Cork City (UK Parliament constituency)

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Cork City
Former Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
18011922
Number of members Two

Cork City was a parliamentary constituency in Ireland, represented in the Parliament of the United Kingdom. From 1880 to 1922 it returned two members of parliament (MPs) to the House of Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. From 1922 it was not represented in the UK Parliament, as it was no longer in the UK.

Cork City was the only constituency in Ireland to return the same number of members, in each general election, from the Act of Union in 1801 until the establishment of the Irish Free State in 1922.

Boundaries[edit]

This constituency comprised the whole of the County of the City of Cork, which was part of County Cork. Cork had the status of a county of itself, although it remained connected with County Cork for certain purposes.

The definition of the constituency boundary, from the Parliamentary Boundaries (Ireland) Act 1832 (c. 89 2& 3 Will. 4), was as follows.

The County of the City of Cork.

A Topographical Directory of Ireland, published in 1837, describes the area covered.

The county of the city comprises a populous rural district of great beauty and fertility, watered by several small rivulets and intersected by the river Lee and its noble estuary: it is bounded on the north by the barony of Fermoy, on the east by that of Barrymore, on the south by Kerricurrihy, and on the west by Muskerry: it comprehends the parishes of St. Finbarr, Christ-Church or the Holy Trinity, St. Peter, St. Mary Shandon, St. Anne Shandon, St. Paul and St. Nicholas, all, except part of St. Finbarr's, within the city and suburbs, and those of Curricuppane, Carrigrohanemore, Kilcully, and Rathcoony, together with parts of the parishes of Killanully or Killingly, Carrigaline, Dunbullogue or Carrignavar, Ballinaboy, Inniskenny, Kilnaglory, White-church, and Templemichael, without those limits; and contains, according to the Ordnance survey, an area of 44,463 statute acres, of which, 2396 are occupied by the city and suburbs.

The Directory also has a passage on the representative history. Other, more modern, sources ascribe an earlier date to the start of the parliamentary representation of Cork; but the passage is useful for information about the 19th century position.

The city first sent members to the Irish parliament in 1374, but representatives who appear to have served in London were chosen previously. The right of election was vested in the freemen of the city, and in the 40s. freeholders and £50 leaseholders of the county of the city, of whom the freemen, in 1831, amounted in number to 2331, and the freeholders to 1545, making a total of 3876; but by the act of the 2nd of Wm. IV., cap. 88 (under which the city, from its distinguished importance, retains its privilege of returning two representatives to the Imperial parliament, and the limits of the franchise, comprising the entire county of the city, remain unaltered), the non-resident freemen, except within seven miles, have been disfranchised, and the privilege of voting at elections has been extended to the £10 householders, and the £20 and £10 leaseholders for the respective terms of 14 and 20 years. The number of voters registered up to Jan. 2nd, 1836, amounted to 4791, of whom 1065 were freemen; 2727 £10 householders; 105 £50, 152 £20, and 608 forty-shilling freeholders; 3 £50, 7 £20, and 2 £10 rent-chargers; and 1 £50, 26 £20, and 95 £10 leaseholders: the sheriffs are the returning officers.

Members of Parliament[edit]

Date First member First party Second member Second party
1801, 1 January Hon. John Hely-Hutchinson[1] Whig Mountifort Longfield Tory
1802, 8 January Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson Whig
1812, 5 November Sir Nicholas Conway Colthurst, Bt[2] Tory
1818, 13 July Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson[3] Whig
1826, 29 December John Hely-Hutchinson Whig
1829, 9 July Gerrard Callaghan[4] Tory
1830, 29 March Daniel Callaghan[5] Whig
1830, 11 August Hon. John Boyle Whig
1832, 21 December Repeal Association Dr. Herbert Baldwin Repeal Association
1835, 17 January Joseph Leycester[6] Conservative James Charles Chatterton[6] Conservative
1835, 18 April Daniel Callaghan[7] Repeal Association Dr. Herbert Baldwin[8] Repeal Association
1837, 11 August Francis Bernard Beamish[9] Repeal Association
1841, 5 July Francis Stack Murphy[10] Whig
1846, 31 January Alexander McCarthy Repeal Association
1847, 9 August William Trant Fagan[11] Repeal Association
1849, 4 November James Charles Chatterton Conservative
1851, 23 April Francis Stack Murphy[12] Whig
1852, 14 July William Trant Fagan[13] Whig
1853, 20 August Francis Bernard Beamish[14] Whig
1859, 6 June Liberal Liberal
1859, 29 June Francis Lyons[15] Liberal
1865, 14 February Nicholas Daniel Murphy[16] Liberal
1865, 12 July John Francis Maguire[17] Liberal
1872, 10 December Joseph Philip Ronayne[18] Home Rule League
1874, 6 February Home Rule League
1876, 25 May William Goulding Conservative
1880, 5 April John Daly[19] Home Rule League Charles Stewart Parnell[20] Home Rule League
1882 Irish Parliamentary Irish Parliamentary
1884, 23 February John Deasy Irish Parliamentary
1885, 27 November Maurice Healy Irish Parliamentary
1891, 6 November Anti-Parnellite Martin Flavin Anti-Parnellite
1892, 6 July William O'Brien Anti-Parnellite
1895, 27 June J. F. X. O'Brien Anti-Parnellite
1900, 4 October William O'Brien Irish Parliamentary Irish Parliamentary
1904, 1 January vacant[21]
1904, 19 August William O'Brien[21] Irish Parliamentary
1905, 14 June Augustine Roche Irish Parliamentary
1909, 1 May Maurice Healy Independent Nationalist
1910, 18 January[22] William O'Brien All-for-Ireland League
1910, 6 December Maurice Healy All-for-Ireland League
1914, 18 February[23] Independent Nationalist
1918, December James J. Walsh Sinn Féin Liam de Róiste Sinn Féin
1922 constituency abolished

Elections[edit]

Candidates referred to as Non Partisan, did not have a party allegiance specified in either Stooks Smith or Walker (see reference section below for the sources) or capable of being inferred by disaggregating different groups incorporated under one label by Walker (such as Whigs before 1859 being listed as Liberals).

In multi-member elections, a change in vote percentage is only calculated for individual candidates not for parties. No attempt is made to compare changes between single member by-elections and previous or subsequent multi-member elections.

Turnouts, in multi-member elections from 1832, are calculated on the basis of the number of electors Stooks Smith records as voting. In some cases estimated turnouts are obtained by dividing the ballots cast by two, to obtain the lowest possible turnout figure. To the extent that electors did not use both their votes, the estimate will be less than the actual turnout.

1910s1900s1890s1880s1870s1860s1850s1840s1830s1820s1810s1800s

Elections of the 1910s[edit]

  • The constituency ceased to be represented in the United Kingdom Parliament, upon the dissolution of the House of Commons, in 1922. This was a few days before the Irish Free State came into existence.
General Election 14 December 1918: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Sinn Féin James Joseph Walsh 20,801 34.26 N/A
Sinn Féin Liam de Róiste 20,506 33.77 N/A
Irish Parliamentary Maurice Talbot-Crosbie 7,480 12.32 N/A
Irish Parliamentary Richard L. O'Sullivan 7,162 11.79 N/A
Irish Unionist Daniel Williams 2,519 4.15 N/A
Irish Unionist Thomas Farrington 2,254 3.71 N/A
Turnout 60,772 67.44 (est.) -5.59
Registered electors 60,722
  • The count took place on 28 December 1918, to allow time for postal votes from the armed forces to arrive. The Sinn Féin MPs did not take their seats at Westminster.
By-Election 18 February 1914: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
All-for-Ireland William O'Brien Unopposed N/A N/A
All-for-Ireland hold Swing N/A
Registered electors 12,923
General Election December 1910: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
All-for-Ireland William O'Brien 5,384 26.73 +2.91
All-for-Ireland Maurice Healy 5,269 26.16 +3.95
Irish Parliamentary William Hoey Kearney Redmond 4,746 23.56 N/A
Irish Parliamentary Augustine Roche 4,743 23.55 +0.24
Turnout 20,142 72.99 (est.) +4.00
Registered electors 13,797
  • Redmond and Roche were associated with the United Irish League wing of Irish Nationalism.
  • William O'Brien resigned again for a fourth time in January 1914 and re-stood to test local support for his policies, after the All-for-Ireland League suffered heavy defeats in the Cork City municipal elections.
General Election 18 January 1910: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
All-for-Ireland William O'Brien 4,535 23.82 N/A
Irish Parliamentary Augustine Roche 4,438 23.31 N/A
All-for-Ireland Maurice Healy 2,235 14.38 -9.90
Irish Parliamentary Dr William Murphy 3,776 19.83 N/A
Independent Nationalist Sir Edward Fitzgerald, Bt 2,061 10.83 N/A
Turnout 19,039 69.00 (est.) N/A
Registered electors 13,797
  • Roche and Murphy were associated with the United Irish League wing of Irish Nationalism.

Elections of the 1900s[edit]

  • Cosbie was associated with the United Irish League wing of Irish Nationalism
By-Election 1 May 1909: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Independent Nationalist Maurice Healy 4,706 57.02 N/A
Irish Parliamentary George Cosbie 3,547 42.98 N/A
Majority 1,159 14.04 N/A
Turnout 8,253 60.66 N/A
Independent Nationalist gain from Irish Parliamentary Swing N/A
Registered electors 13,605
  • William O'Brien resigned for a third time in 1909.
General Election 13 January 1906: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Parliamentary William O'Brien Unopposed N/A N/A
Irish Parliamentary Augustine Roche Unopposed N/A N/A
Registered electors 13,285
By-Election 14 June 1905: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Parliamentary Augustine Roche Unopposed N/A N/A
Irish Parliamentary hold Swing N/A
  • William O'Brien was elected "without his knowledge and against his consent".[24]
  • Death of J. F. X. O'Brien, in 1905.
By-Election 19 August 1904: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Parliamentary William O'Brien Unopposed N/A N/A
Irish Parliamentary hold Swing N/A
Registered electors 13,103
  • William O'Brien resigned again in January 1904.
General Election 4 October 1900: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Parliamentary William O'Brien 6,716 41.67 N/A
Irish Parliamentary James Francis Xavier O'Brien 6,513 35.46 +9.42
Independent Nationalist Jeremiah Charles Blake 2,235 14.38 -9.90
Independent Nationalist Maurice Healy 1,985 12.77 -12.50
Turnout 15,545 59.09 (est.) -17.45
Registered electors 13,153
  • Note: Blake and Healy were Healyite candidates.
  • The Irish National Federation, the Irish National League and William O'Brien's United Irish League joined forces, to re-create the Irish Parliamentary Party (IPP), in 1900. Healy contested the 1900 general election as an Independent Nationalist, after forming a Healyite faction, outside the IPP.

Elections of the 1890s[edit]

General Election 16 July 1895: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish National Federation James Francis Xavier O'Brien 5,327 26.04 N/A
Irish National Federation Maurice Healy 5,169 25.27 -3.94
Parnellite Nationalist Augustine Roche 4,994 24.41 N/A
Parnellite Nationalist Jeremiah Charles Blake 4,966 24.28 N/A
Turnout 20,456 76.55 (est.) -2.74
Registered electors 13,362
By-Election 27 June 1895: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish National Federation James Francis Xavier O'Brien 4,309 51.05 N/A
Parnellite Nationalist Augustine Roche 4,132 48.95 N/A
Majority 177 2.10 N/A
Turnout 8,441 63.17 N/A
Irish National Federation hold Swing N/A
Registered electors 13,362
  • Resignation of William O'Brien
General Election 6 July 1892: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish National Federation William O'Brien 5,273 32.36 +15.56
Irish National Federation Maurice Healy 4,759 29.21 N/A
Parnellite Nationalist William Hoey Kearney Redmond 3,186 19.55 N/A
Parnellite Nationalist Daniel Horgan 3,077 18.88 N/A
Turnout 16,295 79.29 (est.) N/A
Registered electors 10,276
By-Election 6 November 1891: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish National Federation Martin Flavin 3,669 52.51 N/A
Parnellite Nationalist John Edward Redmond 2,157 30.37 N/A
Irish Unionist Dominick Ronayne Patrick Sarsfield 1,161 16.62 N/A
Majority 1,512 21.64 N/A
Turnout 6,987 67.99 N/A
Irish National Federation gain from Parnellite Nationalist Swing N/A
Registered electors 10,276
  • The Irish Parliamentary Party split in December 1890. Parnell led the Irish National League, Parnellite Nationalist group. Most of the IPP MPs (including Healy) set up the Irish National Federation as the Anti-Parnellite Nationalist organisation.
  • Parnell died in office.

Elections of the 1880s[edit]

General Election 2 July 1886: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Parliamentary Charles Stewart Parnell Unopposed N/A N/A
Irish Parliamentary Maurice Healy Unopposed N/A N/A
Registered electors 14,569
General Election 27 November 1885: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Parliamentary Charles Stewart Parnell 6,716 41.67 +15.56
Irish Parliamentary Maurice Healy 6,536 40.55 N/A
Conservative Joseph Pike 1,464 9.08 N/A
Conservative John Hugh Bainbridge 1,401 8.69 N/A
Turnout 16,117 55.31 (est.) -6.27
Registered electors 14,569
By-Election 23 February 1884: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Parliamentary John Deasy 2,125 64.83 N/A
Conservative William Goulding 1,153 35.17 N/A
Majority 972 29.65 N/A
Turnout 3,278 64.98 N/A
Irish Parliamentary hold Swing N/A
Registered electors 5,045
  • Resignation of Daly
  • 1882: Home Rule League/Nationalist Party becomes the Irish Parliamentary Party
  • 1880, 5 April (1) John Daly, 1834 – August 1888, aged 54, (2) Charles Stewart Parnell (to 1891) formerly MP for Meath 21 April 1875–1880
General Election 5 April 1880: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Home Rule John Daly 1,923 33.36 N/A
Home Rule Charles Stewart Parnell 1,505 26.11 N/A
Conservative William Goulding 1,337 23.20 +4.47
Liberal Nicholas Daniel Murphy 999 17.33 N/A
Turnout 5,764 61.58 (est.) -10.99
Registered electors 4,680

Elections of the 1870s[edit]

By-Election 25 May 1876: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative William Goulding 1,279 38.90 N/A
Home Rule John Daly 1,168 35.52 N/A
Home Rule Denny Lane 841 25.58 N/A
Majority 111 3.38 N/A
Turnout 3,288 74.71 N/A
Conservative gain from Home Rule Swing N/A
Registered electors 4,401
  • Death of Ronayne, on 7 May 1876
General Election 6 February 1874: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Home Rule Joseph Philip Ronayne 1,917 30.15 N/A
Home Rule Nicholas Daniel Murphy 1,643 25.84 -15.42
Conservative William Goulding 1,191 18.73 N/A
Conservative James Edwin Pim 1,097 17.25 N/A
Independent Nationalist John Mitchel 511 8.04 N/A
Turnout 6,359 72.57 (est.) -8.75
Registered electors 4,381
By-Election 10 December 1872: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Home Rule Joseph Philip Ronayne 1,883 62,91 N/A
Conservative James Edwin Pim 1,110 37.09 N/A
Majority 773 25.83 N/A
Turnout 2,993 67.39 N/A
Home Rule gain from Liberal Swing N/A
Registered electors 4,441
  • Death of Maguire (founder Cork Examiner), on 1 November 1872

Elections of the 1860s[edit]

General Election 20 November 1868: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal John Francis Maguire 1,895 35.02 N/A
Liberal Nicholas Daniel Murphy 1,862 34.29 N/A
Conservative William Abbott 753 16.69 N/A
Conservative Christopher Crofts 3 0.07 N/A
Turnout 4,513 63.82 (est.) N/A
Registered electors 3,536
General Election 12 July 1865: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Nicholas Daniel Murphy Unopposed N/A N/A
Liberal John Francis Maguire Unopposed N/A N/A
Registered electors 3,143
By-Election 14 February 1865: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Nicholas Daniel Murphy Unopposed N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
  • Resignation of Lyons

Elections of the 1850s[edit]

By-Election 29 June 1859: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Francis Lyons Unopposed N/A N/A
Liberal hold Swing N/A
Registered electors 3,073
  • Beamish and Fagan joined the Liberal Party, which replaced the Whig Party, when it was formally founded shortly after the 1859 election.
  • Death of Fagan
General Election 6 May 1859: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Francis Bernard Beamish 1,288 26.77 N/A
Whig William Trant Fagan 1,231 25.58 N/A
Conservative Andrew J. Wood 1,208 25.10 N/A
Conservative Barcroft Carroll 1,085 22.5 N/A
Turnout 4,812 78.29 (est.) N/A
Registered electors 3,073
General Election 28 March 1857: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig William Trant Fagan Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Francis Bernard Beamish Unopposed N/A N/A
Registered electors 3,050
  • Appointment of Murphy as a Commissioner of Insolvency
By-Election 20 August 1853: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Francis Bernard Beamish 1,183 54.12 N/A
Conservative James Charles Chatterton 1,003 45.98 N/A
Majority 180 8.23 N/A
Turnout 2,186 69.35 N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
Registered electors 3,152
  • Note: Beamish was a brewer
General Election 14 July 1852: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Francis Stack Murphy 1,243 35.02 N/A
Whig William Trant Fagan 1,220 34.29 -0.83
Conservative James Charles Chatterton 898 25.24 N/A
Conservative William Lumley Perrier 194 5.45 N/A
Turnout 3,558 49.78 (est.) +12.77
Registered electors 3,039
  • Note: Murphy and Fagan were pledged to support the formation of an Independent Irish Opposition after the 1852 election. Fagan subsequently sought re-election as a Whig candidate.
By-Election 23 April 1851: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Francis Stack Murphy Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig gain from Irish Repeal Swing N/A
  • Resignation of Fagan

Elections of the 1840s[edit]

By-Election 14 November 1849: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative James Charles Chatterton 793 57.59 N/A
Whig Alexander McCarthy 584 42.41 N/A
Majority 209 15.18 N/A
Turnout 1,377 N/A N/A
Conservative gain from Irish Repeal Swing N/A
  • Note: Number of registered electors not yet located, so no turnout can be calculated.
  • Death of Callaghan
General Election 9 August 1847: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Repeal William Trant Fagan 929 35.12 N/A
Irish Repeal Daniel Callaghan 917 34.67 -1.06
Irish Repeal Alexander McCarthy 799 30.21 N/A
Turnout 2,645 37.00 (est.) -9.95
Registered electors 3,574
By-Election 31 January 1846: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Repeal Alexander McCarthy Unopposed N/A N/A
Irish Repeal gain from Whig Swing N/A
  • Resignation of Murphy
General Election 5 July 1841: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Francis Stack Murphy 1,486 36.26 N/A
Irish Repeal Daniel Callaghan 1,464 35.72 +6.78
Conservative James Charles Chatterton 1,017 24.82 +4.01
Conservative James Morris 131 3.20 N/A
Turnout 4,098 46.95 (est.) -11.74
Registered electors 4,364

Elections of the 1830s[edit]

General Election 11 August 1837: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Repeal Francis Bernard Beamish 1,951 29.19 N/A
Irish Repeal Daniel Callaghan 1,935 28.95 +4.23
Conservative Joseph Leycester 1,407 21.05 -4.52
Conservative James Charles Chatterton 1,391 20.81 -4.53
Turnout 6,684 (3,359 electors) 58.69 -16.60
Registered electors 5,723
  • Note: Beamish and Callaghan were the candidates of a Whig/Repealer electoral pact.
General Election 17 January 1835: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Joseph Leycester 1,658 25.57 N/A
Conservative James Charles Chatterton 1,643 25.34 N/A
Irish Repeal Daniel Callaghan 1,603 24.72 -8.60
Irish Repeal Dr Herbert Baldwin 1,580 24.37 -8.39
Turnout 6,484 (3,359 electors) 75.30 -10.22
Registered electors 4,461
  • Note: Callaghan and Baldwin were the candidates of a Whig/Repealer electoral pact. On petition Leycester and Chatterton were unseated and Callaghan and Baldwin were declared duly elected, on 18 April 1835.
General Election 21 December 1832: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Irish Repeal Daniel Callaghan 2,263 33.32 N/A
Irish Repeal Dr Herbert Baldwin 2,225 32.76 N/A
Tory William Henry Newenham 1,459 21.48 N/A
Whig Hon. John Boyle 845 12.44 N/A
Turnout 6,792 (3,696 electors) 85.52 N/A
Registered electors 4,322
General Election 7 May 1831: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Daniel Callaghan Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Hon. John Boyle Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 11 August 1830: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. John Boyle 1,152 48.18 N/A
Whig Daniel Callaghan 851 35.59 N/A
Non Partisan Dr Herbert Baldwin 388 16.23 N/A
Turnout 2,391 N/A N/A
  • Note: Stooks Smith classifies Baldwin as a Repealer at this election, but this may not be an accurate description for the period before 1832.
By-Election 29 March 1830: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Daniel Callaghan 1,171 50.34 N/A
Tory William Henry Newenham 1,155 49.66 -29.83
Majority 16 0.69 N/A
Turnout 2,326 N/A N/A
Whig gain from Tory Swing N/A
  • Note: Daniel Callaghan was the brother of Gerrard Callaghan. Stooks Smith classifies Callaghan as a Repealer from this election, but this may not be an accurate description for the period before 1832. See the footnote[where?] to the above table of MPs for a brief description of Callaghan's political views.

Elections of the 1820s[edit]

  • Election of Callaghan declared void, on petition
By-Election 9 July 1829: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Gerrard Callaghan 523 79.48 +30.72
Non Partisan Sir Augustus Warren, Bt 135 20.52 N/A
Majority 388 58.97 N/A
Turnout 658 N/A N/A
Tory hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Colthurst
By-Election 29 December 1826: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. John Hely-Hutchinson 1,019 51.23 N/A
Tory Gerrard Callaghan 970 48.77 N/A
Majority 49 2.46 N/A
Turnout 1,989 N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
  • Death of Hely-Hutchinson
General Election 13 June 1826: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Sir Nicholas Conway Colthurst, Bt Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 24 March 1820: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson 1,303 41.47 -2.07
Tory Sir Nicholas Conway Colthurst, Bt 1,080 34.37 +3.74
Tory Gerrard Callaghan 759 24.16 N/A
Turnout 3,142 (2,037 electors) N/A N/A

Elections of the 1810s[edit]

General Election 13 July 1818: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson 1,221 43.54 +14.84
Tory Sir Nicholas Conway Colthurst, Bt 859 30.63 +0.58
Tory Mountifort Longfield 724 25.82 -15.42
Turnout 2,804 (1,895 electors) N/A N/A
General Election 5 November 1812: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Mountifort Longfield 918 41.24 -24.36
Tory Sir Nicholas Conway Colthurst, Bt 669 30.05 N/A
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson 639 28.71 +3.11
Turnout 2,226 (1,400 electors) N/A N/A

Elections of the 1800s[edit]

General Election 20 May 1807: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Mountifort Longfield 82 65.6 N/A
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson 32 25.6 N/A
Non Partisan George Freke Evans 11 8.8 N/A
Turnout 125 (87 electors) N/A N/A
General Election 14 November 1806: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Mountifort Longfield Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson Unopposed N/A N/A
General Election 16 July 1802: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Mountifort Longfield Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson Unopposed N/A N/A
By-Election 8 January 1802: Cork City
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Whig Hon. Christopher Hely-Hutchinson Unopposed N/A N/A
Whig hold Swing N/A
Co-option with effect from 1 January 1801: Cork City (2 seats)
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Tory Mountifort Longfield Co-opted N/A N/A
Whig Hon. John Hely-Hutchinson Co-opted N/A N/A
  • 1801, 1 January Irish House of Commons members nominated to sit in the corresponding House of Parliament at Westminster

Reference notes[edit]

  1. ^ Elevated to the peerage as the 1st Baron Hutchinson, 1801
  2. ^ Died in office, 1829
  3. ^ Died in office, 1826
  4. ^ Election declared void
  5. ^ Who's Who of British members of parliament: Volume I 1832–1885, edited by M. Stenton (The Harvester Press 1976); described Callaghan as being of Whig principles, except on Irish Coercion Bills. He was the grandfather of Admiral George Callaghan.
  6. ^ a b name="Unseated on petition"
  7. ^ Seated on petition. Joint candidate of the Whig Party and Repeal Association in 1835 and 1837. Died in office, 1849.
  8. ^ Seated on petition. Joint candidate of the Whig Party and Repeal Association in 1835.
  9. ^ Joint candidate of the Whig Party and Repeal Association in 1837.
  10. ^ Resigned
  11. ^ Resigned, 1851
  12. ^ Pledged support to the formation of an Independent Irish Opposition, at the 1852 election. Resigned on becoming a Commissioner of Insolvency.
  13. ^ Pledged support to the formation of an Independent Irish Opposition, at the 1852 election. Re-elected, in 1857 and 1859, as a Whig. He became a Liberal on the formal foundation of that party after the 1859 election. Died 1859.
  14. ^ He became a Liberal on the formal foundation of that party after the 1859 election.
  15. ^ Resigned, 1865
  16. ^ Re-elected as a Liberal at the 1865 and 1868 general elections. Returned as a Home Ruler at the 1874 election.
  17. ^ Died in office, 1872
  18. ^ Died in office, 1876
  19. ^ A member of the Parnellite faction of the Home Rule League in 1880. Resigned as MP, 1884.
  20. ^ Leader of the Parnellite faction of the Home Rule League. Re-elected as an Irish Parliamentary Party candidate in 1885 and 1886, he led the Parnellite Nationalists after the split in 1890 until he died in office in 1891.
  21. ^ a b The by-election in August 1904 was triggered by William O'Brien resigned his seat on 1 January 1904, and stood for re-election. He was returned unopposed.
  22. ^ At the January 1910 general election, O'Brien was elected for both Cork City and [[North East Cork (UK Parliament constituency)|]]. He chose to sit for Cork City.
  23. ^ William O'Brien had been elected as an All-for-Ireland League candidate, but resigned his seat on 19 January 1914, and stood for re-election as an independent nationalist. He was returned unopposed.
  24. ^ The Times (London), Saturday, 27 August 1904 p. 8 col. C

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