Fort Leaton State Historic Site

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Fort Leaton State Historic Site
FORT LEATON.jpg
Map showing the location of Fort Leaton State Historic Site
Map showing the location of Fort Leaton State Historic Site
Fort Leaton State Historic Site
Location Presidio County, USA
Nearest city Presidio, Texas
Coordinates 29°32′39″N 104°19′41″W / 29.54417°N 104.32806°W / 29.54417; -104.32806Coordinates: 29°32′39″N 104°19′41″W / 29.54417°N 104.32806°W / 29.54417; -104.32806
Area 23.4 acres (9.5 ha)
Established 1978
Governing body Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

The Fort Leaton State Historic Site is located on Farm to Market Road 170, in Presidio County in the U.S. state of Texas. The original adobe structure was a private residence dating back to the early 19th century. It was purchased in 1848 by Benjamin Leaton, who adapted it as a fortress. Fort Leaton was the Presidio County original seat of government. Through murders, financial difficulties and abandonment, the structure changed hands numerous times. In 1967, it was deeded to the state of Texas and opened to the public in 1978 as a Texas State Historic Site. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places listings in Presidio County, Texas on June 18, 1973.

History[edit]

Fort Leaton is believed to have been built as an adobe residence in the 1830s by Juan Bustillos. In 1848, it was acquired by Benjamin Leaton, who lived in the structure and also used it as his trading post and fortress.[1]

Benjamin Leaton was a trader, freight hauler along the Chihuahua Trail, and a bounty hunter paid by various local governments in Mexico for each scalp taken from an indigenous person. He also traded munitions to the Apache and Comanche for any stolen cattle they brought him.[2] When Presidio County was established in 1850, Fort Leaton was its first seat of government.[3] Leaton died in 1851,[4] and his widow married Edward Hall who continued operating the freight business from the fort. Hall became financially indebted to Leaton's scalp hunting partner John Burgess. Hall defaulted on his debt to Burgess in 1864, and was murdered. Burgess took over the fort, and was in turn murdered by Leaton's son in 1875. The Burgess family remained in the fort until they abandoned it in 1926.[5] The fort was purchased by Marfa State Bank and a private citizen in the 1930s and donated to Presidio County. An attempt at restoration was begun, but adequate financing never materialized. The site was then purchased by a private citizen and donated to the state of Texas. In 1968, the site was designated Fort Leaton State Historic Site.[1] It opened to the public in 1978.[6]

Fort Leaton was added to the National Register of Historic Places listings in Presidio County, Texas on June 18, 1973.[7]

Facilities[edit]

Fort Leaton State Historic Site is on Farm to Market Road 170, 5 miles (8.0 km) southeast of Presidio, Texas.[6]

The site contains historic ruins, nature trails, and exhibits. There is a picnic area and public restrooms. The Texas State Park Store gift shop is located on the grounds.[6]

The Barton Warnock Environmental Education Center serves as the visitor center for both Ft. Leaton State Historic Site and Big Bend Ranch State Park.[8]

Wireless Internet Access (Wi-Fi) is available in some areas of this site.[9]

Hours, admission[edit]

Fort Leaton is open 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., 7 days a week, but closed on Christmas Day.[6]

Entrance fee applies. Special event rental fees by prior arrangement. Guided tours are available for an additional fee. Group tours need to be coordinated in advance with the Park.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Smith, Julia Cauble. "Ft. Leaton State Historic Site". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 7 February 2012. 
  2. ^ Laine, Don; Laine, Barbara; Olson, Jack; Peterson, Eric; Christensen, Shane (2010). Frommer's National Parks of the American West. Frommer's. pp. 50, 51. ISBN 978-0-470-53767-1. 
  3. ^ Smith, Julia Cauble. "Presidio County". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved 7 February 2012. 
  4. ^ Field, Ron; Hook, Adam (2006). Forts of the American Frontier 1820–91: The Southern Plains and Southwest. Osprey Publishing. p. 18. ISBN 978-1-84603-040-6. 
  5. ^ Parent, Laurence (2008). Official Guide to Texas State Parks and Historic Sites: Revised Edition. University of Texas Press. pp. xxviii, xxix. ISBN 978-0-292-71726-8. 
  6. ^ a b c d e "Fort Leaton State Historic Site". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved 7 February 2012. 
  7. ^ "NRHP Ft Leaton". Texas Historical Association. Retrieved 7 February 2012. 
  8. ^ "Barton Warnock Visitor Center". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved 9 February 2012. 
  9. ^ "TPWD Wi-Fi Access". Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 

External links[edit]