Cockle bread

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Cockle bread
Place of origin
England
Cookbook:Cockle bread  Cockle bread

Cockle bread was a bread baked by English women in the seventeenth century which was supposed to act as a love charm or aphrodisiac. The dough was kneaded and pressed against the woman's vulva and then baked. This bread was then given to the object of the baker's affections.[1]

Seventeenth-century English practice[edit]

John Aubrey wrote of it: Young wenches have a wanton sport which they call 'moulding of cocklebread' - they get upon a table-board, and then gather up their knees

Nursery rhyme[edit]

In the 19th and 20th centuries, Cockle-Bread was a children's game in which one squats on his/her haunches with hands clasped beneath the thighs, while others grasp his/her arms and swing him/her to and fro. This action was often accompanied by a rhyme:

My granny is sick and now is dead
And we'll go mould some cocklety bread
Up with the heels and down with the head
And that's the way to make cocklety bread.

References[edit]