Avenue.[23]
  • 1960 - Population: 30,889.[3]
  • 1964 - Moffett Drive-In Theatre opened[24]
  • 1966 - Mayfield Mall opens (corner of Central Expressway and San Antonio Road)[25]
  • 1967 - The Jobs family, including young Steve Jobs, move away from Mountain View to nearby Cupertino.[23]
  • 1968 - Intel Corporation and Monolithic Memories in business.[22]
  • 1970 - Regional Metropolitan Transportation Commission established.
  • 1972 - Judith Moss became Mountain View's first female councilmember.[26]
  • 1975 - Old Mill Shopping Mall (shopping centre) in business.[4]
  • 1979 - Kannon Do Zen Meditation Center building is founded.[14][27]
  • 1981 - Mountain View Union High School closes, to be relocated and renamed.[8]
  • 1982 - Grid Compass laptop computer introduced.[28]
  • 1983
    • The Meadowlands garbage facility is closed, in order to restore wetlands[29]
    • Mayfield Mall closes (corner of Central Expressway and San Antonio Road)[25]
  • 1985
  • 1986 - Former Mayfield Mall location is converted into Hewlett Packard offices.[25]
  • 1987 - Downtown Mountain View Station opens.
  • 1989
    • the Old Mill Shopping Mall closes
    • Stanford University surrenders the collected artifacts and remains from the Castro Shell Mound (the area is now known as the Monte Loma neighborhood) to the descendants, this includes 550 Ohlone Indian remains.[30][31]
  • 1991
  • 1993
  • 1994 - Santa Clara County government computer network begins operating.[37]
  • 1996 - The Computer Museum (now called the Computer History Museum) moves part of the unused museum collection from Boston, Massachusetts to Mountain View and it's stored in a former Moffett Field building.[38]
  • 1995 - The Crossings, a housing community is built over the Old Mill Shopping Mall[29]
  • 1997 - City website online (approximate date).[39]
  • 1999
    • The Computer Museum moves the remainder of the museum collection to Mountain View and renamed to The Computer Museum History Center.[40]
    • Google Inc. in business.[4]

21st century[edit]

  • 2000 - Rosemary Stasek becomes mayor[41]
  • 2001 - Mario Ambra becomes mayor[42]
  • 2002
  • 2003 - Mike Kasperzak becomes mayor
  • 2004 - Matt Pear becomes mayor[45]
  • 2005
    • Matt Neely becomes mayor[46]
    • The old pump windmill is relocated to the Rengstorff House, formerly located at Mountain View Grant Road Farm.[47]
  • 2006
    • Nick Galiotto becomes mayor[48]
    • The Jehning Lock Museum opens at 175 Castro Street, featuring one of the largest collections of locks and keys.[49]
  • 2007 - Laura Macias becomes the city's second Mexican-American woman to be mayor[50]
  • 2008 - Tom Means becomes mayor[51]
  • 2009 - Margaret Abe-Koga becomes Mountain View's first female Asian-American mayor[52]
  • 2010
    • Population: 74,066.[53]
    • Ronit Bryant becomes mayor[54]
  • 2011
    • Jac Siegel becomes mayor[55]
    • Dan Rich becomes city manager[56]
    • The Computer History Museum reopens, after a two-year, $19 million remodel.[57]
  • 2012
    • Mike Kasperzak becomes mayor[58]
  • 2013
    • John Inks becomes mayor[59]
    • Google leases the former Mayfield Mall location (corner of Central Expressway and San Antonio Road)[60]
  • 2014 - Chris Clark becomes mayor.[61]
  • 2015
    • John McAlister becomes mayor. [62]
  • 2016
  • 2017
    • Ken Rosenberg becomes mayor[67]
    • Rental Housing Committee appointed[68]
  • 2018
    • Lenny Siegel becomes mayor[69]
  • 2019

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Parish History". Saint Joseph Parish History. Retrieved 2019-02-27.
  2. ^ a b "Mountain View History". City of Mountain View. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Perry, Nicholas (2012). Mountain View, Then & Now. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 978-0738595764.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Stickler, Diana (2007-02-24). "A look back: Timeline of Mountain View history". The Mercury News. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  5. ^ a b "US Newspaper Directory". Chronicling America. Washington DC: Library of Congress. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  6. ^ American Newspaper Annual, N. W. Ayer & Son, 1921, hdl:2027/coo.31924087717553
  7. ^ Cady, Theron G. (1948). "Tales of the San Francisco Peninsula". Monta Loma Neighborhood. Peninsula Life Magazine, C-T Publishers. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  8. ^ a b c Santuario, Angel (2010-11-07). "Then & Now: Mountain View Union High School". Mountain View Patch. Patch Media. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  9. ^ "City History". City of Mountain View. Retrieved January 30, 2016. (timeline)
  10. ^ "Back view of the Ambra factory". Calisphere. Retrieved 2020-01-22.
  11. ^ "The Ambra Olive Oil Co. sign". Internet Archive. 1995.
  12. ^ a b c "Movie Theaters in Mountain View, CA". CinemaTreasures.org. Los Angeles: Cinema Treasures LLC. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  13. ^ "About the Association". Mountain View Historical Association. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  14. ^ a b Pluralism Project. "Mountain View, California". Directory of Religious Centers. Harvard University. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  15. ^ "History". Mountain View Buddhist Temple. 2017. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  16. ^ "Mountain View, California, United States". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved February 19, 2018.
  17. ^ Webster's Geographical Dictionary, Springfield, Massachusetts: G. & C. Merriam Co., 1960, p. 737, OL 5812502M
  18. ^ American Association for State and Local History (2002). Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada (15th ed.). ISBN 0759100020.
  19. ^ "History". Mountain View Historical Association. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  20. ^ Ernie Gross (1990). This Day in American History. Neal-Schuman. ISBN 978-1-55570-046-1.
  21. ^ "City Ball Park May Be Named After MV Pioneer Resident". Mountain View Register Leader. June 9, 1955.
  22. ^ a b c "The Silicon Engine: a Timeline of Semiconductors in Computers". Mountain View, California: Computer History Museum. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  23. ^ a b DeBolt, Daniel (2011). "Steve Jobs called Mountain View home as a child". Mountain View Voice. Retrieved 2020-01-22.
  24. ^ a b "Cinemas Around the World - Moffett Drive-In Theatre, Mountain View CA". CinemaTour. Retrieved 2017-04-16.
  25. ^ a b c Perry, Nick (2004-10-15). "Mayfield Mall Once a Hot Item". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Publishing Company. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  26. ^ Orr, John. "Mountain View: Former mayor Judith Moss honored by council". The Mercury News. The Mercury News. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  27. ^ "History". Kannon Do Zen Meditation Center. 2015-03-05. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  28. ^ Patrick Robertson (2011). Robertson's Book of Firsts. Bloomsbury. ISBN 978-1-60819-738-5.
  29. ^ a b c Ratnikas, Algirdas. "SF Bay Area 2000". Retrieved 2017-04-11.
  30. ^ Smith, Cheryl. "The First Inhabitants of Our Neighborhood History". Monta Loma Neighborhood. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  31. ^ Gross, Jane; Times, Special to The New York (1989-06-24). "Stanford Agrees to Return Ancient Bones to Indians". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2017-11-25.
  32. ^ "Historic Rengstorff House". City of Mountain View. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  33. ^ "Marv Owen, 85, Dies; Tiger Infielder in 30's". The New York Times. 1991-06-27. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-01-22.
  34. ^ "About Us | Mountain View Online |". www.mv-voice.com. Retrieved 2017-04-11.
  35. ^ Civic Impulse, LLC. "Members of Congress". GovTrack. Washington, DC. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  36. ^ "California". Official Congressional Directory. Washington DC: Government Printing Office. 1993. hdl:2027/uc1.l0072691827.
  37. ^ "NII Awards 1995". USA: National Information Infrastructure Awards. Archived from the original on January 1997.
  38. ^ "Museum History". Computer History Museum. Retrieved 2017-07-07.
  39. ^ "City of Mountain View Home Page". City of Mountain View. Archived from the original on January 1997.
  40. ^ a b "Museum History (timeline)". Computer History Museum. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  41. ^ Waters, Dick (January 12, 2001). "Mario Ambra named mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Publishing Company. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  42. ^ Waters, Dick (January 12, 2001). "Mario Ambra named mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Publishing Company. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  43. ^ Gathright, Alan (April 19, 2002). "Embattled councilman resigns". SF Gate. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  44. ^ "Ambra guilty of misconduct". mv-voice.com. April 19, 2002. Retrieved 2020-01-22.
  45. ^ O'Shea, Julie (January 16, 2004). "Pear voted in as mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Publishing Company. Retrieved 8 February 2019.
  46. ^ Wiener, Jon (January 7, 2005). "Neely named MV mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Publishing Company. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  47. ^ "Inherit The Wind". The Friends of "R" House. 2007. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  48. ^ Wiener, Jon (January 13, 2006). "Galiotto's turn at the top". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Publishing Company. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  49. ^ "Jehning Lock Museum of Mountain View - Oddball Museums". Waymarking.com. 2012. Retrieved 2017-07-07.
  50. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (January 12, 2007). "New council takes over". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  51. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (Jan 10, 2008). "Tom Means named new mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  52. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (Jan 9, 2009). "Historic moment at City Hall". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  53. ^ "Mountain View city, California". State & County QuickFacts. US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2016.
  54. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (Jan 6, 2010). "Ronit Bryant is new mayor of Mountain View". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  55. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (Jan 5, 2011). "Siegel picked for mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  56. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (May 27, 2011). "New manager happy with 'dream job'". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  57. ^ "Press Releases|". Computer History Museum. 2011-01-12. Retrieved 2017-07-07.
  58. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (Jan 3, 2012). "Kasperzak says he'd be 'accessible' as mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  59. ^ DeBolt, Daniel (Jan 10, 2013). "Inks named mayor, Clark makes vice mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  60. ^ Avalos, George (2013-08-14). "Google leases huge space in Mountain View". The Mercury News. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  61. ^ "Clark, McAlister to lead City Council in 2014", Mountain View Online, Embarcadero Media, January 8, 2014
  62. ^ Noack, Mark. "Outgoing mayor leaves 'em laughing". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  63. ^ "Mountain View: Showalter picked as new mayor", San Jose Mercury News, January 6, 2016
  64. ^ "Teslas in the Trailer Park: A California City Faces Its Housing Squeeze", New York Times, November 13, 2016
  65. ^ Golgowski, Nina (2016-11-13). "History Teacher Removed From Classroom For Comparing Trump To Hitler". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  66. ^ "A 40-Year Teaching Career Ending After Trump/Hitler Comparison in Mountain View". KQED News. 2016-11-22. Retrieved 2017-04-15.
  67. ^ Noack, Mark (January 12, 2017). "New mayor pledges civility and courtesy in 2017". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  68. ^ Noack, Mark (April 19, 2017). "Last-minute change to rental committee". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media. Retrieved 7 February 2019.
  69. ^ Noack, Mark (January 10, 2018). "Longtime Mountain View activist named mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media.
  70. ^ Noack, Mark (January 19, 2019). "Mountain View debuts new council, picks new mayor". Mountain View Voice. Embarcadero Media.
  71. ^ "Mayor Lisa Matichak Summary Biography". City of Mountain View. Retrieved 2019-02-27.

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]