Wikipedia:WikiProject LGBT studies/LGBT in Canada work group

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WikiProject LGBT in Canada
Shortcut WP:CANQUEER, WP:CANLGBT
Category LGBT in Canada
Parent
project(s)
LGBT studies, Canada

Welcome to the LGBT in Canada work group of WikiProject LGBT studies! This group was formed to better coordinate efforts to create and improve articles on LGBT topics and personalities in Canada.

Scope[edit]

This group includes within its scope all articles related to LGBT topics, personalities, history and culture in Canada. It exists primarily as a way to improve Wikipedia's ability to identify topics in need of attention, such as missing articles, articles with sourcing problems, articles which need expansion, and on and so forth.

Participants[edit]

Projects[edit]

Ongoing[edit]

New articles needed[edit]

People[edit]

Note that this list is meant to keep track of potential article topics. Reliable source coverage, demonstrating that a person passes one or more of our inclusion criteria, is always needed to support an article, so not everybody listed here will necessarily always qualify for an article under current circumstances; however, their notability may improve in the future as more sources become available. Do not start an unsourced or primary-sourced article about a person listed here just to assert their mere existence.

Events[edit]

Organizations[edit]

Media[edit]

Notability to be determined[edit]

  • The Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives maintains a National Portrait Collection of individuals who have been deemed significant figures in Canadian LGBT history. The following inductees should all be considered as potential article topics, depending on the depth of additional sourcing that can be located about them, but may not all necessarily be sufficiently notable for inclusion in Wikipedia: Elmer Bagares, Chris Bearchall, Rick Bébout, Anne Bishop, Bernard Courte, Harold Desmarais, C.M. Donald, John Duggan, Sara Ellen Dunlop, Gloria Eshkibok, John Fisher, Amy Gottlieb, Charlie Hill, Richard Hudler, David Kelley, Denis Leblanc, Bev Lepischak, Alan Li, Tim McCaskill, Peter Millard, Bonte Minnema, Pat Murphy, Carmen Paquette, Neil Richards, Marie Robertson, Kyle Scanlon, Douglas Stewart, Shelley Tremain, Susan Ursel. Numerous other inductees do already have Wikipedia articles — see the bluelinks at Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives#National Portrait Collection — although some of them may still need to have this distinction added to their separate articles.
  • Inductees into the Vancouver-based Q Hall of Fame Canada should also be considered as potential article topics, although again further sourcing is needed rather than relying on this distinction alone: Ted Northe (note that his name is currently a piped redirect to Imperial Court System rather than to an independent article), Rick Bébout, Karen Busby, Jeremy Dias, Dogwood Monarchist Society, Kevin Dale McKeown, NiQ, Cynthia Petersen, Mirha-Soleil Ross, Garth Wiens.

Sourcing issues[edit]

People who are culturally identified with the LGBT community in Canada, or have been named in association with it in one or more unsatisfactory sources, but whose articles do not actually cite proper sources to allow them to be categorized or described as being LGBT in their current state. Some may not actually be LGBT at all and may have been claimed in error by the identifying sources, while others are LGBT and can be more adequately sourced as such than they currently are — either way, the attention of this project is needed for confirmation and sourcing improvement if appropriate:

  • Reid Anderson has a profile on the Mark S. Bonham Centre's "QueerBio" database
  • John Baird is fairly widely understood to be openly gay in his personal life, such that his sexuality is frequently alluded to, coyly or otherwise, by third parties writing or speaking about him; however, as of 2015 nobody has ever found any media source in which Baird has actually spoken on the record about his own sexuality one way or the other. Accordingly, he cannot be described or categorized as gay on Wikipedia as things currently stand; however, due to continued attempts to categorize him as such on the basis of the aforementioned unsatisfactory sources, his article requires regular monitoring for this issue. Wikipedians should, however, also remain conscious of the possibility that a more valid source may emerge in the future.
  • Louky Bersianik is covered in some studies of lesbian literature in Canada; however, these sources do not adequately clarify whether she identified as lesbian or bisexual, or is simply included because of the sometimes fuzzy line between lesbian and feminist literature. A clearer, more unambiguous citation is needed.
  • Luc Bradet is included in The Queerstory Files' list of out LGBT Olympians
  • Manon Briand's biographical sketch in Thomas Waugh's Romance of Transgression in Canada: Queering Sexualities, Nations, Cinemas speaks extensively about the LGBT context of her work, yet falls short of a clear and unambiguous statement as to whether she identifies herself as lesbian or bisexual.
  • Édith Butler has a profile on the Mark S. Bonham Centre's "QueerBio" database
  • Margaret Christakos is covered in some studies of lesbian literature in Canada; however, these sources do not adequately clarify whether she specifically identifies as lesbian or bisexual, or is simply included because of the sometimes fuzzy line between lesbian and feminist literature. A clearer, more unambiguous citation is needed.
  • Afua Cooper
  • Sara Diamond has a profile on the Mark S. Bonham Centre's "QueerBio" database
  • Robert Finch is included in John Barton and Billeh Nickerson's anthology Seminal: The Anthology of Canada's Gay Male Poets, but I cannot find an actual biographical source for his sexuality besides the fact that John Sutherland once called him a "dandified versifier" in a review.
  • Bill Graham was once sued by a man who claimed to have had a sexual relationship with Graham; while unacceptably biased POV sources have seized on and continue to promulgate the incident as prima facie proof that Graham is LGBT, in reality the case never actually made it to trial due to the plaintiff's unreliability as a witness — and reliable source coverage of the matter is virtually nonexistent (even that which existed at the time has since been excised from virtually all publicly accessible databases), meaning that under WP:BLP rules it's impossible for us to say anything about it at all. However, people do still occasionally attempt to add it to the article on the basis of the unacceptable sources — so the article requires monitoring for this.
  • Hiromi Goto
  • Chris Gudgeon was claimed as openly bisexual in the original draft of his current article, but this was removed under WP:BLPCAT as not properly sourced
  • Reg Hartt is implied as gay in some sources
  • Luis Jacob
  • Lyndon Johnston is included in The Queerstory Files' list of out LGBT Olympians
  • Julie Joosten's book Light Light was nominated for two lesbian-specific literary awards (Lambda Literary Award, Golden Crown Literary Society), but an editor claiming to be Joosten herself removed LGBT-related categories from the article without explanation
  • Miodrag Kojadinović
  • Robert Lalonde - writer
  • Augusta La Paix
  • Annette Lapointe is described as bisexual in unsatisfactory sources like examiner.com, but a better source has not yet been located.
  • Dorothy Livesay wrote some lesbian-themed poetry later in her life, although I have not yet located a source which clarifies whether she was writing from personal experience or whether this is another "sometimes blurry line between lesbian and feminist literature" situation.
  • Tanzeel Merchant serves on the advisory board of Proud Politics, an organization for LGBT people in politics; however, this does not in and of itself prove that he's specifically LGBT, rather than just a supporter of diversity initiatives. Further clarification needed if possible.
  • Peter Milliken appears in the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund's directory of "Out LGBT Officeholders", and Frank certainly implied it a few times — however, to date no satisfactory sources have been found to clarify that he actually identifies as gay and is not just the subject of an inaccurate rumour (or confusion with someone else.)
  • John Moore is claimed as gay in some unreliable sources
  • Jack Nichols has a profile on the Mark S. Bonham Centre's "QueerBio" database
  • Andre Noble
  • David Oliver has a profile on the Mark S. Bonham Centre's "QueerBio" database
  • Ann Peel has a profile on the Mark S. Bonham Centre's "QueerBio" database, but the closest I can find to a source for it is an article in which she calls herself an ally of LGBT athletes and says nothing about being one herself
  • Pierre Pettigrew was, like Milliken, occasionally claimed as an "avid pianist" in Frank, but to date no reliable sources have ever addressed his sexuality one way or the other.
  • Meredith Quartermain is associated with lesbian poetry in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics: Fourth Edition
  • Leslie Roberts was also occasionally claimed as an "avid pianist" in Frank
  • Emanuel Sandhu is included in The Queerstory Files' list of out LGBT Olympians
  • George Stanley
  • Sharon Thesen is associated with lesbian poetry in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics: Fourth Edition
  • Andrew Thomson is named in this Daily Xtra article as having been one of the defeated LGBT candidates in the Canadian federal election, 2015, even though unlike any other candidate named in the article I can find no reliably sourceable evidence that Thomson is or has ever been out as gay or bisexual
  • Max Valiquette has a profile on the Mark S. Bonham Centre's "QueerBio" database
  • Todd van der Heyden is claimed as gay in some unreliable sources
  • Yolande Villemaire
  • Bronwen Wallace is associated with lesbian poetry in The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics: Fourth Edition
  • Phyllis Webb
  • Cathleen With
  • Cajjmere Wray
  • Paul Yee was previously added to Category:LGBT writers from Canada, possibly out of unsourced personal knowledge by the editor and possibly just because an assumption that having written an LGBT-themed novel (Money Boy) automatically implied that the author had to be gay — however, sources which actually state that he's LGBT are lacking.

Sources[edit]

A list of sources that may be of use to this workgroup: