WNTD

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WNTD
CityChicago, Illinois
Broadcast areaChicago market
BrandingRelevant Radio
Frequency950 kHz
First air dateApril 7, 1922 (date first licensed)[1]
FormatCatholic Teaching
Power1,000 watts (day)
5,000 watts (night)
ClassB
Transmitter coordinates41°51′39″N 87°41′12″W / 41.86083°N 87.68667°W / 41.86083; -87.68667 (day)
41°38′12″N 87°33′10″W / 41.63667°N 87.55278°W / 41.63667; -87.55278 (night)
Former callsignsWAAF (1922-1967)[1]
WGRT (1967-1973)
WJPC (1973[1]-1994)[2]
WEJM (1994-1997)[2]
WIDB (1997-1999)[2]
AffiliationsRelevant Radio
OwnerStarboard Media Foundation
(Starboard Media Foundation, Inc.)
Sister stationsWKBM, WWCA
WebcastListen Live
Websitehttps://relevantradio.com

WNTD is an AM radio station in Chicago, Illinois. It is owned by Starboard Media Foundation, Inc. Its frequency is 950 AM and has separate day-time (1000 watts; non-directional) and night-time (5000 watts; directional) transmitter locations. It is currently one of three stations in the Chicago market that airs Relevant Radio, a Catholic talk format, 24 hours a day.[3]

History[edit]

WAAF[edit]

The station was licensed by the FCC on April 7, 1922.[1] It was one of the first radio stations licensed. It was owned by the Chicago Daily Drover's Journal, with its transmitter and studios at the Union Stock Yards.[4][1][5] Its original call letters were WAAF.[4][1] The station originally broadcast at 620 and 830 kHz.[6][7] By 1923, the station's frequency had been changed to 1050 kHz.[8][9] By 1925 the station was broadcasting at 1080 kHz, running 200 watts.[10][11] By 1927, the station's power had been increased to 500 watts, and the station's frequency was changed to 770 kHz.[1] In 1928, the station's frequency was changed to 920 kHz.[1] The station operated during daytime hours only.[1]

The station's programming was initially devoted to trade news, but in 1929, its programming was broadened.[5] The station would air a variety of music programs, along with news, live market reports, and a variety of other programs.[12][13]

The station's transmitter and studios were destroyed in the 1934 Stock Yards fire.[5][1] The station broadcast live coverage of the fire until smoke and heat forced them to leave the building.[5] The station's studios were moved to the Palmer House following the fire.[5][1]

In 1936, the station's power was increased to 1,000 watts.[1] In 1941, the station's frequency was changed to 950 kHz.[1] In the 1940s, the station aired orchestral music and popular music.[4] In 1948, the station's studios were moved to the LaSalle-Wacker Building.[14][5][1]

In 1955, the station began airing "Juke Box Matinee", hosted by Hal Fredericks, in association with the Recorded Music Service Association and the Chicago Juke Box Operators' Association.[15][16] The show featured a monthly "Hunch Tune", which would be promoted on the show and featured as the No. 1 selection in juke boxes.[16][17] The first "Hunch Tune" was "Rollin' Stone" by Eddie Fontaine.[17]

In 1956, the station adopted a jazz format.[18] Personalities heard on the station during its jazz years included Marty Faye, Daddy-O Daylie, Olympic gold medalist Jesse Owens, and Dick Buckley.[18][19][20]

WGRT[edit]

WNTD's daytime tower atop Midland Warehouses

In 1967, the station was sold to a corporation formed by Ralph Atlass, for $900,000.[21][1] The station's call sign was changed to WGRT ("W-Great!") and it adopted a soul music format.[22] Daddy-O Daylie continued as a DJ on WGRT, hosting a morning jazz program.[23][24] Daylie's jazz program was initially two hours long, but was reduced to an hour and a half, and eventually a half hour in 1971.[23][24] In 1971, the station's transmitter was moved to the Midland Warehouses on Western Avenue in Chicago.[1]

WJPC[edit]

On May 29, 1973, the station was purchased by Johnson Publishing Company for $1,800,000.[25][26] On November 1, 1973, the station's call sign was changed to WJPC.[26] The station aired an urban contemporary format.[27] Disc jockeys included Tom Joyner and LaDonna Tittle.[28] Daddy-O Daylie hosted a Sunday jazz program.[29][28] In 1980, the station began nighttime operations, running 5,000 watts using a directional array.[1][28] In the late 1980s and early 90s the station simulcast the soft urban contemporary format of its sister station 106.3 WLNR in Lansing, Illinois, and was branded "Soft Touch".[30][31][32] At Noon on July 15, 1992, the station began airing an all-rap format.[33][34]

106 Jamz[edit]

In 1994, Johnson Publishing sold the station, along with 106.3 WJPC-FM, to Broadcasting Partners for $8 million.[25][35] In June 1994, the station became "106 Jamz", airing an urban contemporary format as a simulcast of 106.3 WJPC-FM.[36][37] The station's call sign was changed to WEJM later that year, with its FM simulcast partner taking the call sign WEJM-FM.[2][38] In spring of 1997, the station was sold to Douglas Broadcasting for $7.5 million.[25][39][40] In June 1997, its FM sister station left the simulcast, adopting an urban gospel format as 106.3 WYBA.[41]

One-on-One Sports[edit]

On August 28, 1997, WEJM 950's format was changed to sports, as a One-on-One Sports affiliate.[42][43] Around this time, the station was purchased by One-on-One for $10 million.[25][44] In November 1997, the station's call sign was changed to WIDB.[2] One-On-One was headquartered in suburban Northbrook.[42] The One-on-One Sports affiliation moved to WJKL on March 1, 1999, though the One-on-One Sports format continued to simulcast on WIDB until May 1999.[45][46]

WNTD[edit]

In 1999, the station was sold to Radio Unica for $16,750,000.[47] In May 1999, the station began airing a Spanish-language news-talk format as Radio Unica.[45][46][48][49] The station's callsign was changed to WNTD that month.[2] Personalities heard on Radio Unica included Paul Bouche and Dra. Isabel, among others.[50][51] Ricardo Brown was news director.[51][50] In 2004, Multicultural Radio Broadcasting acquired Radio Unica's 15 radio stations for $150 million.[52][53][54]

WNTD was the original affiliate of Air America Radio in Chicago.[55] Program hosts included Al Franken, Randi Rhodes, Janeane Garofalo, Rachel Maddow, Lizz Winstead and Chuck D.[55] The network launched on March 31, 2004.[55] However, these programs ended after two weeks, on April 14, due to a payment dispute between Multicultural Radio Broadcasting, then owner of WNTD, and Air America Radio.[56] On April 15, a judge ruled that Air America had fully paid for airtime on WNTD and ordered Multicultural to broadcast Air America on the station.[57] However, Air America would only continue on the station through the end of the month.[58] WNTD would return to airing a Spanish language format.[59][60][61]

In 2007, the station was sold to Sovereign City Radio for $15 million.[62][63] In October 2007, Relevant Radio began to air from 6 AM to 6 PM weekdays, while brokered Spanish language programming aired the remainder of the time.[63]

From August 2009, until August 14, 2010, WNTD carried "Avenue 950", programmed by Sovereign City Radio Services, which featured an eclectic mix of jazz, blues, standards, and adult contemporary from 6:00 PM to 5:00 AM.[64][65] Relevant Radio continued to air during the remainder of the station's schedule.[65] On August 15, 2010, the station began airing Relevant Radio full time.[65]

In 2014, the station was sold to Starboard Media Foundation, Inc. for $14.4 million.[66] The transaction was consummated on May 2, 2014.[67]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q History Cards for WNTD, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  3. ^ "WNTD 950 AM Chicago is broadcasting Relevant Radio programming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week". Relevant Radio. 2010-08-15. Retrieved 2010-10-11.
  4. ^ a b c "AM Histories", Broadcasting - Telecasting. October 25, 1948. p. 14. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e f "1922 - Year Radio's Population Soared", Broadcasting. May 14, 1962. p. 96. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  6. ^ Gernsback, H. (1922) Radio For All. p. 271. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  7. ^ Radio Broadcast. Doubleday, Page, and Co. July 1922. p. 276. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  8. ^ Citizens Radio Call Book: A Complete Radio Cyclopedia. Volume 4, November 4. November 1923. p. 13. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  9. ^ The Wireless Age. November 1923. p. 64. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  10. ^ Radio Progress. August 15, 1925. p. 38. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  11. ^ Citizen's Radio Callbook: A Complete Radio Cyclopedia. Vol. 6. No. 2. Fall 1925. p. 14. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  12. ^ Radio and Amusement Guide. Chicago Edition. Vol. 1, No. 16. Week of February 7-13, 1932. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  13. ^ Radio Guide. Chicago Edition. Week of June 11-17, 1933. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  14. ^ "WAAF: A New Home For Chicago's Oldest Call Letters", Broadcasting - Telecasting. October 25, 1948. p. 15. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  15. ^ "Chicago Music Ops Assn. In Full Week Radio Show", Cash Box. May 14, 1955. p. 43. Retrieved September 11, 2018.
  16. ^ a b "Chi Music Trade Promotes 'Juke Matinee' on WAAF", Billboard. May 7, 1955. p. 27. Retrieved September 11, 2018.
  17. ^ a b "RMSA-WAAF Set 'Juke Box Matinee'", Billboard. May 14, 1955. p. 84. Retrieved September 11, 2018.
  18. ^ a b Paige, Earl. "WAAF: Stock in Yards & Jazz", Billboard. November 19, 1966. p. 36. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  19. ^ "Holmes "Daddy-O" Daylie", Rich Samuels. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  20. ^ "Jesse Owens to Switch Chicago Disc Jockey Spots", Jet. April 21, 1960. p. 58. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  21. ^ "Corn Belt Pub. Sells WAAF", Billboard. December 17, 1966. p. 32. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  22. ^ Pruter, Robert (1992). Chicago Soul. University of Illinois Press. p. 17. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  23. ^ a b "Daylie Gets Jazz Program With Media Reps Support", Jet. February 25, 1971. p. 57. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  24. ^ a b "WGRT Specialists' Philosophy", Billboard. February 24, 1968. p. 24. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  25. ^ a b c d Duncan, James H. "Major Station Transactions:1970 to 2003", An American Radio Trilogy 1975 to 2004. Volume 1: The Markets. Duncan's American Radio. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  26. ^ a b One Big Change Deserves Another", Ebony. December 1973. p. 10. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  27. ^ Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands Chicago Tribune Magazine. March 4, 1979. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  28. ^ a b c "Backstage", Ebony. May 1980. p. 22. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  29. ^ "WJPC Hosts Big Bash to Kickoff New Name Change", Jet. November 15, 1973. p. 13. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  30. ^ Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988 & Spring/Summer 1989. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  31. ^ "WLNR FM 106.3", Radio Chicago. Fall 1989. p. 43. Accessed January 4, 2014.
  32. ^ "WLNR FM 106.3", Radio Chicago. p. 54. Spring 1991. Retrieved August 30, 2018.
  33. ^ Nelson, Havelock. "Rap and black radio", Billboard. November 28, 1992. p. R-6. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  34. ^ "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 9, No. 27. July 8, 1992. p. 1. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  35. ^ "Elsewhere", The M Street Journal. Vol. 11 No. 24. June 15, 1994. p. 6. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  36. ^ "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 11 No. 25. June 22, 1994. p. 1. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  37. ^ Heise, Kenan. "Isadore Pink, WEJM Rap Deejay Pinkhouse", Chicago Tribune. November 08, 1996. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  38. ^ Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  39. ^ "Evergreen to Sell 3 Radio Stations for $64.1 Million", The New York Times. April 9, 1997. p. D 4. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  40. ^ Jones, Tim. "Radio Shuffle Continues", Chicago Tribune. April 09, 1997. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  41. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 22. June 4, 1997. p. 1. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  42. ^ a b Hirsley, Michael. "Sports Radio Network Muscles Into Mix", Chicago Tribune. August 29, 1997. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  43. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 35. September 3, 1997. p. 2. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  44. ^ "Elsewhere", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14 No. 35. September 3, 1997. p. 10. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  45. ^ a b Kirk, Jim. "One-on-one Sports Soon Zero For One On AM" Chicago Tribune. February 24, 1999. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  46. ^ a b "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 16 No. 20. May 19, 1999. p. 2. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  47. ^ "Radio Unica Scores In Chicago With WIOB-AM Buy", Radio & Records. February 26, 2018. p. 6. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  48. ^ Lose a pet? Tractor to sell?", Chicago Tribune. March 02, 2003. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  49. ^ The M Street Radio Directory. Ninth Edition. 2000. p. 224. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  50. ^ a b "Radio Unica". Radio Unica. Archived from the original on October 1, 2003. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  51. ^ a b "Radio Unica 2002 Programming Line-up." HispanicAd.com. December 09, 2001. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  52. ^ "Radio Unica vende 15 estaciones AM por 150 millones de dólares", Laredo Morning Times. October 6, 2003. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  53. ^ "Chapter 11 Written for Radio Unica", Radio & Records. December 19, 2003. p. 6. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  54. ^ Application Search Details – BAL-20031015AEP, fcc.gov. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  55. ^ a b c "Left wingin' it", Chicago Tribune. March 31, 2004. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  56. ^ Carney, Steve. "Radio Station Owner Silences Air America in L.A., Chicago", Los Angeles Times. April 15, 2004. Retrieved August 27, 2018.
  57. ^ Cook, John. "Air America restored in Chicago", Chicago Tribune. April 16, 2004. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  58. ^ "Air America Quiet", Chicago Tribune. April 21, 2004. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  59. ^ The Radio Book. 2005-2006. p. 190. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  60. ^ The Radio Book. 2006-2007. p. 193. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  61. ^ The Radio Book. 2007-2008. p. 193. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  62. ^ Asset Purchase Agreement, fcc.gov. June 29, 2007. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  63. ^ a b Feder, Robert. "Split Personality", Chicago Sun-Times. October 24, 2007. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  64. ^ "Sovereign City debuts Avenue 950", Radio & Television Business Report. August 11, 2009. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  65. ^ a b c "Timeless Cool/Avenue 950 Is Moving Away", Chicagoland Radio and Media. August 14, 2010. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
  66. ^ "Asset Purchase Agreement", fcc.gov. December 18, 2013. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  67. ^ Application Search Details, fcc.gov. Retrieved August 29, 2018.

External links[edit]