Christianity in Djibouti

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Christianity is the religion of 6% (~ 25,000) of the population of Djibouti (923,000 - July 2012 est.).Christians are mostly of Ethiopian and European ancestry. Most Christians are Ethiopian Orthodox or Roman Catholic. The constitution of Djibouti includes freedom of religion, although Islam is the state religion. There are likely no current prisoners for Christian religious reasons. There is a tolerant attitude between religions in general. Proselytizing of Muslims is not allowed. Converts from Islam to Christianity have to fear persecution. Less than 2% of the Djiboutians are Christians, but many of the Ethiopians in Djibouti are Christians.

Christian denominations[edit]

3.2% of the population are Orthodox. 0.07% to 1% of the population (about 4,767 persons) are Protestants. According to the World Christian Encyclopedia among other denominations are the Eglise Protestante de Djibouti, the Greek Orthodox Church and the Red Sea Mission Team.[1] The Mennonite Mission is active in Djibouti. The Eglise Protestante Evangelique de Djibouti (known in English as the Protestant Church of Djibouti) was founded in 1960. It is active in the care for refugees, among other things.[2] There is a Djibouti Parish of the New Apostolic Church.[3]

Djibouti is included in the Episcopal Area of the Horn of Africa of the Anglican Diocese of Egypt, though there are no current congregations in the country.[4]

Roman Catholicism[edit]

There are around 7,000 Catholics in Djibouti.[5] The only Roman Catholic diocese is the Diocese of Djibouti, divided in 5 parishes. Just over 1% to 2% of the population are members of the diocese. Djibouti maintains diplomatic relations with the Vatican.

See also[edit]

References and notes[edit]

External links[edit]