Australian Senate special election in Western Australia, 2014

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

A half-Senate election for the election of six Senators occurred in Western Australia on 5 April 2014.[1] Preferences were distributed on 29 April 2014.[2][3]

The election was called after the result of the 2013 Australian federal election for the seats was voided by the High Court of Australia, sitting as the Court of Disputed Returns, on 20 February 2014. The election came about as a result of 1,375 ballot papers being lost during an official recount in November 2013. The High Court ruled that because the number of lost ballots far exceeded the margin for the two remaining Senate seats, the only acceptable remedy was to throw out the results and hold a fresh election. This decision set in motion the process of an special election.[4][5]

The election is unprecedented in Australian federal politics. An election was held in South Australia in 1907 for the election of one senator under a previous electoral system. Half-Senate elections without a corresponding Australian House of Representatives election have occurred several times due to effluxion of time, the last one having been held in 1970.

The date was set by Governor-General Sir Peter Cosgrove on the advice of Prime Minister Tony Abbott. However, the onus for setting times and processes fell on the Governor of Western Australia, Malcolm McCusker, on the advice of Premier Colin Barnett, in McCusker's obligations under the operation of the Election of Senators Act 1903 (WA).

Result[edit]

Senate (STV GV) — Turnout 88.50% (CV) — Informal 2.50%[6][7]
Party Votes  % Swing Seats won Total seats Change
  Liberal Party of Australia 435,220 34.06 –5.14 3 6 0
  Australian Labor Party 275,094 21.53 –5.06 1 3 –1
  Australian Greens 199,358 15.60 +6.11 1 2 0
  Palmer United Party 157,740 12.34 +7.33 1 1 +1
  Nationals WA 38,818 3.04 –2.03 0 0 0
  Other 171,574 13.43 –1.21 0 0 0
  Total 1,277,804 6 12
# Senator Party
1 David Johnston   Liberal
2 Joe Bullock   Labor
3 Scott Ludlam   Greens
4 Michaelia Cash   Liberal
5 Zhenya Wang   Palmer
6 Linda Reynolds   Liberal

The sixth and last seat was a close contest between third Liberal candidate Linda Reynolds and second Labor candidate Louise Pratt.[8] Reynolds was ahead in the ABC's detailed count projection,[7] with Antony Green predicting on 10 April "It is clear the Liberals will win the last seat".[9] The result was confirmed by the Electoral Commission on 29 April.[2][3] The score at the final count was 188,169 to Reynolds versus 176,042 for Pratt, a margin of 12,127. The projected margin on Green's calculator, which treats all votes as above-the-line, was a narrower 8,109.[10]

Candidates[edit]

There were a number of candidate changes from the original election. Notable changes included:

  • Shane Hill replaced Peter Foster as third candidate on the Labor ticket
  • David Wirrpanda was no longer on the Nationals ticket
  • Des Headland assumed second place on the Palmer United ticket
  • Anthony Fels switched from lead Katter's Australian Party candidate to lead Mutual Party candidate
  • Fiona Patten, who was the lead Sex Party candidate in Victoria in 2013, became their lead candidate at the special election

The Socialist Equality Party and Australian Independents contested the 2013 election in Western Australia, but did not contest the special election. The Socialist Alliance, Pirate Party, Voluntary Euthanasia Party, Building Australia Party, Mutual Party, Republican Party and Democratic Labor Party did not contest the 2013 election in WA, but decided to contest the special election.

Sitting members are shown in bold text. Tickets that elected at least one member in 2014 are highlighted in the relevant colour and successful candidates are indicated with an asterisk (*). Candidates marked with ‡ were declared elected after the final count in 2013.

Labor candidates Liberal candidates Greens candidates Palmer candidates Nationals candidates Katter candidates
 
  1. Joe Bullock‡*
  2. Louise Pratt
  3. Shane Hill
  4. Klara Andric
  1. David Johnston‡*
  2. Michaelia Cash‡*
  3. Linda Reynolds‡*
  4. Slade Brockman
  1. Scott Ludlam‡*
  2. Christine Cunningham
  3. Ian James
  4. Jordon Steele-John
  5. Sarah Nielsen-Harvey
  6. Judith Cullity
  1. Zhenya Wang*
  2. Des Headland
  3. Chamonix Terblanche
  1. Shane Van Styn
  2. Colin de Grussa
  1. Phillip Bouwman
  2. Susan Hoddinott
Shooters & Fishers candidates Australian Christians candidates Family First candidates Australian Sex Party candidates Wikileaks candidates Liberal Democrats candidates
 
  1. Murray Bow
  2. John Parkes
  1. Ray Moran
  2. Justin Moseley
  1. Linda Rose
  2. Henry Heng
  1. Fiona Patten
  2. Mark Coleman
  1. Tibor Meszaros
  2. Lucy Nicol
  1. Jim Fryar
  2. Neil Hamilton
Democrats candidates Smokers' Rights candidates HEMP candidates Socialist Alliance candidates Voice candidates Fishing & Lifestyle candidates
 
  1. Chris Fernandez
  2. William Thiel
  1. Max Katz-Barber
  2. Daniel Di Rado
  1. James Moylan
  2. Tayla Moylan
  1. Alex Bainbridge
  2. Chris Jenkins
  1. Brian Parkes
  2. Sean Butler
  1. Daniel McCarthy
  2. Suzzanne Wyatt
Secular candidates Pirate candidates Freedom & Prosperity candidates Sustainable Population candidates Outdoor Recreation candidates Animal Justice candidates
 
  1. Simon Cuthbert
  2. Andrew Thompson
  1. Fletcher Boyd
  2. Michelle Allen
  1. Bill Koutalianos
  2. Leon Ashby
  1. Peter Strachan
  2. William Bourke
  1. David Fishlock
  2. Joaquim De Lima
  1. Katrina Love
  2. Alicia Sutton
Motoring Enthusiast candidates Sports candidates Rise Up Australia candidates Voluntary Euthanasia candidates Building Australia candidates Mutual candidates
 
  1. Richie Howlett
  2. Rob Zandvliet
  1. Wayne Dropulich
  2. Al Lackovic
  1. Jane Foreman
  2. Joanne Bennett
  1. Philip Nitschke
  2. Jim Duffield
  1. Ken Bezant
  2. Daniel Smee
  1. Anthony Fels
  2. Felly Chandra
Republican candidates DLP candidates Group C candidates Ungrouped candidates
 
  1. Marcus Anderson
  2. Rohan Hollick
  1. Adrian Good
  2. Cathy Kiernan
  1. Russell Woolf
  2. Verity James

Teresa Van Lieshout (Ind)
Kim Mubarak (Ind)

Electoral events timeline[edit]

  • 7 September 2013 (Election Day) – The Liberal-National Coalition defeats the Australian Labor Party.
  • 17 October – A recount of all "above-the-line" Senate votes made in Western Australia is initiated after an appeal by the WA Greens and the Australian Sports Party is upheld.[11]
  • 31 October 2013 – The AEC announces that it is unable to find 1,375 ballot papers during the WA Senate recount.[12]
  • 4 November 2013 – The AEC declares the result of the WA Senate recount, awarding the last two seats to the Greens and Australian Sports Party, instead of the ALP and Palmer United Party.[13]
  • 15 November 2013 – The AEC, Palmer United candidate Wang, and voter Simon Mead lodge a petition with the High Court of Australia in its capacity as the Court of Disputed Returns, asking that the WA Senate result be declared null and void.[14]
  • January 2014 – Justice Kenneth Hayne, in the Court of Disputed Returns, hears submissions from the AEC and political parties.[15] On 30 January 2014, Hayne reserved his decision.[16]
  • 20 February 2014 – The Court of Disputed Returns voids the results of the WA Senate election.[17] Hayne ruled that the margins between Palmer United and the Australian Sports Party for the fifth seat and the Greens and ALP for the sixth seat were far exceeded by the number of missing ballots. Hayne ruled that since the voters who cast those missing ballots had effectively been "prevented from voting", no remedy short of a new election was appropriate.[4][5]
  • 21 February 2014 – Electoral Commissioner Ed Killesteyn announces his resignation, which will take effect on 4 July 2014.[18]
  • 28 February 2014 – McCusker announced the election date as Saturday 5 April 2014 [19]
  • 13 March 2014 – closing date for nomination of candidates.
  • 5 April 2014 – election day.

2013 Senate result background[edit]

The Senate has 76 seats. Forty seats were up for election; six in each of the six states, two for the ACT and two for the Northern Territory. The terms of the four senators from the territories commenced on election day; all other terms take effect on 1 July 2014.[20][21]

Distribution of preferences have occurred for all Senate seats in all states and territories.[22][23] The Senate will see the Coalition government on 33 seats with the Labor opposition on 25 seats and a record crossbench of 18 – the Greens on ten seats, Palmer United on two seats, with other minor parties and independents on six seats – the LDP's David Leyonhjelm, Family First's Bob Day, Motoring's Ricky Muir, Sports Party's Wayne Dropulich and incumbents Nick Xenophon and the DLP's John Madigan. Muir will vote in line with Palmer United.[24] The Coalition government will require the support of at least six non-coalition Senators to pass legislation.

Most Senate votes cast in Western Australia were subject to a formal recount.[25] During the recount it was determined that 1,375 WA Senate ballot papers could not be located.[26][27] After the final recount the result was duly declared which changed the last two predicted WA Senate spots from Palmer and Labor back to Sports Party and Greens. Mick Keelty, a former AFP Commissioner, was requested by the AEC to investigate the issue of the misplaced ballot papers.[28][29] On 15 November, the AEC petitioned the High Court, acting as the Court of Disputed Returns, to seek an order from the court that the WA Senate election of all six senators (3 Liberal, 1 Labor, 1 Green, 1 Sports Party) be declared void.[30][31][32]

Given the closeness of the margins that favoured the final two declared candidates, the petition is based on the premise that the inability to include 1,370 missing ballot papers in the recount of the WA Senate election means that the election was likely to be affected for the purposes of s 362(3) of the Commonwealth Electoral Act 1918.

— Australian Electoral Commission, 15 November 2013

A record number of candidates stood at the election.[33] Group voting tickets came under scrutiny because multiple candidates were provisionally elected with the vast majority of their 14.3 percent quotas coming from the preferences of other parties across the political spectrum. "Preference whisperer" Glenn Druery organised tight cross-preferencing between many minor parties.[34][35][36] The Sports Party's Wayne Dropulich won a Senate seat on a record-low primary vote of 0.2 percent in Western Australia, his party placing coming 21st out of 28 groups on primary votes.[37][38][39] The result caused discussion across a range of organisations and parties about whether there should be changes to the GVT system.[40][41][42]

2013 nationwide Senate result[edit]

Senate (STV GV) — Turnout 93.88% (CV) — Informal 2.96%[43][44]
Party Votes  % Swing Seats won Total seats Change
  Liberal/National Coalition 5,057,218 37.70 –0.59 17 33 –1
  Australian Labor Party 4,038,591 30.11 –5.02 12 25 –6
  Australian Greens 1,159,588 8.65 –4.46 4 10 +1
  Palmer United Party 658,976 4.91 +4.91 2 2 +2
  Liberal Democratic Party 523,831 3.91 +2.10 1 1 +1
  Xenophon Group 258,376 1.93 +1.93 1 1 0
  Family First Party 149,306 1.11 –0.99 1 1 +1
  Democratic Labour Party 112,549 0.84 –0.22 0 1 0
  Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party 67,560 0.50 +0.50 1 1 +1
  Australian Sports Party 2,997 0.02 +0.02 1 1 +1
  Other 1,384,027 10.32 +1.82 0 0 0
  Total 13,413,019     40 76

2013 WA Senate result[edit]

Party Votes  % Swing Seats won Total seats Change
  Liberal 513,639 39.20 −3.79 3 6 0
Labor 348,401 26.59 −3.11 1 3 −1
Greens 124,354 9.49 −4.47 1 2 0
Nationals WA 66,421 5.07 +1.64 0 0 0
Palmer United Party 65,595 5.01 +5.01 0 0 0
Liberal Democrats 44,902 3.43 +2.25 0 0 0
Australian Christians 21,499 1.64 +1.64 0 0 0
  Sex Party 19,519 1.49 −0.76 0 0 0
HEMP 13,973 1.07 +1.07 0 0 0
Shooters and Fishers 13,622 1.04 +0.44 0 0 0
Wikileaks 9,767 0.75 +0.75 0 0 0
Animal Justice 9,720 0.74 +0.74 0 0 0
Family First 8,783 0.67 −0.48 0 0 0
Smokers Rights 8,719 0.67 +0.67 0 0 0
Motoring Enthusiasts 7,748 0.59 +0.59 0 0 0
Fishing and Lifestyle 5,729 0.44 +0.44 0 0 0
Aust. Independents 4,041 0.31 +0.31 0 0 0
Katter's Australian 3,909 0.30 +0.30 0 0 0
Rise Up Australia 3,861 0.29 +0.29 0 0 0
Democrats 3,841 0.29 −0.09 0 0 0
Sports Party 2,997 0.23 +0.23 1 1 +1
Outdoor Recreation 2,215 0.17 +0.17 0 0 0
Secular 1,486 0.11 +0.03 0 0 0
Climate Sceptics 1,481 0.11 −0.05 0 0 0
Stable Population 1,352 0.10 +0.10 0 0 0
Socialist Equality 1,143 0.09 +0.09 0 0 0
Australian Voice 1,139 0.09 +0.09 0 0 0
Independent 422 0.03 +0.03 0 0 0
Total formal votes 1,310,278 97.14 +0.32 6 12
Informal votes 38,519 2.86 −0.32
Turnout 1,348,797 92.77 −0.78
Elected # Senator Party
2013 1 David Johnston   Liberal
2013 2 Joe Bullock   Labor
2013 3 Michaelia Cash   Liberal
2013 4 Linda Reynolds   Liberal
2013 5 Wayne Dropulich   Sports
2013 6 Scott Ludlam   Greens
2010
2010 1 Mathias Cormann   Liberal
2010 2 Chris Evans   Labor
2010 3 Chris Back   Liberal
2010 4 Glenn Sterle   Labor
2010 5 Judith Adams   Liberal
2010 6 Rachel Siewert   Greens

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "WA Senate election to be held on April 5". Yahoo! News. 28 February 2014. 
  2. ^ a b Liberals secure three seats in WA Senate re-run: SMH 29 April 2014
  3. ^ a b 2014 WA Senate election final distribution of preferences: AEC
  4. ^ a b "Fresh WA poll throws Canberra into spin". SBS Online. AAP. 20 February 2014. Retrieved 22 February 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Australian Electoral Commission v Johnston [2014] HCA 5 (18 February 2014), H.C.
  6. ^ 2014 WA Senate results: Antony Green ABC
  7. ^ a b Detailed 2014 WA Senate result: Antony Green ABC
  8. ^ WA Senate election: Government hopeful of favourable Upper House as Palmer United Party picks up seat: ABC 6 April 2014
  9. ^ Tracking the WA Senate Re-election Count: Antony Green ABC
  10. ^ WA Senate election finalised: Poll Bludger
  11. ^ Hopkin, Michael (17 October 2013). "WA Senate recount gets under way". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 28 October 2013. 
  12. ^ Packham, Ben (31 October 2013). "Probe launched into lost WA Senate ballot papers". The Australian. Retrieved 31 October 2013. "serious administrative issue came to light" during the recount 
  13. ^ Griffiths, Emma (4 November 2013). "AEC confirms WA Senate election result, apologises over 1,375 lost ballots". abc.net.au. Retrieved 5 November 2013. 
  14. ^ Ireland, Judith (15 November 2013). "Missing votes: AEC asks High Court to void WA Senate election". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 18 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Court hears submissions to void WA Senate election after votes lost". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 29 January 2014. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  16. ^ "High Court judge reserves judgment on botched West Australian Senate election". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 30 January 2014. Retrieved 30 January 2014. 
  17. ^ "Court of Disputed Returns voids 2013 WA Senate election result". Australian Electoral Commission. Retrieved 24 February 2014. 
  18. ^ Bourke, Latika (2014). "Ed Killesteyn resigns as Australian Electoral Commissioner". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2014-02-23. 
  19. ^ http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-02-28/wa-has-new-senate-election-date/5291198?section=wa
  20. ^ Commonwealth of Australia Constitution Act, Section 13. Retrieved 6 September 2010.
  21. ^ Senate (Representation of Territories) Act 1973, Section 6. Retrieved August 2010.
  22. ^ AEC Twitter feed
  23. ^ "Senate results: Distribution of Preferences". Virtual Tally Room: Election 2013. AEC. 1 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  24. ^ "Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party Consolidates Support" (Press release). Australian Motoring Enthusiast Party. 10 October 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  25. ^ Most recently updated divisions, Senate: 2013 election, AEC
  26. ^ Harrison, Dan; Hurst, Daniel; Ireland, Judith (31 October 2013). "WA Senate recount in turmoil as 1375 votes go missing". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  27. ^ "Australian Electoral Commission statement: WA Senate recount" (Press release). =AEC. 31 October 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  28. ^ Green, Antony (3 November 2013). "What's Going On With The WA Senate Count". ABC News. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  29. ^ Green, Antony (8 November 2013). "WA Senate Contest Comes Down to Just 1 Vote – and it's one of the Missing". ABC News. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  30. ^ Murphy, Katherine (15 November 2013). "Senate recount: electoral commission asks high court to nullify six WA seats". The Guardian (Australia). Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  31. ^ Ireland, Judith (15 November 2013). "Missing votes: AEC asks High Court to void WA Senate election". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  32. ^ "Electoral Commission challenges WA Senate result to bring about fresh election". ABC News. 15 November 2013. Retrieved 15 November 2013. 
  33. ^ Green, Antony (16 August 2013). "Record Number of Candidates to Contest 2013 Election". ABC News. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  34. ^ "Bitter dispute erupts over Senate preferences in Queensland". ABC News. 5 September 2013. 
  35. ^ Druery, Glenn (21 August 2013). "The 'preference whisperer'". ABC News. 
  36. ^ Jabour, Bridie (13 September 2013). "'Preference whisperer' defends role in minor parties' Senate success". The Guardian (Australia). 
  37. ^ "Western Australia 2013 Senate results and preference flows". ABC News. 
  38. ^ Green, Antony (13 September 2013). "The Preference Deals behind the Strange Election of Ricky Muir and Wayne Dropulich". ABC News. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  39. ^ "Australian Sports Party 'pleasantly surprised' by potential Senate seat". ABC News. 9 September 2013. 
  40. ^ "Coalition shy of Senate majority". Business Spectator. 9 September 2013. 
  41. ^ "Tony Abbott fires a warning shot at micro parties in the Senate". WA Today. 9 September 2013. 
  42. ^ "Xenophon wants voting reform". NineMSN. 9 September 2013. 
  43. ^ "First Preferences by Group". Virtual Tally Room: 2013 election. AEC. 1 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  44. ^ "Senate Results: Summary". ABC. 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013.