150s BC

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 3rd century BC2nd century BC1st century BC
Decades: 180s BC 170s BC 160s BC150s BC140s BC 130s BC 120s BC
Years: 159 BC 158 BC 157 BC 156 BC 155 BC 154 BC 153 BC 152 BC 151 BC 150 BC
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

150s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 159 BC 158 BC 157 BC 156 BC 155 BC 154 BC 153 BC 152 BC 151 BC 150 BC

159 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • With the Seleucid victory in Judea over the Maccabees, Alcimus is re-established as the Jewish high priest and a strong force is left in Jerusalem to support him. However, he does not enjoy his triumph for long as he dies soon after from a paralytic stroke.

Bactria[edit]

158 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

157 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The Carthaginians, prevented by their treaty with Rome from engaging in armed resistance, but equally guaranteed against any loss of territory, appeal to Rome against the depredations of King Masinissa of Numidia. The Roman censor Marcus Porcius Cato heads a commission which arbitrates a truce between Carthage and her former ally, Masinissa.
  • During his time in Carthage, Cato is so struck by the evidence of Carthaginian prosperity that he is convinced that the security of Rome now depends on the annihilation of Carthage. From this time on, Cato keeps repeating the cry "Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam" ("Moreover, I advise that Carthage must be destroyed") at the end of all his speeches, no matter what subject they concern.
  • After Ariarathes V has been deposed from the Cappadocian throne by the Seleucid king Demetrius I Soter and has fled to Rome, the new king of Cappadocia, Orophernes, sends two ambassadors to Rome to join the Seleucid emissaries of Demetrius in opposing Ariarathes V's return to power. Despite their efforts, Ariarathes V is restored to his throne by the Romans. However, Rome allows Orophernes to reign jointly with him. The joint government, however, does not last long, as Ariarathes V becomes sole king of Cappadocia shortly afterwards.

Seleucid Empire[edit]

156 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The first Dalmatian war begins.

155 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Hispania[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Bactria[edit]

154 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Hispania[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

Egypt[edit]

China[edit]

153 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The uprisings in Rome's Hispanic provinces oblige the year's consuls to take office earlier than the traditional date of 15 March, a change that becomes permanent. Some suggest that, as a consequence, January 1 becomes the first day of the Roman year.

Seleucid Empire[edit]

Greece[edit]

152 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • The pretender to the Seleucid throne, Alexander Balas, makes contact with Jonathan Maccabeus offering him terms even more favorable than those offered by the king Demetrius I Soter. In particular, Alexander offers him the official appointment as High Priest in Jerusalem. In response, Jonathan withdraws his support from Demetrius and declares his allegiance to Alexander. Thus Jonathan becomes the first member of his family to achieve appointment as High Priest.

151 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

  • The Carthaginian debt to Rome is fully repaid, meaning that, according to Carthage, the treaty with Rome, which was put in place at the end of the Second Punic War, is no longer in force. The Romans do not agree with this interpretation. Instead they view the treaty as a permanent declaration of Carthaginian subordination to Rome.
  • Numidia launches another border raid on Carthaginian soil, besieging a town. In response Carthage launches a large military expedition (25,000 soldiers) to repel the Numidian invaders.

Roman Republic[edit]

India[edit]

150 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

  • The Roman Senate shows displeasure with Carthage's decision to wage war against its neighbour without Roman consent, and tells Carthage that in order to avoid a war it has to "satisfy the Roman People". The Roman censor, Cato the Elder, urges the destruction of Carthage and the Roman Senate orders the gathering of an army.

Seleucid Empire[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

  • Nicomedes, the son of king Prusias II of Bithynia, who has been sent to Rome to argue for smaller reparations arising from his father's unsuccessful war against Pergamum, gains the support of the Roman Senate to the point where Prusias sends an emissary with secret orders to assassinate Nicomedes. However, the emissary reveals the plot to Nicomedes and persuades him to rebel against his father.
  • Mithridates V Euergetes succeeds his uncle Mithridates IV Philopator Philadelphus as king of Pontus. He continues the strategy of maintaining an alliance with the Romans which was started by his predecessor.

Hispania[edit]

  • The Romans, led by praetor Servius Sulpicius Galba, defeat the Lusitanians in a major battle in Hispania. He then breaks his promise to the defeated Lusitanian rebels by instituting a massacre of 9,000 of their number during the peace talks. Later 20,000 more Lusitanians are sold as slaves in Gaul.

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]