C minor

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This article is about the C minor scale. For the chord C minor, see minor chord.
C minor
Relative key E major
Parallel key C major
Dominant key G major / G minor
Subdominant F minor
Component pitches
C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C
Ascending and descending C natural minor scale.
C minor melodic scale About this sound listen }
C harmonic minor scale ascending and descending. About this sound Play 

C minor (abbreviated c or Cm) is a minor scale based on C, consisting of the pitches C, D, E, F, G, A, and B. The harmonic minor raises the B to B. Changes needed for the melodic and harmonic versions of the scale are written in with naturals and accidentals as necessary.

Its key signature consists of three flats. Its relative major is E-flat major, and its parallel major is C major.

Usage[edit]

In the Baroque period, music in C minor was usually written with a two-flat key signature, and some modern editions of that repertoire retain that convention.

Of the two piano concertos that Mozart wrote in a minor key, one of them (No. 24, K. 491) is in C minor.

C minor has been associated with heroic struggle since Beethoven's time.[citation needed] Beethoven wrote some of his most characteristic works in the key of C minor, including the Symphony No. 5 and no fewer than three piano sonatas. (See Beethoven and C minor.)

Brahms's first symphony and first string quartet were composed in C minor; these were both genres with which Beethoven was closely associated during Brahms's lifetime.

Three of Anton Bruckner's ten numbered symphonies are in C minor, as are two of Dmitri Shostakovich's symphonies.

Notable compositions[edit]

External links[edit]

Media related to C minor at Wikimedia Commons