230s BC

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries: 4th century BC3rd century BC2nd century BC
Decades: 260s BC 250s BC 240s BC230s BC220s BC 210s BC 200s BC
Years: 239 BC 238 BC 237 BC 236 BC 235 BC 234 BC 233 BC 232 BC 231 BC 230 BC
Categories: BirthsDeathsArchitecture
EstablishmentsDisestablishments

230s BC: events by year[edit]

Contents: 239 BC 238 BC 237 BC 236 BC 235 BC 234 BC 233 BC 232 BC 231 BC 230 BC

239 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

  • Concerned that Hamilcar Barca's leniency in pardoning those who he has captured who have participated in the Mercenary War will encourage others to defect, Mathos and Spendius order the mutilation and execution of "about seven hundred" Carthaginian prisoners, including Gesco. With the mercenaries jointly guilty of these atrocities, defectors dare not face Carthaginian justice under Hamilcar.
  • Carthage is besieged by the mercenary armies, while the city of Utica revolts and attempts to secede from Carthage. Carthage appeals to Hiero II of Syracuse and to Rome for aid against the mercenaries. However, the mercenary leaders reject the efforts of Roman mediators.
  • Sardinia revolts against Carthage and Rome takes the opportunity to annex the island.

Greece[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • Seleucus II's brother Antiochus Hierax, who is governor of Seleucid Anatolia, sends an army into Syria ostensibly to assist Seleucus but actually to seize the rest of the empire. After achieving peace with Egypt, Seleucus II promptly invades Anatolia and begins the "War of the Brothers".

Persia[edit]

Korea[edit]

238 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

  • Hamilcar Barca strikes at the supply lines of the mercenary army besieging Carthage, forcing them to cease the siege of the city. He then fights a series of running engagements with the mercenary armies, keeping them off balance. Hamilcar manages to force the mercenary armies into a box canyon in the Battle of "The Saw". The mercenaries are besieged in the canyon.
  • The mercenary army, under the leadership of Spendius, attempts to fight its way out of the siege but is totally defeated by the Carthaginian forces led by Hamilcar Barca. After the battle, Hamilcar executes some 40,000 rebel mercenaries.
  • Hamilcar's armies capture a number of rebel Libyan cities. The Libyan settlements that have rebelled surrender to Carthage, with the exception of Utica and Hippacritae.
  • Hamilcar and another Carthaginian general, Hannibal, besiege Mathos' mercenary army at Tunis and crucify the captured mercenary leaders in sight of the mercenary battlements.
  • Mathos exploits a weakness in Hannibal's defenses and launches an attack against his army, capturing Hannibal and several other high ranking Carthaginians. The mercenaries then crucify the captured Carthaginian leaders.
  • Carthaginian reinforcements led by Hanno the Great join the battle. They defeat Mathos' mercenary forces and Mathos is captured.
  • The Carthaginian armies besiege and capture Utica and Hippacritae. This ends the Carthaginian civil war.
  • The Romans declare war on the Carthaginians over which state controls Sardinia. However, Carthage defers to Rome rather than enter yet another war and gives up any claim to Sardinia.

Egypt[edit]

Persia[edit]

237 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Carthage[edit]

  • Hamilcar Barca's success in defeating the mercenaries results in a growth in his strength as leader of Carthage's popular party and support for his proposed invasion of the Iberian Peninsula. However, as spokesman for the landed nobility, Hanno opposes the policy of foreign conquest pursued by Hamilcar Barca.
  • Nevertheless, Hamilcar Barca leads a Carthaginian army in an invasion of the Iberian Peninsula with the aim of building a base from which war with Rome can be renewed. By skilful generalship and able diplomacy, Hamilcar extends Carthaginian dominion over many Spanish tribes.

236 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

Egypt[edit]

235 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Roman Republic[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

Greece[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

234 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • The Epirote Alliance is replaced by the Epirote League, which is a federal state with its own parliament (or synedrion).
  • The city of Pleuron is destroyed by Demetrius II.
  • After the resignation of Lydiades, the city of Megalopolis joins the Achaean League.

Roman Republic[edit]

China[edit]

233 BC[edit]

232 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Seleucid Empire[edit]

  • The Seleucid king Seleucus II Callinicus undertakes an expedition into the interior of Iran to try to regain Parthia, but his efforts come to nothing. According to some sources, he is even taken prisoner for several years by the Parthian king, Arsaces I. Other sources mention that he establishes a peace with Arsaces I by recognising his sovereignty over Parthia.

Roman Republic[edit]

  • Despite the opposition of the Roman Senate and of his own father, the Roman political leader Gaius Flaminius Nepos wins the passage of a measure to distribute land among the plebeians. The Romans decide to parcel out land north of Rome (the Ager Gallicus) into small holdings for its poorer citizens whose farms have fallen into ruin during the First Punic War.

By topic[edit]

Philosophy[edit]

  • Following the death of his mentor, Cleanthes of Assos, Chrysippus of Soli succeeds him as the third head of the Stoic school. The many writings of Chrysippus, about the Stoic doctrines, will later earn him the title of Second Founder of Stoicism.

231 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Greece[edit]

  • Demetrius II, king of Macedon, seeks military help from Agron, King of Illyria, a loosely organized state on the Adriatic coast north of Epirus, against the advancing Aetolians. The Illyrian army routs the Aetolians and returns home as victors.

Roman Republic[edit]

230 BC[edit]

By place[edit]

Asia Minor[edit]

  • The city of Pergamum is attacked by the Galatians (Celts who have settled in central Anatolia) because the leader of Pergamum, Attalus I Soter, has refused to pay them the customary tribute. Attalus crushes his enemy in a battle outside the walls of his city and to mark the success he takes the title of king and the name Soter.

Greece[edit]

  • King Agron of Illyria dies. Pinnes, the son of Agron and Agron's first wife Triteuta, officially succeeds his father as king, but the kingdom is effectively ruled by Agron's second wife, Queen Teuta (Tefta), who expels the Greeks from the Illyrian coast and then launches Illyrian pirate ships into the Ionian Sea, preying on Roman shipping. She continues her husband's policy of attacking cities on the west coast of Greece and practising large-scale piracy in the Adriatic and Ionian Seas.

Roman Republic[edit]

  • With Roman merchants being killed by the Illyrian pirates, envoys are sent by Rome to Illyria. After the Roman ambassador lucius Coruncanius and the Issaean ambassador Cleemporus are murdered at sea by Illyrian soldiers after causing offence to Queen Teuta, Roman forces occupy the island of Corcyra with the aim of humbling Teuta.

Egypt[edit]

China[edit]

India[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]