Estevan Point

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Estevan Point
Location Hesquiat Peninsula, Vancouver Island, Canada
Coordinates 49°22′57″N 126°32′39″W / 49.382542°N 126.544110°W / 49.382542; -126.544110Coordinates: 49°22′57″N 126°32′39″W / 49.382542°N 126.544110°W / 49.382542; -126.544110
Year first lit 1909
Construction Concrete
Tower shape Octagonal tower with buttresses
Markings / pattern White tower with red lantern
Height 30.5 metres (100 ft)
Focal height 37.5 metres (123 ft)
Original lens First order Fresnel by Chance Brothers
Current lens Modern optic
Characteristic Fl.(2) 15 s
Admiralty number G5224
NGA number 14084
ARLHS number CAN-173

Estevan Point is a lighthouse located on the headland of the same name on the Hesquiat Peninsula on the west coast of Vancouver Island, Canada.

During the Second World War, in 1942, the Estevan Point lighthouse was attacked by Japanese submarine I-26, marking the first enemy attack on Canadian soil since the Fenian Raids of 1866 and 1871. This attack on Estevan Point Lighthouse was followed by Japanese balloon bomb (Fire balloon) attacks in 1944-45.

Currently the Canadian Coast Guard uses Estevan Point as a station. The light is still active though as of 2008 and emits a signal of a double flash every 15 seconds. The focal plane is located at 37.5 metres (123 ft) above sea level.[1]

History[edit]

The Spanish explorer Juan José Pérez Hernández, originating from Mallorca, traded with the natives of the region (the Nuu-chah-nulth people) when he explored the area in 1774 and named the headland "Punta San Esteban". Four years later, James Cook's expedition arrived in the Nootka Sound and made contact with the local population.[2]

The lighthouse was established in 1909 as one in a series of buttressed lighthouses designed by engineer William P. Anderson. The lighthouse was constructed in concrete as a 30.5 metres (100 ft) tall octagonal tower supported by buttresses. Originally, a first order Fresnel lens made by Chance Brothers of England had been used but together with the lantern it was dismantled during the 1980s and was then donated to a regional museum in 2004.

Estevan Point lighthouse attack[edit]

During the Second World War, the Estevan Point lighthouse was attacked by the Japanese submarine I-26[1] On June 20, 1942, the I-26, under the command of Yokota Minoru,[3] fired 25-30 rounds of 5.5" shells at the Estevan Point lighthouse but failed to hit its target and the lighthouse remained undamaged.[4] Though no casualties were reported, the subsequent decision to turn off the lights of outer stations was disastrous for shipping activity.[5]

Climate[edit]

Climate data for Estevan Point
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high Humidex 13.3 16.1 15.0 18.3 22.6 29.6 31.0 27.3 32.4 20.4 17.7 12.9 32.4
Record high °C (°F) 17.2
(63)
17.2
(63)
18.0
(64.4)
22.0
(71.6)
26.0
(78.8)
26.7
(80.1)
28.9
(84)
27.5
(81.5)
26.5
(79.7)
21.1
(70)
17.8
(64)
14.4
(57.9)
28.9
(84)
Average high °C (°F) 7.6
(45.7)
8.4
(47.1)
9.3
(48.7)
11.0
(51.8)
13.2
(55.8)
14.9
(58.8)
16.7
(62.1)
17.2
(63)
16.3
(61.3)
13.0
(55.4)
9.8
(49.6)
7.9
(46.2)
12.1
(53.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) 5.2
(41.4)
5.7
(42.3)
6.4
(43.5)
7.9
(46.2)
10.3
(50.5)
12.3
(54.1)
14.0
(57.2)
14.4
(57.9)
13.3
(55.9)
10.2
(50.4)
7.2
(45)
5.4
(41.7)
9.4
(48.9)
Average low °C (°F) 2.7
(36.9)
3.0
(37.4)
3.4
(38.1)
4.8
(40.6)
7.3
(45.1)
9.7
(49.5)
11.3
(52.3)
11.6
(52.9)
10.1
(50.2)
7.4
(45.3)
4.5
(40.1)
2.9
(37.2)
6.6
(43.9)
Record low °C (°F) −13.9
(7)
−10.6
(12.9)
−7.8
(18)
−3.3
(26.1)
0.0
(32)
2.8
(37)
4.4
(39.9)
5.0
(41)
−1.1
(30)
−4.4
(24.1)
−15.0
(5)
−11.7
(10.9)
−15.0
(5)
Wind chill −16.3 −11.5 −12.2 −6.5 −2.3 0.4 4.0 4.0 −0.2 −5.3 −11.9 −18.4 −18.4
Precipitation mm (inches) 411.1
(16.185)
345.7
(13.61)
320.0
(12.598)
257.6
(10.142)
165.5
(6.516)
152.3
(5.996)
72.7
(2.862)
100.0
(3.937)
147.1
(5.791)
330.2
(13)
436.8
(17.197)
437.9
(17.24)
3,176.9
(125.075)
Rainfall mm (inches) 403.5
(15.886)
339.6
(13.37)
315.2
(12.409)
255.0
(10.039)
165.5
(6.516)
152.3
(5.996)
72.7
(2.862)
100.0
(3.937)
147.1
(5.791)
330.2
(13)
434.4
(17.102)
431.7
(16.996)
3,147.1
(123.902)
Snowfall cm (inches) 6.8
(2.68)
5.6
(2.2)
3.8
(1.5)
2.1
(0.83)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
2.4
(0.94)
5.5
(2.17)
26.2
(10.31)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm) 22.5 19.8 21.4 19.6 16.3 15.3 10.4 11.6 12.9 19.3 23.5 23.5 216.2
Avg. rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm) 22.0 19.5 21.3 19.6 16.3 15.3 10.4 11.6 12.9 19.3 23.4 22.9 214.5
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm) 1.8 2.1 1.3 0.41 0.03 0 0 0 0 0.03 0.53 1.9 8.1
Mean monthly sunshine hours 65.4 83.8 124.0 164.9 213.5 204.0 234.4 203.2 181.5 124.8 70.3 59.8 1,729.6
Source: 1971-2000 Environment Canada[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rowlett, Russ. "Lighthouses of British Columbia". The Lighthouse Directory. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved July 24, 2008. 
  2. ^ "Early Exploration". Nootka Sound Service. Retrieved July 24, 2008. 
  3. ^ SENSUIKAN! — HIJMS Submarine I-26: Tabular Record of Movement, combinedfleet.com, retrieved 2007-12-09 
  4. ^ Conn, Stetson; Engelman, Rose C.; Fairchild, Byron (2000) [1964], "The Continental Defense Commands After Pearl Harbor", Guarding the United States and its Outposts, Center of Military History, United States Army, CMH Pub 4-2, retrieved 2007-12-09 
  5. ^ Japanese Submarines on the West Coast of Canada, pinetreeline.org, retrieved 2007-12-09 
  6. ^ "Canadian Climate Normals 1971-2000". Environment Canada. Retrieved November 11, 2012. 

External links[edit]