WPPN

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WPPN
WPPN Amor106.7 Chicago.png
CityDes Plaines, Illinois
Broadcast areaChicago, Illinois
BrandingAmor 106.7
Frequency106.7 MHz
First air dateDecember 3, 1971 (as WYEN)[1]
FormatSpanish AC
ERP50,000 watts
HAAT129 meters (423 ft)
ClassB
Facility ID25053
Former callsignsWYEN (1971[2]-1986)[3]
WZRC (1986-1987)[3]
WTWV (1987-1989)
WYLL (1989-2000)[3]
WYLL-FM (2000-2001)[3]
WZFS (2001-2004)[3]
OwnerUforia Audio Network
(Univision Radio Illinois, Inc.)
Sister stationsWOJO, WRTO, WVIV-FM
Also part of the Univision Cluster: TV Stations WXFT-TV and WGBO-TV
WebcastListen Live
Websiteamor1067.univision.com

WPPN is an FM radio station licensed to Des Plaines, Illinois that targets the Chicago metropolitan area. WPPN broadcasts on 106.7 MHz with a Spanish AC format.

Due to WPPN's 50,000-watt signal and north suburban location, it can be heard through much of the Rockford and Southern Wisconsin area.

History[edit]

Request Radio[edit]

The station began broadcasting December 3, 1971, holding the call sign WYEN.[1][4][2] The station was owned by Walt-West Enterprises.[2] WYEN aired an all-request format branded "Request Radio", playing music requested by listeners.[5][6][7] Contemporary and middle of the road music was played on the station.[5][6][7]

"Request Radio" continued airing on the station through the mid–1980s.[8] In 1986, the station was sold to Flint Metro Mass Media for $8 million.[9][10][11]

Z Rock[edit]

On September 1, 1986 the station's call sign was changed to WZRC, and the station adopted a hard rock/heavy metal format, becoming the first affiliate of the syndicated Z Rock network.[12][13][3]

The Wave[edit]

In October 1987, the station's call sign was changed to WTWV, and the station adopted a new-age/smooth jazz/soft rock format as "The Wave".[14][15][16][13][3] The station was an affiliate of the Satellite Music Network, with programming originating on KTWV in Los Angeles.[14]

WYLL[edit]

Logo as "Chicago's Word"

In 1989, the station was sold to Salem Communications for $9,250,000, and the station adopted a Christian contemporary music format, with its call sign being changed to WYLL.[17][18][19][20][3] However, the format was short lived, as Salem gradually replaced the Christian contemporary music with Christian talk programming.[18]

By 1991, Christian contemporary music was mostly relegated to weekends.[21] Christian talk and teaching programs heard on WYLL included shows hosted by Alistair Begg, Chuck Swindoll, Adrian Rogers, Chuck Smith, Beverly LaHaye, Jay Sekulow, James Dobson, Hank Hanegraaff and Sandy Rios.[22][23] As a Christian talk and teaching station, WYLL was branded "Your Station For Life" and later "Chicago's Word".[22][23][24]

In 2000, Salem acquired WXRT 1160 (formerly known as WJJD) for $29 million.[25] In February 2001, Salem moved the Christian talk programming of WYLL to 1160, along with the WYLL call letters.[26]

The Fish[edit]

Logo as "The Fish"

With the move of WYLL to 1160, 106.7's call sign was temporarily changed to WYLL-FM.[3] In early March 2001, the station adopted Christian contemporary format branded "106.7 The Fish", with the slogan "Safe for the Whole Family".[27][28] The station was launched with "40 days and 40 nights" of commercial free music.[29] Shortly thereafter, the station's call sign was changed to WZFS.[3] "The Fish" branding was also used by Salem for Christian contemporary stations in other markets, such as Atlanta, on WFSH-FM 104.7, and Los Angeles, on 95.9 KFSH-FM.

In 2004, Salem agreed to trade WZFS and KSFB 100.7 (now KVVZ) in the San Francisco area to Univision in exchange for KOBT 100.7 in the Houston area (now KKHT-FM), KHCK 1480 in Dallas (now KNGO), KOSL-FM 94.3 in Sacramento (now KGRB), and 560 WIND in Chicago.[30][31]

Spanish language formats[edit]

On November 1, 2004, Univision launched a Spanish-language adult contemporary format on the station, branded "Pasion 106.7".[32][33] The station's call sign was changed to WPPN shortly thereafter.[3]

In October 2005, Univision tweaked the music blend of WPPN, but left the name and the personalities of "Pasion" in place, with the station shifting to a Spanish oldies/adult hits format.[34][35][36]

On January 28, 2009, sister station WVIV-FM changed its format to Spanish oldies and WPPN adopted a Spanish CHR/Hurban format as "La Kalle."[37][38]

On July 1, 2011, WPPN changed their format back to Spanish adult contemporary, and re-branded as "Pasion 106.7", while the previous "La Kalle" format moved to WVIV-FM 103.1 FM/WVIX 93.5 FM.[37][39][40]

In March 2014, WPPN rebranded as "Amor 106.7".[41]

WPPN also transmits in HD Radio. Spanish Rock music is broadcast on the HD2 station under the name "Planeta Rock - Solamente Rock en Espanol" (Planet Rock - Only Rock in Spanish).[42]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 311-313.
  2. ^ a b c History Cards for WPPN, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  4. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 2000, Broadcasting & Cable, 2000. p. D-137. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  5. ^ a b Hall, Claude. "WYEN Goes All Request", Billboard. September 23, 1972. p. 16. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Broadcasting Yearbook 1975, Broadcasting, 1975. p. C-56. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands", Chicago Tribune Magazine, March 4, 1979. p. 37. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  8. ^ Chicago Radio Guide. Vol. 1, No. 1. May 1985. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  9. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. November 25, 1985. p. 75. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  10. ^ Application Search Details - BALH-19851112HR, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  11. ^ Public Notice Comment - BALH-19851112HR, fcc.gov. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  12. ^ Freeman, Kim. "WYEN Goes From Soft to Hard", Billboard. September 13, 1986. p. 10. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  13. ^ a b Zorn, Eric. "Dawn of a New Age has Metal Maniacs Banging Heads", Chicago Tribune. November 25, 1987. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Freeman, Kim. "Vox Jox", Billboard. October 24, 1987. p. 15. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  15. ^ Broadcasting & Cable Yearbook 1989, Broadcasting & Cable, 1989. p. C-56. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  16. ^ Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Summer 1988. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  17. ^ "Ownership Changes", Broadcasting. October 2, 1989. p. 66. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  18. ^ a b Kampert, Patrick. "Bid For Redemption", Chicago Tribune. September 3, 1991. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  19. ^ "WYLL FM 106.7", Radio Chicago. Fall 1989. p. 63. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  20. ^ Chicagoland Radio Waves, MediaTies. Spring-Summer 1989. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  21. ^ "WYLL FM 106.7", Radio Chicago. Summer 1991. p. 62. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  22. ^ a b "WYLL Program Schedule". WYLL. Archived from the original on January 31, 1997. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  23. ^ a b The Shepherd's Guide. Spring 1994-Spring 1995. p. 97-99.
  24. ^ "Chicago's Word!". WYLL. Archived from the original on February 10, 1998. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  25. ^ Kilgore, Tomi. "Salem buys WXRT-AM from Infinity", MarketWatch. November 11, 2000. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  26. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 18, No. 06. February 7, 2001. p. 1. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  27. ^ "Chicago Media Headlines - March". DJHeadlines.com. March 2001. Archived from the original on October 16, 2009. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  28. ^ "Welcome to 106.7 The Fish". WZFS. Archived from the original on September 27, 2001. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  29. ^ "Chicago Media Headlines - February". DJHeadlines.com. February 2001. Archived from the original on December 20, 2004. Retrieved January 27, 2019.
  30. ^ "Univision Radio and Salem Communications to Exchange Radio Assets", Business Wire. October 4, 2004. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  31. ^ "Univision Radio and Salem Communications to exchange assets", Dallas Business Journal. October 5, 2004. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  32. ^ "106.7 The Fish Gives Way To Pasion", Format Change Archive. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  33. ^ "Univision to Switch Chicago 'Fish' to Spanish AC", Radio & Records. October 29, 2004. p. 3. Retrieved January 14, 2019.
  34. ^ Feder, Robert (October 20, 2005). "New Spanish format embraces classic oldies". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on October 28, 2005. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  35. ^ "Pasion 106.7 FM". Univision. Archived from the original on February 17, 2006. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  36. ^ Devine, Cathy (2006). The Radio Book. 2006-2007 Edition. p. 196. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  37. ^ a b "Univision Radio Chicago Changes Station Formats", Chicagoland Radio and Media. July 5, 2011. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  38. ^ Devine, Cathy (2009). The Radio Book. 2009-2010 Edition. p. 203. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  39. ^ "Univision rebranding WVIV in Chicago", Radio & Television Business Report. November 30, 2011. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  40. ^ Feder, Robert. "FM news war could break out with Newsradio simulcast", Time Out Chicago. June 29, 2011. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  41. ^ Venta, Lance. "WPPN Turns its Pasion to Amor", Radio Insight. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  42. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-10-09. Retrieved 2015-12-12.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)

External links[edit]


Coordinates: 42°08′13″N 87°58′59″W / 42.137°N 87.983°W / 42.137; -87.983