Apopka, Florida

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Apopka, Florida
City
City of Apopka
The Apopka City Hall in April 2007
The Apopka City Hall in April 2007
Flag of Apopka, Florida
Flag
Official seal of Apopka, Florida
Seal
Nickname(s): "Indoor Foliage Capital of the World"
Location in Orange County and the state of Florida
Location in Orange County and the state of Florida
Coordinates: 28°40′34″N 81°30′38″W / 28.67611°N 81.51056°W / 28.67611; -81.51056Coordinates: 28°40′34″N 81°30′38″W / 28.67611°N 81.51056°W / 28.67611; -81.51056
Country  United States of America
State  Florida
Counties Orange
Government
 • Mayor Joe Kilsheimer
 • Vice Mayor, Commissioner Bill Arrowsmith
 • Commissioner Billie Dean
 • Commissioner Diane Velazquez
 • Commissioner Sam Ruth
Area
 • Total 32.6 sq mi (84.4 km2)
 • Land 31.2 sq mi (80.9 km2)
 • Water 1.4 sq mi (3.5 km2)
Elevation 131 ft (40 m)
Population (2013)
 • Total 45,587
 • Density 1,400/sq mi (540/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 32703, 32704, 32712
Area code(s) 407
FIPS code 12-01700
GNIS feature ID 0294327[1]
Website www.Apopka.net

Apopka is a city in Orange County, Florida. The city's population was 41,542 at the 2010 census,[2] up from 26,969 at the 2000 U.S. Census. It is part of the Orlando–Kissimmee–Sanford Metropolitan Statistical Area. Apopka is a Native American word for "Potato eating place".[3] Apopka is often referred to as the "Indoor Foliage Capital of the World".[4]

Geography[edit]

Apopka is located at 28°40′34″N 81°30′38″W / 28.676075°N 81.510618°W / 28.676075; -81.510618.[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 32.6 square miles (84.4 km2). 31.2 square miles (80.9 km2) of it is land and 1.4 square miles (3.5 km2) of it (4.15%) is water.[6]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Apopka, Florida
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 86
(30)
89
(32)
92
(33)
96
(36)
100
(38)
102
(39)
103
(39)
100
(38)
98
(37)
96
(36)
92
(33)
88
(31)
103
(39)
Average high °F (°C) 70
(21)
73
(23)
77
(25)
82
(28)
88
(31)
91
(33)
93
(34)
92
(33)
90
(32)
85
(29)
78
(26)
72
(22)
82.6
(28.1)
Daily mean °F (°C) 60
(16)
62
(17)
67
(19)
71
(22)
77
(25)
82
(28)
84
(29)
83
(28)
82
(28)
76
(24)
69
(21)
62
(17)
72.9
(22.8)
Average low °F (°C) 49
(9)
51
(11)
56
(13)
60
(16)
66
(19)
72
(22)
74
(23)
74
(23)
73
(23)
67
(19)
56
(13)
52
(11)
62.5
(16.8)
Record low °F (°C) 19
(−7)
25
(−4)
27
(−3)
36
(2)
45
(7)
52
(11)
60
(16)
64
(18)
52
(11)
39
(4)
30
(−1)
19
(−7)
19
(−7)
Precipitation inches (mm) 2.86
(72.6)
2.98
(75.7)
3.90
(99.1)
2.48
(63)
3.08
(78.2)
7.28
(184.9)
7.73
(196.3)
8.32
(211.3)
5.64
(143.3)
3.93
(99.8)
2.38
(60.5)
2.58
(65.5)
53.16
(1,350.2)
Source: The Weather Channel[7]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 490
1900 218 −55.5%
1910 410 88.1%
1920 798 94.6%
1930 1,134 42.1%
1940 1,312 15.7%
1950 2,254 71.8%
1960 3,578 58.7%
1970 4,045 13.1%
1980 6,019 48.8%
1990 13,512 124.5%
2000 26,642 97.2%
2010 41,542 55.9%
Est. 2012 44,474 7.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[8]
2012 Estimate[9]

As of the census of 2000, there were 26,642 people, 9,562 households, and 7,171 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,108.1 inhabitants per square mile (427.9/km²). There were 10,091 housing units at an average density of 419.7 per square mile (162.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 73.85% White, 15.56% African American, 0.42% Native American, 1.89% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 5.36% from other races, and 2.83% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.08% of the population.

There were 9,562 households out of which 38.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 14.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.0% were non-families. 18.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.2% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 33.6% from 25 to 44, 19.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $43,651, and the median income for a family was $49,380. Males had a median income of $32,177 versus $26,553 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,189. About 7.1% of families and 9.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.6% of those under age 18 and 9.7% of those age 65 or over.

In 2010 Apopka had a population of 41,542. The racial and ethnic composition of the population was 49.5% White, 20.7% African American, 0.3% Native American, 3.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.4% non-Hispanic reporting some other race, 3.3% reporting two or more races and 25.4% Hispanic or Latino.[10]

History[edit]

The earliest known inhabitants of the Apopka area were the Acuera people, members of the Timucua confederation. They had disappeared by 1730, probably decimated by diseases brought to Florida by Spanish colonists.

The Acuera were succeeded by refugees from Alabama and Georgia, who formed the new Seminole Indian tribe. They called the area Ahapopka. Aha, meaning "Potato," and papka, meaning "eating place".[1] By the 1830s, this settlement numbered about 200, and was the birthplace of the chief Coacoochee (known in English as "Wild Cat").

At the conclusion of the Second Seminole War, the U.S. Congress passed the Armed Occupation Act of 1842, forcing surviving natives at Ahapopka to abandon their village and seek refuge deeper in the wilderness of the Florida peninsula.

The early American settlers built a major trading center on the foundations of the earlier Indian settlement. Their population was large enough by 1857 to support the establishment of a Masonic lodge. In 1859 the lodge erected a permanent meeting place at what is now the intersection of Main Street (U.S. Highway 441) and Alabama Avenue.
This is the 1859 historic building, The Lodge, that became the central point of the 1 mile square formation of the City of Apopka.

The Lodge[edit]

The settlers in the vicinity of "The Lodge" were largely isolated during the Civil War, but the area rebounded once peace was re-established, and a population boom followed the construction of railroad lines through the region.

In 1882 the one square mile surrounding "The Lodge" was officially incorporated under the name "Apopka".

In 1905, the Apopka City Council authorized incorporation of the Apopka Water, Light, and Ice Company. Councilman A.M. Starbird was appointed its manager, but it was not until voters approved a $9,000 bond in 1914 that he was able to contract with International Harvester Corporation to construct a power plant, so electricity was not available in the city until February 10, 1915. This independent utility company was one of many that were gobbled up by the Florida Public Service Corporation in the 1920s. They continued to manage the city's utility needs until the 1940s, when they sold off its ice plants to the Atlantic Company, its electric service to Florida Power Corporation, and its water services to Florida Utilities.

Historic Buildings[edit]

Five buildings in Apopka have been placed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places through the Apopka Historical Society housed in the Museum of the Apopkans.

Year Built Building Name Address Image
1885 Apopka Seaboard Air Line Railway Depot 36 E Station St
Apopka Seaboard Air Line Railway Depot
1886 Waite-Davis House 5 S Central Ave
Waite-Davis House
1887 Mitchell-Tibbetts House 21 E Orange St
Mitchell-Tibbetts House
1924 Ryan & Company Lumber Yard 215 E Fifth St
Ryan & Company Lumber Yard
1932 Carroll Building (Apopka, Florida) 407-409 S Park Ave
Carroll Building

Present-day Apopka[edit]

Apopka is known for having one of the longest-serving mayors in the United States. John H. Land, first elected in 1949, served for 61.25 years (with a short three-year gap), making him the longest serving mayor in Florida and longest serving full-time mayor in the United States through 2014.[11]

This bridge was built by Orange County, FL and the City of Apopka, FL over State Road 441 connecting two sections of the Rails-to-Trails system forming the West Orange Trail for bicyclists and pedestrians. It opened in June 2007.

On April 8, 2014, Apopka City Commissioner Joe Kilsheimer won an election to succeed John H. Land as mayor.[12] Kilsheimer was sworn in on April 22, 2014.[13]


Mayors[edit]

Apopka Mayor
First
Year

Total
Years

Total
Years
Apopka Mayor Multi-Year
Terms
January 1


December 31


Years

Total
Years
J. D. Fudge 1882 3 John Jewell 1926 1930 5
J. J. Combs 1885 1 E. J. Ryan 1931 1934 3
Page McKinney 1886 2 Gillen McClure 1935 1937 3
Horatio Brewer 1888 5 Mark V. Ryan 1938 1940 3
R. C. Waters 1893 2 Leslie P. Waite 1941 1946 6
E. A. Jackson 1895 1 Dr. D. H. Damsel 1947 1949 3
A. J. Lovell 1896 9 * John H. Land 1950 1967 18 *
Joseph D Mitchill 1905 7 * Leonard Hurst 1968 1970 3
A. M. Starbird 1912 1 John H. Land 1971 2014 March 43.25 61.25
A. J. Lovell 1913 1 10 Joe Kilsheimer 2014 April
W. R. McLeod 1914 1
Frank Davis 1915 1
Walter Newell 1916 2 *
T. B. Tower 1918 1
W. P. Newell 1919 1 3
Joseph D Mitchill 1920 3 10
E. B. Morre 1923 3

Development[edit]

Apopka is a fast-growing city and is expanding in all directions. Most notable are the new Lowes and Home Depot DIY stores to the north of the city on US 441 in the location of the previous Dunn Citrus grove (the stretch of 441 which runs through the city is named after Fred N. Dunn). Other businesses on the former Dunn Citrus site include Staples office supply and a second Chili's restaurant.

The John Land Apopka Expressway (Toll 414) opened on May 15, 2009,[14] relieving some of US 441's traffic, taking the route from what is now the US 441 junction with SR 429, and then passing south of the city to rejoin US 441 at its junction with Maitland Boulevard South of the city.

Earthmoving began in the summer of 2010 to further expand the expressway, including an extension of Toll 414, known as Wekiva Parkway, created a junction at US 441 and Plymouth Sorrento Road. Master plans take the Wekiva Parkway extension further north and then east connecting to Interstate 4 at Sanford. The expansion is scheduled to be completed in the next several years. It will then be the shortest route from I-4 to the Disney attractions.

Forbes Magazine named Apopka the "14th Friendliest City in America" in December 2012.[15]

Education[edit]

Notable residents[edit]

Apopka in literature[edit]

Apopka is referenced in Zora Neale Hurston's famous novel, Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Apopka is referenced in Eddie C. Brown's autobiographical book, Beating the Odds: Eddie Brown's Investing and Life Strategies.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Apopka city, Florida". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved September 20, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Seminole Tribe of Florida - Culture, Language". Semtribe.com. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  4. ^ "City of Apopka - Home". Apopka.net. 2006-07-01. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Apopka city, Florida". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved September 20, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Monthly Averages for Apopka, FL". Weather.com. 2013. Retrieved 2013-10-20. 
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved April 21, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved April 21, 2014. 
  10. ^ 2010 population report for Apopka
  11. ^ McKay, Rich (2010-01-01). "Land returned as mayor as election qualifying ends - Orlando Sentinel". Articles.orlandosentinel.com. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  12. ^ First elected in 1949, 93-year-old Apopka mayor loses historic vote
  13. ^ Apopka's new mayor seeks to build around city's 'inner Mayberry'
  14. ^ "Orlando toller completes FL414 Apopka pike - opening ceremony". TOLLROADSnews. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  15. ^ http://www.forbes.com/sites/morganbrennan/2012/12/19/americas-friendliest-towns/

External links[edit]