Coky Giedroyc

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Coky Giedroyć
Occupation Film and television director
Years active 1988–present

Mary-Rose Helen "Coky" Giedroyć, Lady Bower-Smyth (/ˈkki ˈɡɛdrɔɪ/; born 1962 in Hong Kong) is a BAFTA-nominated English director.

Career[edit]

Giedroyc has directed several films, including Women Talking Dirty and Stella Does Tricks; she is best known for her work directing television dramas, which have included Wuthering Heights, The Virgin Queen, Oliver Twist, Fear of Fanny, Carrie's War, and three episodes of Blackpool.

In 2007 she was nominated, with Paula Milne and Paul Rutman, for a Best Drama Serial BAFTA for The Virgin Queen.

In 2010, her directing work for the BBC TV serial, entitled The Nativity, was praised by critics, although the story portrayed some controversial elements that caused debate between Christians due to its modern dramatizations of the birth of Christ.

Giedroyc directed A Study in Pink, originally filmed as a 60-minute pilot for the TV series, Sherlock and written by Steven Moffat. However, the BBC decided not to broadcast the episode because they wished to change the broadcast length to 90 mins. However the pilot was released on the DVD of the first series, and it proved to be slightly different from the final version.

She has also directed BBC's The Hour and What Remains.[1]

Personal life[edit]

The elder sister of actress, presenter and writer Mel Giedroyc, she grew up in Leatherhead, Surrey. Her father is Michał Giedroyć, a historian of Polish-Lithuanian descent from an ancient ducal family who came to England in 1947. She attended Bristol University, where she first began making films.[2] Married to Sir Thomas Weyland Bowyer-Smyth, a baronet, Giedroyc's title is Lady Bowyer-Smyth.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A new thrilling four-part whodunit written by Tony Basgallop for BBC One". BBC. 14 August 2013. Retrieved 27 August 2013. 
  2. ^ Jacqueline Downs "Coky Giedroyc" in Yorasm Allon (ed), et al Contemporary British & Irish Directors, London: Wallflower Press, 2001, p.111

External links[edit]