Tom Dolan

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Tom Dolan
Personal information
Full nameThomas Fitzgerald Dolan
Nickname(s)"Tom"
National team United States
Born (1975-09-15) September 15, 1975 (age 43)
Arlington, Virginia
Height6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)
Weight190 lb (86 kg)
Sport
SportSwimming
StrokesIndividual medley
ClubClub Wolverine
College teamUniversity of Michigan

Thomas Fitzgerald Dolan (born September 15, 1975) is an American former competition swimmer, two-time Olympic champion, and former world record-holder.

Dolan grew up in Arlington, Virginia. He attended the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he swam for coach Jon Urbanchek's Michigan Wolverines swimming and diving team in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) competition from 1994 to 1997.[1] During his college swimming career, he won individual NCAA national championships in the 500-yard freestyle (1995, 1996), 1,650-yard freestyle (1995, 1996), and 400-yard individual medley (1995, 1996), and was a member of three of Michigan's winning teams in the 800-yard freestyle relay (1994, 1995, 1996).[1][2]

Dolan represented the United States at two consecutive Summer Olympics.[3] At the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta, Georgia, he won a gold medal in the men's 400-meter individual medley, finishing with a time 4:14.90.[3][4] He also competed in the men's 200-meter individual medley, placing seventh in the event final with a time 2:03.89.[3][5]

Four years later at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia, Dolan again won a gold medal in the men's 400-meter individual medley, and setting a new world record of 4:11.76 in the final.[3][6] He also received the silver medal for his second-place performance in the men's 200-meter individual medley (1:59.77).[3][7]

Dolan was inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame as an "Honor Swimmer" in 2006,[8] and the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in 2009. He now runs the Tom Dolan Swim School in Northern Virginia, teaching infants to adults—solid fundamentals that are essential for water-safety, recreational and competitive swimming.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b MGoBlue.com, Men's Swimming & Diving, Michigan Men's Swimming and Diving All-Time NCAA Champions. Retrieved February 17, 2013.
  2. ^ HickokSports.com, Sports History, NCAA Men's Swimming & Diving Champions Archived February 23, 2002, at the Library of Congress Web Archives. Retrieved February 17, 2013.
  3. ^ a b c d e Sports-Reference.com, Olympic Sports, Athletes, Men's 400 metres Individual Medley Final. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  4. ^ Sports-Reference.com, Olympic Sports, Swimming at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games, Men's 400 metres Individual Medley Final. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  5. ^ Sports-Reference.com, Olympic Sports, Swimming at the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games, Men's 200 metres Individual Medley Final. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  6. ^ Sports-Reference.com, Olympic Sports, Swimming at the 2000 Sydney Summer Games, Men's 400 metres Individual Medley Final. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  7. ^ Sports-Reference.com, Olympic Sports, Swimming at the 2000 Sydney Summer Games, Men's 200 metres Individual Medley Final. Retrieved April 16, 2013.
  8. ^ International Swimming Hall of Fame, Honorees, Tom Dolan (USA). Retrieved March 16, 2015.
  9. ^ Tom Dolan Swim School, About Us. Retrieved April 16, 2013.

External links[edit]


Records
Preceded by
Tamás Darnyi
Men's 400-meter individual medley
world record-holder (long course)

September 11, 1994 – August 15, 2002
Succeeded by
Michael Phelps