Tricasses

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The Tricasses were a Gallic tribe which lived along the Seine in what is now Champagne. They gave their name to Troyes, which bore the name Augustobona during the Roman period and served as the capital of the Tricasses. Administratively they were attached to Gallia Lugdunensis. Their neighbours were the Suessiones and Remi to the north, the Leuci to the south, and the Senones to the west. This people was not known to Julius Caesar who included the Tricasses with the Senones but it seems that his adopted son and successor Augustus did know them. He differentiated the Senones of the Tricasses and was the one who more or less founded the city of Troyes giving it the latin name of Augustobona which means "city of Augustus".

Etymology[edit]

The name Tricasses comes from the element cass- found in other names of tribes and individuals, e.g. Veliocasses, Cassivellaunus, It may signify "bronze, tin or brass",[1] or alternatively "fine or pleasant":[2] [3] these two meaning arise from different interpretations of the name of the Cassiterides. The prefix tri- is found in Trigaranus with the meaning of "three".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Encyclopédie de l'Arbre Celtique. Mots et étymons de la langue gauloise : minéraux / roches / métaux
  2. ^ J. A. MacCulloch (1911). The Religion of the Ancient Celts. Chapter III. The Gods of Gaul and the Continental Celts.
  3. ^ Encyclopédie Marikavel des noms de personnes
  4. ^ Encyclopédie de l'Arbre Celtique. Garanus : (grue)