715

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This article is about the year 715. For the number, see 715 (number).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 7th century8th century9th century
Decades: 680s  690s  700s  – 710s –  720s  730s  740s
Years: 712 713 714715716 717 718
715 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
715 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 715
DCCXV
Ab urbe condita 1468
Armenian calendar 164
ԹՎ ՃԿԴ
Assyrian calendar 5465
Bahá'í calendar −1129 – −1128
Bengali calendar 122
Berber calendar 1665
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1259
Burmese calendar 77
Byzantine calendar 6223–6224
Chinese calendar 甲寅(Wood Tiger)
3411 or 3351
    — to —
乙卯年 (Wood Rabbit)
3412 or 3352
Coptic calendar 431–432
Discordian calendar 1881
Ethiopian calendar 707–708
Hebrew calendar 4475–4476
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 771–772
 - Shaka Samvat 637–638
 - Kali Yuga 3816–3817
Holocene calendar 10715
Igbo calendar −285 – −284
Iranian calendar 93–94
Islamic calendar 96–97
Japanese calendar Wadō 8 / Reiki 1
(霊亀元年)
Juche calendar N/A
Julian calendar 715
DCCXV
Korean calendar 3048
Minguo calendar 1197 before ROC
民前1197年
Thai solar calendar 1258
Pope Gregory II (715–731)

Year 715 (DCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 715 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Japan[edit]

  • Empress Genmei abdicates the throne after a 8-year reign in which she has built a replica of the Chinese imperial palace at Japan's new capital, Nara. Genmei is succeeded by her daughter Genshō.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg "Pope St. Gregory II". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 1913. 
  2. ^ Dobie, p. 255
  3. ^ Ehrenfeld, Rachel (2005-12-19). "Islam’s Religious Intolerance". Frontpagemag.com. Retrieved 2012-08-15.