Associação Portuguesa de Desportos

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This article is about the Brazilian club from São Paulo. For other uses, see Portuguesa (disambiguation).
Portuguesa
Portuguesa logo
Full name Associação Portuguesa de Desportos
Nickname(s) Lusa
Founded August 14, 1920; 94 years ago (1920-08-14)
Stadium Canindé, São Paulo, Brazil
Ground Capacity 21,004
President Ilídio Lico
Head coach Vágner Benazzi (caretaker)
League Campeonato Brasileiro Série B
2014 17th (relegated)
Current season
Palmeiras and Portuguesa in action in the Campeonato Brasileiro 2008 at the Estádio do Pacaembu

Associação Portuguesa de Desportos, usually called Portuguesa or Lusa, is a sports club, and a Brazilian football team from São Paulo in São Paulo state, founded on August 14, 1920 by the Portuguese population of the city. Portuguesa is the fifth most popular team in the city of São Paulo (behind Corinthians, Palmeiras, São Paulo and Santos) and the fourth located within the city proper.

History[edit]

Foundation[edit]

On August 14, 1920 (the same day of the 1385 Battle of Aljubarrota), the five Paulista clubs representing the Portuguese community of São Paulo (Lusíadas Futebol Club, Portugal Marinhense, Associação Cinco de Outubro, Associação Atlética Marquês de Pombal and Esporte Club Lusitano) met at Salão da Câmara Portuguesa de Comércio to merge, and founded Associação Portuguesa de Esportes. They chose the colors of Portugal: green and red. The club merged with Mackenzie College in 1920, and was then renamed Mackenzie-Portuguesa.[1]

The 1940s and the 1950s[edit]

In 1940, the club changed its name to Associação Portuguesa de Desportos, its current name. In 1956, Portuguesa bought from São Paulo a big piece of land located in the limits between the northeast and center of the city. In the land, the Canindé stadium was built, as well as the official headquarters, offices and social club.

2011 Série B[edit]

In the 2011 season Portuguesa participated on the São Paulo State Championship Série A1 (first division) when they were eliminated in the Quarterfinals by São Paulo, in the Campeonato Brasileiro Série B (second division) and in the Copa do Brasil (Brazilian Cup), when they were eliminated in the First Round by Bangu.

After a comeback victory against Americana, on October 22, 2011, the club achieved promotion to Campeonato Brasileiro Série A 2012.[2] On November 8, 2011, after a 2-2 draw against Sport Recife, the club won the 2011 Série B, the first national title won by the club. The title crowned a strong campaign by the Lusa side, with 23 Wins, 12 Draws and only 3 losses. The offensive and fast-paced style of play implemented by the team's coach, Jorginho, and the great amount of 82 goals scored led to the nickname of "Barcelusa", referring to FC Barcelona's style of playing.[3] Lusa ended the 2011 Season with a 2-0 win over Icasa, finishing 21 straight games undefeated.

2012: Awful start, relegation and Nelson Dida[edit]

In 2012, the "Barcelusa" squad struggled in the Campeonato Paulista following the losses of players Marco Antonio and Edno, which led to the relegation to the Campeonato Paulista Série A2 [4] after a 4-2 loss to Mirassol and combined results on other games. The chairman disappointment with the awful campaign in a much considered easy tournament led to the dismissal of the team's coach, Jorginho, after 14 months working for the Lusa side.[5]

The team then turned sights on Geninho, and confirmed the former Brazilian champion as their new manager.[6] The team mounted a good campaign in the Copa do Brasil, but fell through at the Round of 16 after a 2-0 defeat to Bahia.

Lusa started the Campeonato Brasileiro Série A with their goalkeeper Wéverton Pereira da Silva negotiating with his departure to play for Atlético Paranaense. Without a good replacement at the Youth Squad nor the recently added Glédson, Lusa then started negotiating with the two-time UEFA Champions League champion and former AC Milan goalkeeper Dida, and signed the 38-year old keeper to wear their colors until the end of the "Brasileirão" tournament.[7] The keeper started for the first time for Lusa in a match against São Paulo, and had a good showing in a 1-0 win for the Lusa side.[8] Lusa then played against Neymar's Santos, again at home, and with amazing saves by the veteran goalkeeper and losing several clear scoring chances at the first half, the game ended 0-0,[9] with Lusa mounting two wins, three losses and two draws starting the tournament.

Lusa then pulled off a trade with Clube Atlético Paranaense, bringing aboard striker Bruno Mineiro. The negotiation proved to be extremely positive, since the new number 9 started scoring goals at will: in 12 games, he scored 11 times, becoming one of the top scorers in the league, pursuing closely the likes of Vagner Love, Fred and Luís Fabiano.

After twenty-seven games in the Brasileirão, Lusa survived a series of difficult games to maintain its spot out of the relegation zone. Playing against Sociedade Esportiva Palmeiras and Coritiba Football Club, Lusa won both games by three goals to none at home. Playing Fluminense, São Paulo, Santos and Atlético Mineiro, Lusa lost the first two games, but benefited from the absence of superstar Neymar to beat Santos away by 3-1 [10] and then allowed Atlético Mineiro to escape out of Canindé with a draw.[11] Despite having Brazilian international and former Ballon d'Or winner Ronaldinho, the Atlético side struggled to get out of the strong midfield pressure and ball possession imposed by Lusa, which had played the majority of the second half with a one man advantage after defender Leonardo Silva was sent off.

Playing against Sport Club do Recife, Bruno Mineiro scored a hat-trick in a turnaround win by 5-1,[12] becoming the new league scoring leader, trespassing Fred. Fred and BM9 are close friends, having played with Fluminense's striker at the youth level in América Mineiro.[13]

2013: Promotion back to A1[edit]

In December 2012, Péricles Chamusca was announced as the new manager, with a one-year contract.[14] He was fired in April 2013.[15] A day after Chamusca's dimissal, the club announced a Colonel, Edson Pimenta, as new coach.[16]

On April 16, 2013, Portuguesa was eliminated by Naviraiense (the same club which suffered in 2010 a 10-0 routing by Santos) in 2013 Copa do Brasil's first round.[17] Only nine days later, Lusa won promotion to Campeonato Paulista Série A1, after a 2-1 victory against Capivariano.[18]

Honours[edit]

1996
2011
1935, 1936, 1973
2007, 2013
1952, 1955
1991, 2002
1999-00
1998, 2000

Rivals[edit]

Sport Club Corinthians Paulista, Sociedade Esportiva Palmeiras, São Paulo Futebol Clube, Associação Atlética Ponte Preta, Santos Futebol Clube, Guarani Futebol Clube and Clube Atlético Juventus.

Stadium[edit]

Main article: Estádio do Canindé

Portuguesa's stadium is the Estádio do Canindé, built in 1956, with a maximum capacity of 27,500. Following current FIFA safety rules the maximum capacity is 25,470 people.[19]

Logo history[edit]

1923-2005 logo

The club's first logo, introduced on August 14, 1920 during the club's foundation, was a Portuguese shield. This logo was chosen to honor Portugal.

The club's second logo, introduced in 1923, had a Cross of Avis bordered by a red outline. The Cross of Avis represents Portuguese independence from the Kingdom of Castille, which happened after the Battle of Aljubarrota on August 14, 1385.

In 2005, the club's logo design was modernized, and golden trim was added around the red outline.

Team colors[edit]

Portuguesa's first kit, introduced on September 20, 1920, was an all-red shirt, white shorts, and red socks with two horizontal green lines. The goalkeeper kit was completely white.

On March 26, 1923, the club's kit was changed to red and green vertically striped shirts.

The team kit was later changed again, with the red and green stripes changed to horizontal ones, and the away kit became an all-white shirt, red shorts and red socks.

Mascots[edit]

Portuguesa's first mascot was a Portuguese girl named Severa. She was named after the 1930s fado singer Dima Tereza who was nicknamed A Severa, after the Portuguese fado singer Maria Severa Onofriana.

In 1994, Portuguesa changed its mascot. The club's unique original mascot was replaced by a lion wearing the club's home kit. The lion is one of the most common Brazilian football club's mascots.

Anthems[edit]

There are two club's anthems. The first anthem, called Hino Rubro-verde (Portuguese for Red and Green Anthem) is the old one, and was composed by Archimedes Messina and Carlos Leite Guerra.

The second anthem, called Campeões (Portuguese for Champions) is the current club's anthem, and was composed by Roberto Leal and Márcia Lúcia.

Current squad[edit]

First-team squad[edit]

As of September 5, 2014[20]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Position Player
Brazil GK Glédson
Brazil GK Rafael Santos
Brazil GK Douglas
Brazil GK Tom
Brazil DF André Astorga
Brazil DF Diego Augusto
Brazil DF Gustavo Tabalipa
Brazil DF Brinner (on loan from Botafogo)
Brazil DF Cassius
Brazil DF Luciano Castán
Colombia DF Rafael Pérez
Brazil DF Arnaldo
Brazil DF Jussandro
Brazil DF Alê
Brazil DF Régis
Brazil MF Rudnei
Brazil MF Renan
Brazil MF Diego Silva (on loan from XV Piracicaba)
Brazil MF Diogo Orlando
Uruguay MF Bruno Piñatares
No. Position Player
Brazil MF Jocinei (on loan from Corinthians)
Brazil MF Gabriel Modesto
Brazil MF Allan Dias
Brazil MF Fran
Brazil MF Gabriel Xavier
Brazil MF Jean Mota
Brazil MF Maycon
Brazil MF Daniel Bacan
Brazil MF Dinélson
Brazil MF Djalma
Brazil MF Júnior Alves
Brazil MF Léo Costa
Uruguay FW Bryan Aldave
Brazil FW Pedro Oldoni
Brazil FW Caio (on loan from Palmeiras)
Brazil FW Serginho
Brazil FW Marcelinho
Brazil FW Alemão (on loan from Ponte Preta)
Brazil FW Luan

Managers[edit]

Notable players[edit]

see also Category:Associação Portuguesa de Desportos players

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Associação Portuguesa de Desportos" (in Portuguese). RSSSF Brasil. July 7, 2009. Retrieved January 16, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Portuguesa vira sobre o Americana, é ajudada por revés do Sport e sela acesso" [Portuguesa completes the comeback against Americana, is helped by Sport defeat and achieves promotion]. UOL (in Portuguese). October 22, 2011. Retrieved October 23, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Barça, espejo del 'Barcelusa'" [Barça, mirror of 'Barcelusa']. MARCA (in Spanish). November 11, 2011. Retrieved December 5, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Portuguesa: de 'Barcelusa' ao rebaixamento no Estadual" [Portuguesa: from 'Barcelusa' to relegation]. LANCE! (in Portuguese). April 15, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  5. ^ "Jorginho volta atrás e pede demissão da Portuguesa" [Jorginho takes step back and is out of Portuguesa]. Terra (in Portuguese). April 20, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  6. ^ "Portuguesa anuncia Geninho como substituto de Jorginho" [Portuguesa announces Geninho as Jorginho's substitute]. Terra (in Portuguese). April 20, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  7. ^ "Portuguesa anuncia acordo com Dida e tira goleiro da aposentadoria" [Portuguesa inks Dida and lure goalkeeper out of retirement]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). May 24, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  8. ^ "Na estréia de Dida, Lusa vence no Canindé e aumenta crise no Tricolor" [In Dida's first start, Lusa wins at home and raises worries on Tricolor]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). June 26, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Portuguesa encurrala o Santos, mas clássico no Canindé termina zerado" [Portuguesa harasses Santos, but the rivalry game at Canindé ends scoreless]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). July 1, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Os gols de Portuguesa 3 x 1 Santos pelo Campeonato Brasileiro" [The recap of Portuguesa 3 x 1 Santos]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). September 22, 2012. Retrieved October 3, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Portuguesa e Atlético não atingem objetivos e ficam no empate no Canindé" [Portuguesa and Atlético can't accomplish missions and end up with a draw]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). September 29, 2012. Retrieved October 3, 2012. 
  12. ^ "Bruno Mineiro faz três, vira artilheiro, e Lusa goleia o desesperado Sport" [Bruno Mineiro scores three, becomes the new scoring leader and Lusa thrashes the desperate Sport]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). October 4, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Ídolo da Lusa, Bruno Mineiro recorda momentos ao lado do 'parceiro' Fred" [Lusa's idol, Bruno Mineiro reminisces moments with partner Fred]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). September 21, 2012. Retrieved April 9, 2013. 
  14. ^ "Péricles Chamusca é o novo técnico da Portuguesa" [Péricles Chamusca is new Portuguesa's manager] (in Portuguese). Lance. December 13, 2012. Retrieved April 26, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Demitido, Chamusca usa números para provar bom trabalho na Lusa" [Fired, Chamusca use numbers to prove good work in Lusa] (in Portuguese). Globo Esporte. April 15, 2013. Retrieved April 26, 2013. 
  16. ^ "Portuguesa efetiva Coronel como técnico até o fim da Série A2" [Portuguesa hire Colonel as coach until Série A2's end] (in Portuguese). Globo Esporte. April 16, 2013. Retrieved April 26, 2013. 
  17. ^ "'Rumo a Tóquio 2025', Naviraiense surpreende e elimina a Portuguesa" ['Towards Tokyo 2025', Naviraiense raises eyebrows and eliminates Portuguesa]. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). April 16, 2013. Retrieved April 26, 2013. 
  18. ^ "Jogadores da Lusa festejam acesso: ‘Missão dada é missão cumprida’" [Lusa's players celebrate promotion: 'Mission given is accomplished mission']. Globo Esporte (in Portuguese). April 25, 2013. Retrieved April 26, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Portuguesa" (in Portuguese). Pelé.net. Retrieved December 1, 2008. 
  20. ^ Elenco; Portuguesa (Portuguese)
  • Lusa, uma História de Amor - Orlando Duarte, Livraria Teixeira, 2000.

External links[edit]